Past Events

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2018 Events

Aug 15, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Technically Speaking
Tomorrow’s Computers: More Moore?
An Evening with Intel Senior Fellow Mark Bohr and DARPA’s Microsystems Technology Officer William Chappell
Join us as Center for Software History Director David C. Brock leads a conversation with Intel Senior Fellow and Director of Process Architecture and Integration Mark Bohr and Director of Microsystems Technology Office at DARPA William Chappell about the status of Moore’s Law, the limits of silicon, and the emerging alternative technologies that will shape the future of computing.
A single iPhone today has more power than the NASA computer that took astronauts to the moon. A smartwatch has more memory than computers that used to fill an entire room. So how did we get here? In 1965, Intel and Fairchild Semiconductor cofounder Gordon Moore predicted that the number of electronic components squeezed onto an integrated circuit will double each year. This bold observation, now widely known as Moore’s Law, has not only resulted in smaller, faster, and cheaper computer chips, but has also enabled the creation of life-changing technologies, from smartphones to spreadsheets. When Moore made his prediction, there were about 30 components on a chip and transistors cost about $8 .Today, billions of transistors fit on a chip the size of your fingernail and transistors cost a mere billionth of a penny.

However, computing companies have already reported that the rate of acceleration Moore predicted is slowing. In a 2015 interview with IEEE Spectrum, Moore himself predicted that we are approaching the limits of his observation. Could Moore’s Law truly come to an end and what could this mean for the future of technological innovation?

Join us as Center for Software History Director David C. Brock leads a conversation with Intel Senior Fellow and Director of Process Architecture and Integration Mark Bohr and Director of Microsystems Technology Office at DARPA William Chappell about the status of Moore’s Law, the limits of silicon, and the emerging alternative technologies that will shape the future of computing.
This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page.

The above will be preceded by the unveiling by IEEE 2017 President Karen Bartleson of an IEEE Milestone bronze plaque for Moore's Law.
Aug 15, 2018 3:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM and IEEE Present
Celebrating the Birthplace of Silicon Valley
Shockley Semiconductor Dedication at 2585 California St in Mountain View
Join early semiconductor pioneers, the president of the IEEE, and local officials on August 15 to commemorate this legendary Silicon Valley landmark. Guests are invited to enjoy a series of presentations and exhibits and view the stunning sculptures and plaques. In addition, an IEEE Milestone for "Birthplace of Silicon Valley" will be dedicated by IEEE President James Jefferies.
The scientists and engineers who worked at 391 San Antonio Road in Mountain View, California, laid the technological and cultural foundations for today’s Silicon Valley. Employing some of the most brilliant young minds in the business, Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory produced Northern California’s first silicon transistor prototypes in the mid-1950s. However, due to William Shockley’s difficult management style, eight Shockley employees—including Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce, Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Jean Hoerni, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, and Sheldon Roberts—resigned in September 1957 and founded Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation. Fairchild was the seedling from which companies valued at over $2 trillion have grown and the source of the integrated circuit “computer chip” that has revolutionized our world.

Now, nearly 70 years later, the site of Shockley Labs, already an IEEE Historical Milestone, is being formally recognized by the IEEE and the City of Mountain View for its historical significance in a special dedication ceremony on August 15. Thanks to the efforts of many, especially developer Merlone Geier Partners, newly commissioned public sculptures—in the likeness of two early semiconductor devices and a mammoth silicon crystal monument that symbolize the work to come out of the lab—now permanently mark the site, along with various plaques that describe and commemorate the site’s history.

The event’s featured speaker is Professor James F. Gibbons, former dean of engineering at Stanford University. Professor Gibbons’ first task at Stanford in 1957 was to work with Shockley and his team to transfer their knowledge of silicon fabrication to Stanford, which could in turn train future engineers for the coming boom in the semiconductor industry. He will share his personal experiences and memories of those early days.

Join early semiconductor pioneers, the president of the IEEE, and local officials on August 15 to commemorate this legendary Silicon Valley landmark. Guests are invited to enjoy a series of presentations and exhibits and view the stunning sculptures and plaques.

The event is free to attend and open to the public. Space is limited so please sign up to guarantee a seat. Location: 2585 California St, Mountain View, CA 94040 (Phase II of San Antonio Village) Free Parking.
Aug 11, 2018 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Educators' Edition featuring NEXMAP's David Cole
Special Edition
This special event welcomes classroom and community educators to a fun-filled day exploring cross-curricular applications of computer programming concepts. Educators will be introduced to Raspberry Pi technology, learn about CHM’s education resources, and discover meaningful strategies for incorporating computer science and computer history into a wide variety of learning environments. Participants will network and share ideas with classroom, community, and museum educators while exploring new concepts to take back to their students and communities.
This special event welcomes classroom and community educators to a fun-filled day exploring cross-curricular applications of computer programming concepts.

Educators will be introduced to Raspberry Pi technology, learn about CHM’s education resources, and discover meaningful strategies for incorporating computer science and computer history into a wide variety of learning environments. Participants will network and share ideas with classroom, community, and museum educators while exploring new concepts to take back to their students and communities.

Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a one-day event that provides engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. This event will feature a keynote "rock star" speaker from the education field who will explore their personal and professional journey and share insights that help to inspire curiosity and confidence in cross-curricular applications of technology.

Please note that this event is for classroom and community educators interested in learning more about technology and discovering ways to creatively incorporate it into their learning environments. No prior computer programming experience is required.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable fee per individual participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Aug 3, 2018 5:00 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
General Magic
Film Screening and Panel Discussion with Marc Porat, Andy Hertzfeld, Megan Smith, and Bill Atkinson
Voted one of the top ten films of Tribeca 2018 by Time Out Magazine, GENERAL MAGIC is a feature documentary about how great vision and epic failure changed the world as we now know it. Join us for a special screening followed by a panel discussion featuring former General Magic employees featured in the film.
Voted one of the top ten films of Tribeca 2018 by Time Out Magazine, GENERAL MAGIC is a feature documentary about how great vision and epic failure changed the world as we now know it.

From the smartphones that sit in our pockets to an array of technologies we take for granted today, many of the ideas that now dominate the tech industry and our day-to-day lives were born in 1989 at a Silicon Valley startup most of us have never heard of - General Magic.

The first smartphones, social media, e-commerce, touchscreen, and even the beloved emojis all had their origins at General Magic . But this was before the internet, before 3G, before Google, and when only a few people had mobile phones. The world was not ready in 1995 to hold the world in its hands.

Extraordinary creativity, remarkable breakthroughs, fierce competition, hubris and heartbreaking betrayal dominated behind the scenes of General Magic. While some never recovered from the failure that accompanied its downfall and bankruptcy, others went on to soar. The lessons learned at General Magic were instrumental in the creation of the iPod, iPhone, Android, eBay, even in the corridors of President Obama’s White House. And although General Magic died, the concepts and the people who worked there went on to change how the world connects today.

Described by Forbes as “The most important dead company in Silicon Valley” and combining rare archive footage with contemporary stories of the General Magicians today, this documentary tracks the progress of anytime, anywhere communication from a thing of sci-fi fiction to our modern day reality.

Join us for a special screening of this fascinating documentary followed by a panel discussion with former "magicians" Marc Porat, Andy Hertzfeld, Bill Atkinson and Megan Smith.

To learn more about the film, please visit General Magic Movie. Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative cuisine from CateredToo, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.
Jul 28, 2018 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
Lights, Circuits, Action! Family Workshop
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. There is a $10.00 non-refundable registration fee per family participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Emily Stupfel (estupfel@computerhistory.org).

Advance registration is required.
Jul 25, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Inside the Transformation
Quantum Questions
Microsoft Research’s Matthias Troyer, Google Quantum AI Lab’s John Martinis & IBM Research’s Pat Gumann
Microsoft Principal Researcher Matthias Troyer, Google Quantum AI Lab Member John Martinis, and IBM Research Staff Member Pat Gumann join Center for Software History Director David C. Brock to discuss the history of quantum computing, their current work, and predictions for the future.
Imagine an entirely new kind of computer based on the surprising physics of the quantum world. They leave digital computing behind in order to solve some incredibly complex calculations in a flash. Such a machine could leave our most powerful digital supercomputers behind for modeling everything from molecules to the climate, changing the way we understand our planet, develop medicines, crack codes, and analyze financial markets. This is the vision for quantum computing.

Academic research labs, startups, and tech giants are all making significant bets on making quantum computing a reality. But what exactly is quantum computing and what distinguishes it from the computers we use today? What are the different approaches to making a quantum computer? Have any been made? What impact could quantum computing have on our lives?

Join us as Center for Software History Director David C. Brock leads a conversation with researchers from Google, IBM, and Microsoft about the history, the science, and the future applications of quantum computing.

This event is produced by the Center for Software History @ CHM.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page.
Jul 20, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
Science Slam: Computing & Anthropology, Astronomy and More
Series of Short Presentations from the Wonderfest Science Envoys
We’re teaming up with Wonderfest to explore the role of technology in scientific fields like astronomy, anthropology and more! Through a series of short, informal presentations, you will meet 5 young PhD students committed to increasing public understanding and awareness of science.
We’re teaming up with Wonderfest to explore the role of technology in scientific fields like astronomy, anthropology and more! Through a series of short, informal presentations, you will meet 5 young PhD students committed to increasing public understanding and awareness of science. All of our featured speakers are part of Wonderfest’s Science Envoys program, which helps budding researchers develop public outreach and presentation skills.

