About Len Shustek

Len Shustek is chairman of the board of trustees of the Computer History Museum. In 1979, he co-founded Nestar Systems, an early developer of networks for personal computers. In 1986, he co-founded Network General, a manufacturer of network analysis tools including The Sniffer™. The company became Network Associates after merging with McAfee Associates and PGP. He has taught computer science at Carnegie-Mellon and Stanford Universities, and was a founder of the “angel financing” firm VenCraft. He has served on various boards, including the Polytechnic Institute of New York University.

Articles by Len Shustek(14)

The Eudora™ Email Client Source Code

The Eudora™ Email Client Source Code

 May 22, 2018 From the Collection
Electronic mail is one of “killer apps” of networked computing. The ability to quickly send and receive messages without having to be online at the same time created a new form of human communication. By now billions of people have used email. Read More
In His Own Words: Gary Kildall

In His Own Words: Gary Kildall

 Aug 02, 2016 Remarkable People
Gary Kildall was a pioneer of personal computer software. He wrote programming language tools, including assemblers (Intel 4004), interpreters (BASIC), and compilers (PL/M). He created a widely-used disk operating system (CP/M). He and his wife, Dorothy McEwen, started a successful company called Digital Research to develop and market CP/M, which for years was the dominant operating system for personal microcomputers. Thousands of programs were written to run under it, and a million or more people might have used it. Read More
Programming the ENIAC: an example of why computer history is hard

Programming the ENIAC: an example of why computer history is hard

 May 18, 2016 Curatorial Insight
We take history seriously at the Computer History Museum. It’s our middle name, after all. But it’s not easy history to do, for several reasons. Read More
The 1986 ACM Conference on the History of Personal Workstations

The 1986 ACM Conference on the History of Personal Workstations

 Jan 27, 2016 From the Collection
On January 9th and 10th of 1986, at Rickey’s Hyatt House in Palo Alto, California, there was an historic gathering of the pioneers who invented personal computing. The event was sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), and hosted by the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). Called the “ACM Conference on the History of Personal Workstations”, it was chaired by Alan Perlis of Yale University and organized by John White of PARC. The speakers were a “who’s who” of innovative computing, including Allen Newell, Gordon Bell, JCR Licklider, Larry Roberts, Doug Engelbart, Alan Kay, Chuck Thacker, Butler Lampson, Wes Clark, and others. If you were lucky enough to have been there, you were a witness to a remarkable event. Read More
Electronic Arts DeluxePaint Early Source Code

Electronic Arts DeluxePaint Early Source Code

 Jul 22, 2015 From the Collection
By the mid-1980s, mass-produced personal computers had finally become powerful enough to be used for graphics. Apple had released their drawing program MacPaint [5] with the first Macintosh in 1984. But at $2500 the Mac was expensive, and it only displayed black and white images. Read More
Computer History Museum: Celebrating 35 Years!

Computer History Museum: Celebrating 35 Years!

 Sep 24, 2014 Curatorial Insight
It seems appropriate, every so often, for a history museum to think about its own history. On September 24, 2014, we celebrate the 35th anniversary of our “grandfather”: the Digital Computer Museum that began in Marlboro Massachusetts in 1979. Read More
Microsoft Word for Windows Version 1.1a Source Code

Microsoft Word for Windows Version 1.1a Source Code

 Mar 25, 2014 From the Collection
The dominant word processing program for personal computers in the 1980s was DOS-based WordPerfect. Microsoft Word for DOS, which had been released in 1983, was an also-ran. Read More
Microsoft MS-DOS early source code

Microsoft MS-DOS early source code

 Mar 25, 2014 From the Collection
Rather than using IBM proprietary components developed for their many other computers, the IBM PC used industry standard commercial parts. That included adopting the Intel 8088 microprocessor as the heart of the computer. Read More
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