ABOUT JOHN MARKOFF

John Markoff joined the Computer History Museum (CHM) as its historian in January 2017. He is a part of CHM’s extensive interpretive team, including curators, educators, exhibit designers, and media producers. Prior to joining CHM, Markoff was the business and technology reporter of The New York Times since March of 1988. Prior to his near 30-year tenure at The Times, Markoff was a reporter for San Francisco’s Pacific News Service from 1977 to 1981 and wrote a column on personal computing for The San Jose Mercury News from 1983 to 1985. He was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize multiple times before winning in 2013 for reporting on the impact of technology on labor and automation. Markoff has written two books that offer a unique perspective on computer history, including What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry in 2005 and Machines of Loving Grace: The Quest for Common Ground between Humans and Robots in 2015.

JOHN MARKOFF ARTICLES (4)

Creating Magic: A Conversation with Original iPhone Engineers & Software Team Lead Scott Forstall

Creating Magic: A Conversation with Original iPhone Engineers & Software Team Lead Scott Forstall

  June 22, 2017
When Steve Jobs returned to Apple in 1997 after it acquired NeXT, he brought with him a close-knit group of engineers. One of them was Scott Forstall, a young software designer who had come to NeXT...   Read More
Computing for the Whole World: A Conversation with iPod & iPhone Inventor Tony Fadell

Computing for the Whole World: A Conversation with iPod & iPhone Inventor Tony Fadell

  May 31, 2017
Tony Fadell doesn’t fit the Silicon Valley mold. His parents were neither engineers nor scientists. As a young boy he grew up moving frequently because his father was in “the rag business,” as he described it...   Read More
“Unprogramming” the ENIAC: Lehmer Child’s Play

“Unprogramming” the ENIAC: Lehmer Child’s Play

  May 09, 2017
At the dawn of the modern computing era teenager Laura Lehmer Gould and her brother Donald Lehmer were the youngest “un-programmers.” That is because ENIAC, one of the world’s first general-purpose computers, was programmed with an...   Read More
Computing in Your Pocket: The Prehistory of the iPhone in Silicon Valley

Computing in Your Pocket: The Prehistory of the iPhone in Silicon Valley

  March 14, 2017
On Thursday, March 2, four pioneering Silicon Valley technologists shared the stage at the Computer History Museum (CHM), turning the clock back three decades and exploring the prehistory of the iPhone. Two decades before Steve Jobs...   Read More