Wonderfest’s mission is to inspire and nurture a deep sense of wonder about the world. Wonderfest programs stimulate curiosity, promote careful reasoning, challenge unexamined beliefs, and encourage lifelong learning. Wonderfest achieves these ends through public science gatherings in the San Francisco Bay Area and through online science discourse & video that reach around the world.
Jun 22, 2018 5:00 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
Teen Takeover: Power Up the Future
The Teen Engagement Council at CHM fosters collaboration among teens to create, coordinate, execute, and promote events by teens for teens. “Power Up the Future” is a pilot event aimed at paving the way for increased teen participation at the Computer History Museum.
Food. Music. Prizes. The Teen Engagement Council is proud to present “Power Up the Future,” the Computer History Museum’s first-ever teen takeover. Join us at the Museum after-hours on June 22 from 5 to 9 p.m. for a fun-filled night packed with activities, prizes, food, and music.

“Power Up the Future” is a free event coordinated by the Museum’s new Teen Engagement Council. This event aims to empower teens through an exploration of the past and present of computing to provide a gateway into the future. Explore past technology, discuss present ventures, and imagine the future. See how technology is used throughout countless fields such as art, music, politics, and medicine. Engage in activities with your friends and explore the wonders of the Computer History Museum. “Power Up the Future” will show you how cool it really is to be a geek!

The Teen Engagement Council at CHM fosters collaboration among teens to create, coordinate, execute, and promote events by teens for teens. “Power Up the Future” is a pilot event aimed at paving the way for increased teen participation at the Computer History Museum.

Register through Eventbrite or through the link below and receive 15% off at our Museum Store. Offer valid for this event only.
Jun 20, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Inside the Transformation
Techtonic Shift: China's Rise in Venture Capital and Tech
NEA’s Carmen Chang and GGV Capital's Hans Tung in Conversation with the Exponential Center's Marguerite Gong Hancock
Remember when "Made in China" was synonymous with a cheap toy or electronic knockoff? Those days are long over. Chinese tech firms, once seen as quaint or copycats, now have Alibaba, Tencent, and Ant Financial counted in the world's top 10 most valuable internet companies, alongside Alphabet, Facebook, and Amazon. And the country's tech economy is taking on, and beating, global rivals. Uber China was bought out by Didi Chuxing in 2016, Tencent's WeChat ecosystem is more ubiquitous than Facebook Messenger, and Chinese bike-sharing companies have recently spawned copycats in the heart of Silicon Valley. Chinese founders are pushing the edge with new business models and disruptive innovations . . . and venture capitalists from both sides of the Pacific are shifting investments in a big way with important implications.

What are the underlying trends driving this techtonic shift? Who are the people and companies to watch? What are the opportunities and challenges for investors and firms in China, Silicon Valley, and beyond?

Join us on Wednesday, June 20, 2018, as leading venture capitalists Carmen Chang, chairman and head, Asia at NEA and Hans Tung, managing partner of GGV Capital, speak with the Exponential Center's Marguerite Gong Hancock about the underlying drivers and implications of the techtonic shift of China's rise in venture capital and tech.
Remember when "Made in China" was synonymous with a cheap toy or electronic knockoff? Those days are long over. Chinese tech firms, once seen as quaint or copycats, now have Alibaba, Tencent, and Ant Financial counted in the world's top 10 most valuable internet companies, alongside Alphabet, Facebook, and Amazon. And the country's tech economy is taking on, and beating, global rivals. Uber China was bought out by Didi Chuxing in 2016, Tencent's WeChat ecosystem is more ubiquitous than Facebook Messenger, and Chinese bike-sharing companies have recently spawned copycats in the heart of Silicon Valley. Chinese founders are pushing the edge with new business models and disruptive innovations . . . and venture capitalists from both sides of the Pacific are shifting investments in a big way with important implications.

During the past decade, China's share of global venture capital investment has risen from 5 percent to 24 percent. Last year China topped global venture spending in artificial intelligence at 48 percent of $12 billion globally in 2017, compared with the United States at 38 percent. China now accounts for more than 25 percent of the global unicorn companies valued at more than $1 billion. And the US National Science Board predicts that R&D spending in China will outpace the US by next year.

What are the underlying trends driving this techtonic shift? Who are the people and companies to watch? What are the opportunities and challenges for investors and firms in China, Silicon Valley, and beyond?

Carmen Chang, pioneer tech deal maker in China, and Hans Tung, ranked #20 on this year’s Forbes Midas List, are two of the leading venture capitalists deeply involved in bridging Silicon Valley and China. Chang led many seminal deals in China, spanning transactions with Lenovo, Foxconn, and Tencent, as well as IPOs of SMIC, Speadtrum, and others. Tung counts 11 unicorns in his portfolio today, including Meili, Wish, Slack, and Airbnb, as well as Xiaomi, underway for an IPO this summer, the biggest in the global pipeline for 2018.

Join us on Wednesday, June 20, 2018, as leading venture capitalists Carmen Chang, chairman and head, Asia at NEA and Hans Tung, managing partner of GGV Capital, speak with the Exponential Center's Marguerite Gong Hancock about the underlying drivers and implications of the techtonic shift of China's rise in venture capital and tech.
Jun 16, 2018 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
Make Software Family Workshop
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. There is a $10.00 non-refundable registration fee per family participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Emily Stupfel (estupfel@computerhistory.org).

