Artifact Details

Title

Challenges and Directions in Fault-Tolerant Computing, lecture by Jack Goldberg

Catalog Number

102645840

Type

Moving Image

Date

1985-10-02

Credits

Goldberg, Jack

Participants

Goldberg, Jack, speaker

Publisher

Stanford University. Stanford Computer Forum

Place of Publication

Palo Alto, CA, US

Identifying Numbers

Other number COMPAQ 0248880
Other number VIDEO SCF 01

Platform

NTSC VHS VCR

Format

VHS

Description

Label taped to the video case reads: "Two decaes of theoritical and experimental work and numerous recent successful applications have established fault tolerance as a standard objective of high speed, satisfaction of fault tolerance requirements cannot be demonstrated by testing alone, but requires formal analysis. Most of the work in fault tolerance has been concerned with developing effective design techniques. Recent work on reliabilitymodeling and formal proof of fault tolerant design and implementation is laying a foundation for a more rigorous design discipline. The scope of concern has also expanded to include any source of computer reliability, such as design mistakes, in software, hardware, or at any system level. Current art is barely able to keep up with the rapid pace of computer technology, the stresses of new applications and the new expansion in scope of concerns. Particular challenges lie in coping with the imperfections of the ultrasamll, i.e., high density VLSI, and the ultra-large, i.e., large software systems. It is clear that fault tolerance cannot be "added" to a design and must be integrated with other design objectives. Simultaneous demands in future systems for high performance, high security, high evolvability and high fault tolerance will require new theoretical models of computer systems and a much closer integration of practical design techniques. The talk will discuss the widening scope of research into computer dependability. New issues include tolerance of design errors (including software), operator errors, and the safety of computer-controlled systems."

Category

Lecture

Series Title

Stanford Computer Forum Distinguished Lecture Series