Articles in From the Collection(57)

Early Digital Research CP/M Source Code

Early Digital Research CP/M Source Code

David Laws Oct 01, 2014
By the time personal computers based on microprocessors began to emerge in the mid-1970s, programmers had been writing operating systems for about twenty years. Big mainframe computers had operating systems that were huge and complicated, created from hundreds of thousands of lines of code. But other operating systems, designed to fit in the small memory of minicomputers, were tiny. That was the kind that the PCs could use. Read More
The Cryotron: Extremely Rare Superconducting Digital Circuits Come to CHM

The Cryotron: Extremely Rare Superconducting Digital Circuits Come to CHM

David Brock Jul 31, 2014
In the early 1950s, a young, enthusiastic and creative electrical engineer named Dudley Buck left the National Security Agency (NSA) for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Buck had worked on some of the first electronic digital computers at the NSA, and in Massachusetts joined the large program to develop Whirlwind, a powerful, real-time digital computer. In addition, Buck began work toward a PhD. In his research Buck explored a variety of possible switches for use in digital computers as rivals to vacuum tubes and the new transistors. He looked at various magnetic and ferroelectric possibilities before becoming seized with the idea of creating a superconducting switch. Such a switch had the potential to be both tremendously fast and wonderfully low power. Read More
The Juniper M40 Router

The Juniper M40 Router

Guy Fedorkow Jun 23, 2014
Early in 2014, the Computer History Museum added a Juniper M40 router to its collection. This router, initially released in 1998, was the first internet router to use custom-designed silicon to accelerate the movement of internet traffic in the largest nation-wide internet backbone networks. The M40 launched a race that continues to this day: keeping ahead of the growth of internet traffic with highly-specialized silicon technology. Read More
IBM and the 1964 World’s Fair
Microsoft Word for Windows Version 1.1a Source Code

Microsoft Word for Windows Version 1.1a Source Code

Len Shustek Mar 25, 2014
The dominant word processing program for personal computers in the 1980s was DOS-based WordPerfect. Microsoft Word for DOS, which had been released in 1983, was an also-ran. Read More
Microsoft MS-DOS early source code

Microsoft MS-DOS early source code

Len Shustek Mar 25, 2014
Rather than using IBM proprietary components developed for their many other computers, the IBM PC used industry standard commercial parts. That included adopting the Intel 8088 microprocessor as the heart of the computer. Read More
Interacting with Oral Histories: A New Year, a New Way

Interacting with Oral Histories: A New Year, a New Way

Jennifer De La Cruz Feb 13, 2014
The number one question I get asked about oral histories is: “When will the video be available online?” Not, will the video be available online, but when. With instant video sharing made possible by websites like YouTube and Vimeo, in addition to mobile apps like Vine, it’s no longer a question of capability, but of time. Read More
Apple II DOS Source Code

Apple II DOS Source Code

Len Shustek Nov 12, 2013
Unlike the Apple I, the Apple II was fully assembled and ready to use with any display monitor. The version with 4K of memory cost $1298. It had color, graphics, sound, expansion slots, game paddles, and a built-in BASIC programming language. Read More
SRI ARC Journal: A Record of Engelbart and his Team

SRI ARC Journal: A Record of Engelbart and his Team

Sara Lott Aug 29, 2013
ARC was the laboratory started by Douglas Engelbart where the oNLine System (NLS), later Augment, was conceived. Read More
The Valley That Rudolph and Sletten Built

The Valley That Rudolph and Sletten Built

Jennifer De La Cruz Aug 16, 2013
The garage has long played host to the creative genius of aspiring technology entrepreneurs here in the good ole Valley de Silicon. Take, for example, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, who built the first Apple computers within the confines of Jobs’ parents’ Los Altos garage. There’s the famous HP duo, Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard, who began their company in 1939 out of Packard’s garage in Palo Alto. And then there’s Onslow H. “Rudy” Rudolph (1929–2008), who in 1959 started his own business in the family garage before being joined by his partner in crime, Ken Sletten, in 1962. Rudolph and Sletten are part of the garage start-up brotherhood, but they weren’t building computers. No. They were building a company for building companies, and would go on to construct multiple buildings, including some of the first corporate campuses, for the very same Silicon Valley companies that started-up in a garage. Read More
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