Advance registration is required.
Jun 10, 2018 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Father's Day Edition featuring Carbon's Greg Robbins & O-Watch CEO Omkar Govil-Nair
Special Edition
This special event welcomes middle school students and their fathers to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. Students and their dads will learn with and from each other as they take on new challenges and gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators. This event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.
This special event welcomes middle school students and their fathers to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. Students and their dads will learn with and from each other as they take on new challenges and gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators. This event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explore their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Please note that this event is for fathers and their students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable fee per individual participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
May 23, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Inside the Transformation
Medicine in the Digital Age
ICHS Director at UCSF Atul Butte in Conversation with the Verge's Elizabeth Lopatto
Healthcare has entered the digital age. You can track your heart rate with wearable devices like Fitbit or Motiv. Smartphones send patients reminders to take their medication. And according to the CDC, 86.9 percent of office-based physicians are using electronic health records. However...
Healthcare has entered the digital age. You can track your heart rate with wearable devices like Fitbit or Motiv. Smartphones send patients reminders to take their medication. And according to the CDC, 86.9 percent of office-based physicians are using electronic health records. However, many medical professionals and technologists alike believe tech can take medicine a lot further. As hospitals and doctors adopt a more data-driven approach to diagnosing and treating patients, what benefits and challenges do they face? How do practitioners learn how to capture and analyze data so it can be applied in the operating room? And what security and privacy concerns do these new approaches present?

Dr. Atul Butte, director of the Institute for Computational Health Sciences at UCSF, talks with the Verge’s Senior Editor Elizabeth Lopatto about the latest advancements in precision medicine and why data is key to finding a better way to provide healthcare. This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page.
May 16, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Inside the Transformation
Fire and Fuel: Founders and Funders
In Conversation with Floodgate Venture Capitalist Ann Miura-Ko & TaskRabbit Founder Leah Busque
How do a founder and a funder take an idea and build a pioneering company? Before there was Uber or Airbnb, TaskRabbit helped birth the sharing economy. Leah Busque’s entrepreneurial fire has taken her from IBM software engineer to founder of TaskRabbit to venture capitalist. Ann Miura-Ko is a star early-stage funder, advisor, and mentor who has fueled the growth of disruptive firms. Their partnership propelled TaskRabbit from early concept and pivoting to scaling in 40 markets before it was acquired by IKEA in 2017.

Join us on Wednesday, May 16, 2018, as venture capitalist Ann Miura-Ko and Leah Busque, founder of TaskRabbit and now general parter at Fuel Capital, speak with the Exponential Center’s Marguerite Gong Hancock about pursuing audacious goals, igniting high impact teams, scaling companies, facing dark moments, creating productive partnerships, and hacking value.
How do a founder and a funder take an idea and build a pioneering company? Before there was Uber or Airbnb, TaskRabbit helped birth the sharing economy. Leah Busque’s entrepreneurial fire has taken her from IBM software engineer to founder of TaskRabbit to venture capitalist. Ann Miura-Ko is a star early-stage funder, advisor, and mentor who has fueled the growth of disruptive firms. Their partnership propelled TaskRabbit from early concept and pivoting to scaling in 40 markets before it was acquired by IKEA in 2017.

On a cold winter night in 2008, Leah Busque realized she was out of dog food. What if she could create a way to find and pay someone in her Boston neighborhood to run the errand? After coding for 10 weeks straight, she finished the website for her startup that became the online marketplace TaskRabbit.

Leah moved to Silicon Valley and connected with funder and advisor Ann Miura-Ko. A technologist turned venture capitalist, Ann took an early bet on TaskRabbit then served on the firm’s board for many years. She has been founding investor board member for other successful firms from Lyft to Modcloth, earning her a place on the 2017 Midas List of top 100 venture capitalists.

Join us on Wednesday, May 16, 2018, as venture capitalist Ann Miura-Ko and Leah Busque, founder of TaskRabbit and general partner at Fuel Capital, speak with the Exponential Center’s Marguerite Gong Hancock about pursuing audacious goals, igniting high impact teams, scaling companies, facing dark moments, creating productive partnerships, and hacking value.

This event is produced by the Exponential Center @CHM.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page.
May 12, 2018 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Mother's Day Edition Featuring Genentech's Jennifer Turcotte
Special Edition
This special event welcomes middle school students and their mothers to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. Students and their moms will learn with and from each other as they take on new challenges and gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators. This event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.
This special event welcomes middle school students and their mothers to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. Students and their moms will learn with and from each other as they take on new challenges and gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators. This event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explore their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Please note that this event is for mothers and their students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable fee per individual participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
May 11, 2018 6:30 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
California Typewriter
Film Screening and Q&A with Director Doug Nichol and Sculptor Jeremy Mayer
California Typewriter is a documentary portrait of artists, writers, and collectors who remain steadfastly loyal to the typewriter as a tool and muse, featuring Tom Hanks, John Mayer, David McCullough, Sam Shepard, and others. Join us for this special screening followed by a Q&A with Doug Nichol, the film’s director and Jeremy Mayer, a sculptor who uses typewriter parts to create life-size human figures.
California Typewriter is a documentary portrait of artists, writers, and collectors who remain steadfastly loyal to the typewriter as a tool and muse, featuring Tom Hanks, John Mayer, David McCullough, Sam Shepard, and others. It also movingly documents the struggles of California Typewriter, one of the last standing repair shops in America dedicated to keeping the aging machines clicking. In the process, the film delivers a thought-provoking meditation on the changing dynamic between humans and machines, and encourages us to consider our own relationship with technology, old and new, as the digital age's emphasis on speed and convenience redefines who's serving whom, human or machine?

