Articles from 2015(22)

The Analytical Engine: 28 Plans and Counting

The Analytical Engine: 28 Plans and Counting

Tim Robinson  Dec 08, 2015 Guest Blog
December 10, 2015 marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Ada Byron, later Countess of Lovelace, most famous for her 1843 description of Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine. Read More
The Storage Engine: A Timeline of Milestones in Storage Technology

The Storage Engine: A Timeline of Milestones in Storage Technology

The Storage Engine: A Timeline of Milestones in Storage Technology, a new online exhibit at the Computer History Museum, tells the stories of some of the key people, processes, products, and organizations that have contributed to advances in computer data storage. Read More
First Steps: Lectures from the Dawn of Computing
Maxing Out the Minimal: CHM’s Archives Processing Project Is Underway

Maxing Out the Minimal: CHM’s Archives Processing Project Is Underway

In 2014 the Museum applied for and received a $274,560 grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) to process a portion of its backlog over a span of two years. We are now six months into CHM’s Archives Processing Project (CHM APP), and we have a lot to report. Read More
Ada Lovelace Day

Ada Lovelace Day

Betty Toole  Oct 13, 2015 Guest Blog
Today is Ada Lovelace Day the beginning of festivities to honor Augusta Ada Byron, Lady Lovelace whose 200th birthday will be celebrated on 10 December. She was a remarkable woman. Read More
Tools of the Trade: An historical look at technology and commerce
The Boston Computer Society Presents: 1981 Forum on the Future of Personal Computers

The Boston Computer Society Presents: 1981 Forum on the Future of Personal Computers

This is the first of five video releases of The Boston Computer Society (BCS) General Meetings, by the Computer History Museum. Read More
Amiga Computing at the Computer History Museum

Amiga Computing at the Computer History Museum

Adam P. Spring  Aug 26, 2015 Guest Blog
The Amiga computer celebrated its 30th birthday at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California July 25-26, 2015. For a dedicated group of users, its technical achievements were fondly remembered and recognized. Launched at the Lincoln Center in New York in 1985, the Amiga 1000 was the first affordable multitasking computer to enter the PC market. Commodore owned the rights to the Amiga until they went bankrupt in 1994. Its release changed the face of creative computing forever – even if it is now considered a footnote in computing history. Read More
2015 Computer History Museum Fellow Awards

2015 Computer History Museum Fellow Awards

The Fellow Awards are a long-standing tradition at the Computer History Museum, dating back to 1987 when the Museum inducted its very first Fellow, computer scientist and US Navy rear admiral Grace Hopper. The Fellow Awards are an opportunity for the Museum to celebrate the heroes of computing—men and women who have made major contributions to the computer and software-driven world in which we all live. Read More
Electronic Arts DeluxePaint Early Source Code

Electronic Arts DeluxePaint Early Source Code

By the mid-1980s, mass-produced personal computers had finally become powerful enough to be used for graphics. Apple had released their drawing program MacPaint [5] with the first Macintosh in 1984. But at $2500 the Mac was expensive, and it only displayed black and white images. Read More
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