Articles from 2016(41)

The Preservation Game: How Social Media Saved Bletchley Park

The Preservation Game: How Social Media Saved Bletchley Park

Lauren Miyamoto  Dec 27, 2016 CHM Live
In 2003, Dr. Sue Black encountered a sight that made her ashamed to be British. She was visiting Bletchley Park, the home of 10,000 men and women who worked to decode German messages during World War II. Although the work done at this historic location is estimated to have saved 22 million lives and is often referred to as the birthplace of coding, she was shocked to find it in a dilapidated condition. Read More
Fairchild, Fairchildren, and the Family Tree of Silicon Valley

Fairchild, Fairchildren, and the Family Tree of Silicon Valley

Through an unprecedented series of technical, business, and cultural innovations, Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation spawned hundreds of ventures that established Silicon Valley as a world center of entrepreneurial activity and technological leadership. Although the firm’s market valuation never exceeded $2.5 billion, its surviving combined progeny have been estimated to be worth over $2 trillion. Read More
Remembering Erich Bloch (January 9, 1925–November 25, 2016)

Remembering Erich Bloch (January 9, 1925–November 25, 2016)

Though Erich Bloch was less visible to most of the computing community, his contributions most likely impacted your life. As a pioneer who made his first contribution as the project engineer on the legendary IBM Stretch and who was responsible for manufacturing the IBM System/360, his work changed the fortunes of IBM to make it the world leader in computing. As a colleague, friend, and former boss, I saw his impact on computing, education, engineering, and scientific research and technology policies. He was also important to the Computer History Museum (CHM) as a Museum Fellow and as an early director of CHM’s predecessor institution, The Computer Museum (TCM). I’m happy to share this reminiscence of one of computing’s giants. Read More
The Next Billion: A Conversation with Kiva Executive Chair Julie Hanna

The Next Billion: A Conversation with Kiva Executive Chair Julie Hanna

During our wide-ranging discussion, Julie shared her insights on important questions, including: How are entrepreneurs changing the lives of the next billion? How is technology being used as a force for democratization of access and opportunity? Where are hot spots around the world for entrepreneurship and what can Silicon Valley learn from them? Read More
Computing Luminaries Honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom

Computing Luminaries Honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom

The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the highest honors that can be bestowed by the President of the United States. It recognizes “An especially meritorious contribution to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.” Read More
Blogged by CHM in California: 20 Years of Apple Design

Blogged by CHM in California: 20 Years of Apple Design

On November 15 Apple announced Designed by Apple in California, a coffee table book chronicling 20 years of Apple products. The pages are filled with the iconic minimalism that accompanies most photos, all shot by photographer Andrew Zuckerman, and embodies what a lot of us consider to be the Apple “look.” Read More
Day of the Dead: Exploring Failure with Silicon Valley Veterans Kim Polese, Bill Reichert, and Justin Kan

Day of the Dead: Exploring Failure with Silicon Valley Veterans Kim Polese, Bill Reichert, and Justin Kan

Work in Silicon Valley long enough, and you’ll end up with your own private collection of startup paraphernalia: T-shirts, tchotchkes, branded office supplies, and other relics of companies failed but not forgotten. At the “Day of the Dead” event on October 28, co-hosted by Exponential Center and the NextGen Board, attendees sported them like badges of honor. Read More
50th Anniversary of the HP 2116 Minicomputer

50th Anniversary of the HP 2116 Minicomputer

Chuck House  Nov 07, 2016 Guest Blog
Amidst a sea of computer vendors, the 1966 Fall Joint Computer Conference booth for an obscure instrument manufacturer, Hewlett-Packard, was insignificant. Their lone product, the HP 2116, said “Computer” on the front panel, but the company called it an “Instrumentation Controller.” Founder David Packard was clear: “We won’t compete with key customer IBM, a company 20 times larger than HP.” The HP 2116 was the second 16-bit computer offered for sale worldwide, after the DDP-116, from an equally obscure Massachusetts company, CCC, in 1965. Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) didn’t introduce a 16-bit machine until 1970—the PDP-11. Read More
Personal Computing 1984: PC Pragmatists, Macintosh Visionaries & the Future of Portability

Personal Computing 1984: PC Pragmatists, Macintosh Visionaries & the Future of Portability

This is the fourth of five video releases of Boston Computer Society (BCS) General Meetings, by the Computer History Museum Read More
A Haunted Tour of Silicon Valley

A Haunted Tour of Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley is known for its cutting-edge technology, creative innovation, and forward-looking frame of mind. But the Valley also has a lesser-known side—a spookier side. Read More
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5