Join us for this special screening followed by a Q&A with Doug Nichol, the film’s director and Jeremy Mayer, a sculptor who uses typewriter parts to create life-size human figures.

Watch film trailer here. Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy food and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits are open from 5 to 9 p.m.
May 6, 2018 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
Design The Future Family Workshop
A computer pioneer once told Steve Jobs, “You can’t really understand what’s going on now unless you understand what came before.” In this workshop, participants will explore important innovations in computer history to help them imagine and design technologies for the future. Their future innovations may someday be part of history!
A computer pioneer once told Steve Jobs, “You can’t really understand what’s going on now unless you understand what came before.” In this workshop, participants will explore important innovations in computer history to help them imagine and design technologies for the future. Their future innovations may someday be part of history!

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. There is a $10.00 non-refundable registration fee per family participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Emily Stupfel (estupfel@computerhistory.org).

Advance registration is required.
Apr 22, 2018 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build in partnership with Girl Scouts of Northern California featuring Simplexity Founder Aisha Sheikh
Level 2: Intermediate
This Special Intermediate Edition of Design_Code_Build is open to all Girl Scouts currently enrolled in grades 6 through 8. Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.
This Special Intermediate Edition of Design_Code_Build is open to all Girl Scouts currently enrolled in grades 6 through 8. Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explore their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Please note that this event is in partnership with Girl Scouts of Northern California, and is suitable for girls in grades 6 through 8. This is an intermediate level of Design_Code_Build, designed for students who have previous programming experience, or who have attended a Design_Code_Build event in the past.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
This program is made in coordination with the Girls Scouts of Northern California.

Girl Scouts STEM
Apr 21, 2018 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
Make Software Family Workshop
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. There is a $10.00 non-refundable registration fee per family participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Emily Stupfel (estupfel@computerhistory.org).

Advance registration is required.
Apr 20, 2018 5:30 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
AI Download with SVAI
Series of Short Presentations from Researchers, Academics, AI Experts & More
We’re teaming up with Silicon Valley Artificial Intelligence (SVAI) for their second annual AI Download. Learn more about AI from the perspectives of engineers, researchers, scientists, startup founders, and many others. Intended to be a broad survey of AI activity happening across the Bay Area, this event will highlight academic research, learning resources, community initiatives and compelling work happening at the Valley’s leading AI companies.
We’re teaming up with Silicon Valley Artificial Intelligence (SVAI) for their second annual AI Download. Learn more about AI from the perspectives of engineers, researchers, scientists, startup founders, and many others. Intended to be a broad survey of AI activity happening across the Bay Area, this event will highlight academic research, learning resources, community initiatives and compelling work happening at the Valley’s leading AI companies.

The program features two sessions. In the first session, presenters will give a short overview of their artificial intelligence and machine learning projects. In the second session, speakers will provide a more technical view of their work.

Following the two sessions, audience members and presenters will have an opportunity to connect and share what they need to continue and expand their work.

Here is a sneak peek at some of the speakers presenting:

Noor Siddiqui, Stanford University Student interested in using CS to better understand the code for life (DNA) and in engineering healthier humans.

Brandon White, Senior Machine Learning Engineer at Freenome.

Ajay Shah, Cofounder and CEO of CytoVale.

Laura Montoya, Founder and Executive Director of Accel.AI.

For a complete speaker lineup, please visit the SVAI website. More speakers will be announced there in the coming weeks.

About SVAI
SVAI is a San Francisco-based non-profit that organizes scientific lectures and collaborative research gatherings focused on tackling the biggest challenges facing the life sciences. Their mission is to accelerate biomedical research and educate through open collaboration in computational science. SVAI brings together engineers, scientists, researchers, members of the startup community interested in artificial intelligence and its potential impact on medicine and biology.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum. Open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative cuisine from CateredToo and patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden.
Apr 12, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live on the Road
SpaceToday NightLife
A Series of Conversations on Space Exploration & Technology
We are taking CHM Live on the road! Join us at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco for their weekly NightLife program. We are discussing how scientists, entrepreneurs and technologists are teaming up to take us further into space than ever before.
We are taking CHM Live on the road. Join us at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco for their weekly NightLife program.

As private space companies like SpaceX and Blue Origin have blasted into public consciousness, entrepreneurs and scientists are identifying new industries and business opportunities that could emerge as we get further in space than ever before. Companies are forming around fields like asteroid mining, satellite technology, space tourism and more--and venture capitalists are taking notice.

