Artifact Details

Title

Early Generations of Computer Hardware at Livermore Labs, 1953-1975

Catalog Number

102639186

Type

Moving Image

Date

1998-03-31

Participants

Cole, Chuck, Speaker
Lafranchi, Edward, Speaker
Larsen, Cecilia, Speaker
Pehrson, Dave, Speaker
Wyman, Robert, Speaker

Publisher

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

Place of Publication

Mountain View, CA

Platform

VCR

Duration

01:14:00

Format

VHS

Description

This talk focuses on the various technologies deployed by computer manufacturers since the early 1950s and how these developments were reflected in the computing environment at Livermore Labs. As one of the nation's premier government laboratories, Livermore has often been the first in line to receive the most advanced computing systems of the day. In 1964, for example, it took delivery of S/N/ #1 of the CDC 6600, perhaps the signle most influential computer ever built. The 6600 set the standard for the next twenty years of supercomputer development and also marked the beginning of serious networking at Livermore, with the Octopus networking environment.

From Livermore's first Univac in 1953 (which used mercury delay line memory) to the Williams Tube memory in the IBM 701 and the core memory of the IBM 704, this talk presents five Livermore people's perspective on forty years of change in computational methods and machines.

Category

Talk

Series Title

Bay Area Computer History Perspectives