Adopt an Artifact

Adopt an Artifact

Computing, from Silicon Valley and beyond, has guided how we conduct business and socialize, influenced our global economy, and even shaped literature, film, games and various forms of entertainment. The Museum has built a world-class collection of rare and unique computers, software, texts, images and oral histories to preserve and interpret our rich, shared history.

You can personally connect with a historic artifact and support the Computer History Museum´s collections, exhibitions and interpretive programs by sponsoring conservation costs through the Adopt an Artifact program. Artifact adoptions are a creative, unique way to honor an individual through a gift adoption, perfect at any time of year.

Join us in preserving your legacy!

Benefits of Adoption

Gift levels begin at $50 and include a wide range of benefits:

$50-100

  • Certificate of adoption, including photo of artifact, description of significance
  • Credit for one year on the Adopt an Artifact webpage

$101-350

  • All of the above plus ...
  • Credit for 3 months in on-site lobby display of artifact
  • Before and After digital images

$351-750

  • All of the above plus ...
  • Invitation to a behind the scenes tour of the collection

$750+

  • All of the above plus ...
  • Private viewing of the artifact with curator and registrar

Full sponsorship

  • All of the above plus ...
  • Your adoption will be featured in an online story (@CHM blog, newsletter and Core magazine)
  • Permanent credit on artifact´s exhibition label and online catalog

Artifacts Available for Adoption

Rescue the Fox! Rescue the Fox!

Rescue the Fox!

The fox component sculpture is one of several originally designed and constructed for Honeywell Information Systems as part of their "The Other Computer Company" ad series. The ads, featured in Datamation from 1964-1978, were the brainchild of Boston's BBDO ad agency (akin to Mad Men's Sterling Cooper Draper Price).

Before arriving at the Museum, the fox suffered three broken legs and is "too weak" to stand on its own. In order to display the fox, along with its bison, grasshopper and chess pieces cohorts, the Museum is pursuing a thorough conservation treatment, including reversal of previous inadequate repairs, insertion of supports into legs, repairs of damaged foam base and a custom display mount.

Full sponsorship
available: $5,000

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Preserve J.M. Jacquard! Preserve J.M. Jacquard!

Preserve J.M. Jacquard!

In the early 1800s Joseph Marie (Charles) Jacquard, master weaver and silk merchant invented the programmable Jacquard loom, which automated the complicated and laborious process of weaving fabrics. Using long, connected strands of punched cards, his invention was highly successful and paved the way for other programmable machines, including, eventually, computers.

Dated 1839 and showing deterioration, the Museum's silk portrait of Jacquard requires removal of the weaving from the existing acidic backing board, washing by a professional conservator to neutralize acids and remove stains, remounting onto archival matting, plus glass and framing.

Full sponsorship
available: $3,200

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Repair the NCR 304! Repair the NCR 304!

Repair the NCR 304!

The 1950s and 60s saw a plethora of salesmen, including those pitching mainframe systems. Impossible to lug from one prospective buyer´s office to another, salesmen relied on models to show off the multiple components and technological advances of the newest single system. CHM recently acquired a near-complete model of a National Cash Register 304 system. Shown here with operator´s console, Teletype machine, card sorter, processor and just 4 of the 8 tape drives, one can imagine just how large a room this actual system would have occupied.

This model requires delicate and thorough cleaning and minor repairs. Re-adhesion of loose parts to all tape drives, the printer and the operator´s chair will be addressed.

Full sponsorship
available: $1,000

Donate Now

Additional Information

Full sponsorship costs noted reflect the actual costs of conservation treatment. In the event that the full sum of funds required is not raised, donations will be pooled to support the project(s) with the greatest need. Donor benefits may be adjusted accordingly.

Donors

ARTIFACT DONOR
The NCR 304 John C. Coffman
The NCR 304 Elmer Hoeksema – Sponsor

For More Information

TELEPHONE EMAIL
650-810-2730