We are holding two back-to-back conversations on what it’s like to work at a space startup and the business opportunities created by the private space race. First, Planetary Resources CEO Chris Lewicki will discuss asteroid mining and how it could enable future space exploration initiatives. Then, NanoRacks VP of Space Opportunities Ron Goedendorp joins us to discuss how his company is becoming “the operating system of space”. Both conversations will be moderated by The Verge’s Science Editor Elizabeth Lopatto.

For more information about NightLife at the California Academy of Sciences visit their website here.

Click here or on the registration link below to purchase tickets for this event.

Ticket Price: $15 (non-members of Cal Academy)
Ticket Price: $12 (Cal Academy Members Only) This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page.
Apr 7, 2018 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build featuring TechCorp Solutions' Oscar Fernandez
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Lily Cordero.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Apr 5, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live on the Road
SpaceAge NightLife
A Conversation about Computing throughout Space Race History
We are taking CHM Live on the road! Join us at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco for their weekly Nightlife program. We will be exploring the role of computing in Space Race history with historians and authors.
We are taking CHM Live on the road! Join us at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco for their weekly Nightlife program.

On July 21st, 1969, 600 million people flocked to their televisions to watch the history-making moment when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin set foot on the moon. This was more than just a giant leap for mankind, it also marked an unprecedented technological feat made possible by computers, both human and machine. What role did computing play during the lunar missions? How did NASA scientists develop the technologies that got astronauts to the moon -- and back?

We will discuss these questions and more with historian Glenn Bugos and Solar System Ambassador Frank O'Brien. This conversation about technology and the Space Race will be moderated by Center for Software History Director David C. Brock.


For more information about NightLife at the California Academy of Sciences visit their website here.

Click here or on the registration link below to purchase tickets for this event.

Ticket Price: $15 (non-members of Cal Academy)
Ticket Price: $12 (Cal Academy Members Only)
This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page.
Mar 24, 2018 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build in partnership with Girl Scouts of Northern California featuring NASA's Lindsay Westerfield
Level 1: Introductory
This Special Introductory Edition of Design_Code_Build is open to all Girl Scouts currently enrolled in grades 6 through 8. Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.
This Special Introductory Edition of Design_Code_Build is open to all Girl Scouts currently enrolled in grades 6 through 8. Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explore their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Please note that this introductory program is in partnership with Girl Scouts of Northern California, and is suitable for girls in grades 6 through 8.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
This program is made in coordination with the Girls Scouts of Northern California.

Girl Scouts STEM
Mar 17, 2018 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
Lights, Circuits, Action! Family Workshop
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. There is a $10.00 non-refundable registration fee per family participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Emily Stupfel (estupfel@computerhistory.org).

Advance registration is required.
Mar 15, 2018 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Technically Speaking
Minitel: The Web before the Web
Authors Kevin Driscoll & Julien Mailland in Conversation with Internet History Program Curatorial Director Marc Weber
A decade before the web began taking the rest of us online, France was fully connected. By 1984, six million citizens were reading newspapers, sending emails, buying train tickets, paying taxes and engaging in scandalous chat on the Minitel system. That usage grew to over half of the country's population of 60 million by the early 1990s, most tapping away on home terminals offered for free by the French phone company. At its peak, there were over 25,000 sites to choose from and the system wasn’t fully shut down until 2012. How did this first mass online world emerge, and shape the Internet we use today?
A decade before the web began taking the rest of us online, France was fully connected. By 1984, six million citizens were reading newspapers, sending emails, buying train tickets, paying taxes and engaging in scandalous chat on the Minitel system. That usage grew to over half of the country's population of 60 million by the early 1990s, most tapping away on home terminals offered for free by the French phone company. At its peak, there were over 25,000 sites to choose from and the system wasn’t fully shut down until 2012. How did this first mass online world emerge, and shape the internet we use today? Why did Minitel and its parent Videotex standard fail beyond France—and what lessons does that history hold for today’s online pioneers?

Join Marc Weber, curatorial director of the Museum’s Internet History Program, as he explores these questions with Julien Mailland and Kevin Driscoll. Mailland and Driscoll are the authors of Minitel: Welcome to the Internet, published by MIT Press in June 2017.

This event is produced by CHM’s Internet History Program. This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Mar 10, 2018 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build featuring Present Company Co-Founder Janete Perez
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explore their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explore their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this introductory program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins directly, crobbins@computerhistory.org.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Feb 28, 2018 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Technically Speaking
Press Play: The Origins of QuickTime
A Panel Discussion with Members of the Original Apple QuickTime Development Team—Doug Camplejohn, Peter Hoddie & Bruce Leak
Join us as Center for Software History curator Hansen Hsu leads a conversation with members of the original QuickTime team about the creation of QuickTime, its evolution, and its impact on the computer and media industries.
From Hollywood blockbusters to social media cat videos, the ability to record, edit and play video on mobile devices and personal computers has changed the way we consume and produce moving images. 25 years ago, this technology was in its infancy. In 1991, Apple released QuickTime, the first mass-market digital video software for personal computers. QuickTime is a multimedia platform for developers to add audiovisual recording, editing, and playback to their applications. Because it was built into the Macintosh operating system, users did not need to buy more hardware or software to play video. QuickTime became the most widespread media format on PCs after Apple brought it to Windows, and its incorporation into the MPEG-4 standard, used in every cell phone, computer, and set top video player today, cemented Apple’s position as a leading provider of media creation technology. How was QuickTime created? What role did it play in Apple’s history? And what impact does it have today?

Join us as Center for Software History curator Hansen Hsu leads a conversation with members of the original QuickTime team about the creation of QuickTime, its evolution, and its impact on the computer and media industries.
This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Feb 23, 2018 6:30 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
The Commodore Story
Film Screening and Q&A with Bil Herd, Leonard Tramiel & Ron Nicholson
The Commodore Story is a two-hour documentary film that takes audiences through Commodore's world-changing evolution from the 1970s to the 1990s; from the PET, Vic20, and C64 to the Amiga and beyond. The film includes interviews with legends from the Commodore and Amiga years. You will also see footage of the rare C65 and learn more about the wave of new Commodore-related products that are hitting the market today. Join us for this special screening followed by a Q&A with pioneers Bil Herd, Leonard Tramiel, and Ron Nicholson.
The Commodore Story is a two-hour documentary film that takes audiences through Commodore's world-changing evolution from the 1970s to the 1990s; from the PET, Vic20, and C64 to the Amiga and beyond. The film includes interviews with legends from the Commodore and Amiga years. You will also see footage of the rare C65 and learn more about the wave of new Commodore-related products that are hitting the market today. Join us for this special screening followed by a Q&A with pioneers Bil Herd, Leonard Tramiel, and Ron Nicholson.
Feb 15, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Inside the Transformation
Our Brain’s Development in a Technological World
In Conversation with Neuroscientist Adam Gazzaley, Professor Mary Helen Immordino-Yang & Research Psychologist Larry Rosen
What happens to the brain throughout our lives when you replace tangible experiences with technological ones? When we switch physical books with Kindles and iPads? Or regularly multitask between responding to emails on the computer and texts on our smartphones? As computing becomes increasingly pervasive in our lives, we will discuss the possible benefits and potential detriments technology has on cognitive development.
The brain is composed of about 100 billion unconnected neurons when we are born. As we grow, our early experiences - hearing caregivers’ voices during infancy, solving simple puzzles, reading books before bedtime- determine the neurological connections and pathways that are formed. Neuroscientists believe the majority of essential brain development occurs in the initial years of a child’s life. However, cognitive growth takes place throughout our entire lives, including the loss of unused connections throughout adolescence or the creation of new neural connections in an adult brain when learning a new skill.

So, what happens to the brain throughout our lives when you replace tangible experiences with technological ones? When we switch physical books with Kindles and iPads? Or regularly multitask between responding to emails on the computer and texts on our smartphones? As computing becomes increasingly pervasive in our lives, we will discuss the possible benefits and potential detriments technology has on cognitive development.

Join us as the Mercury News science reporter Lisa Krieger leads a conversation with experts in neuroscience, education, and psychology to explore how the consumption of technology is impacting our brains.
This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Feb 3, 2018 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
I <3 Software Family Workshop
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software on communication, use Raspberry Pi technology to create Valentine messages for family members, and learn how they can communicate with computers to make things happen in the real world.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software on communication, use Raspberry Pi technology to create Valentine messages for family members, and learn how they can communicate with computers to make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. There is a $10.00 non-refundable registration fee per family participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Emily Stupfel

Advance registration is required.
Jan 31, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Inside the Transformation
Driving Change
Uber Chief Brand Officer Bozoma Saint John in Conversation with the Verge's Senior Technology Editor Lauren Goode
After a year of challenges and controversies, Uber is turning to Bozoma Saint John to upgrade its image. Hired in June 2017 as the company’s Chief Brand Officer, Saint John is tasked with telling the stories of its millions of riders and drivers across 600 cities. A seasoned advertising and marketing executive, Saint John has held leadership roles at Apple Music and Pepsi. She sits down with the Verge's Senior Technology Editor Lauren Goode to discuss her background and career, the challenges she’s facing as she leads the effort to change Uber’s image and insights about the future of the ride-sharing company.
2017 was a year of challenges and controversies for Uber. In February, former engineer Susan Fowler published a blog post describing the sexual harassment and gender bias she faced at the company, causing Uber to launch an investigation of its culture. Google’s self-driving car unit, Waymo, sued Uber for alleged intellectual property theft. The New York Times published an expose detailing how Uber used a software tool called “greyball” to elude law enforcement in cities where the ridesharing service was limited or banned. Many senior executives left the company, culminating in the resignation of longtime CEO and cofounder Travis Kalanick in June.

Now the company is turning to Bozoma Saint John to upgrade its image. Hired in June 2017 as the company’s Chief Brand Officer, Saint John is tasked with telling the stories of its millions of riders and drivers across 600 cities. A seasoned advertising and marketing executive, Saint John has held leadership roles at Apple Music and Pepsi. She sits down with the Verge's Senior Technology Editor Lauren Goode to discuss her background and career, the challenges she’s facing as she leads the effort to change Uber’s image and insights about the future of the ride-sharing company. This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Jan 20, 2018 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
Lights, Circuits, Action! Family Workshop
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. There is a $10.00 non-refundable registration fee per family participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Emily Stupfel

Advance registration is required.
Jan 17, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Silicon Valley: The Untold Story
Legendary Silicon Valley figures share their takes on the new documentary series Silicon Valley: The Untold Story. WhatsApp cofounder Jan Koum, technology entrepreneur Kim Polese, DFJ venture capitalist Heidi Roizen, Apple cofounder Steve "Woz" Wozniak, and award-winning director Michael Schwarz who all participated in the making of the film will discuss the Valley’s evolution and offer commentary on selected clips. Following the panel discussion, be the first to view a special premiere of the first segment in the series: "Secret Sauce."
Around the world, people want to know what it is about Silicon Valley that has made it a hotbed of innovation and entrepreneurship for decades. Silicon Valley: The Untold Story, a new three-part documentary airing January 28 on the Science Channel, will uncover the story. The Computer History Museum is hosting a premiere event with a panel discussion featuring participants in the film, including WhatsApp cofounder Jan Koum, technology entrepreneur Kim Polese, DFJ venture capitalist Heidi Roizen, Apple cofounder Steve "Woz" Wozniak, and award-winning director Michael Schwarz. They will provide their own unique takes on the Valley, discuss brief clips from film segments, and answer questions from the audience. A screening of the first segment in the series, "Secret Sauce", will follow the panel.

The series provides television's first comprehensive look at the century-and-a-half history of this fascinating region. It includes interviews with such key Valley figures as Apple cofounder Steve "Woz" Wozniak, WhatsApp co-founder Jan Koum, and Alphabet chairman Eric Schmidt, as well as with leading historians. The first hour explores the unique mix of ingredients-the secret sauce-that fueled the Valley's rise to becoming the world's technological and economic powerhouse. The second hour examines the forces-including government and military funding-that have made the Valley a magnet for innovators from all over the world. And the third hour charts the circuitous paths and lucky accidents that lie behind some of the Valley's greatest success stories, and reveals that even in a place celebrated for inventing the future, no one can really predict it. The series is supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The Computer History Museum is the community and educational outreach partner for the project.

Join us to hear what these legendary leaders have to say about a place that created the world as we know it and be the first to view the new documentary.
Watch Silicon Valley: The Untold Story trailer here

Silicon Valley: The Untold Story premieres in March 2018 p.m. on Science Channel.
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2017 Events

Dec 17, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
Design The Future Family Workshop
A computer pioneer once told Steve Jobs, “You can’t really understand what’s going on now unless you understand what came before.” In this workshop, participants will explore important innovations in computer history to help them imagine and design technologies for the future. Their future innovations may someday be part of history!
A computer pioneer once told Steve Jobs, “You can’t really understand what’s going on now unless you understand what came before.” In this workshop, participants will explore important innovations in computer history to help them imagine and design technologies for the future. Their future innovations may someday be part of history!

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Dec 13, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Troublemakers: The Story of Silicon Valley's Coming of Age
Historian and Author Leslie Berlin in Conversation with Museum’s Marguerite Gong Hancock
In Troublemakers, historian Leslie Berlin introduces the people and stories behind the birth of the Internet and the microprocessor, as well as Apple, Atari, Genentech, Xerox PARC, ROLM, ASK, and the iconic venture capital firms Sequoia Capital and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. In the space of only seven years and thirty-five miles, five major industries—personal computing, video games, biotechnology, modern venture capital, and advanced semiconductor logic—were born.
“Leslie Berlin is a master historian of Silicon Valley, and the publication of this book is a landmark event. Kaleidoscopic, ambitious and brilliant the book draws on the dazzling case of the characters to chart the rise of the five industries that have come to define technology today, and collectively, to remake the world.”

-Eric Schmidt, Former CEO of Google and Executive Chairman of Alphabet, Inc.

The richly told narrative of the Silicon Valley generation that launched five major high-tech industries in seven years, laying the foundation for today’s technology-driven world.

At a time when the five most valuable companies on the planet are high-tech firms and nearly half of Americans say they cannot live without their cell phones, Troublemakers reveals the untold story of how we got here. This is the gripping tale of seven exceptional men and women, pioneers of Silicon Valley in the 1970s and early 1980s. Together, they worked across generations, industries, and companies to bring technology from Pentagon offices and university laboratories to the rest of us. In doing so, they changed the world.

In Troublemakers: The Story of Silicon Valley's Coming of Age, historian Leslie Berlin introduces the people and stories behind the birth of the Internet and the microprocessor, as well as Apple, Atari, Genentech, Xerox PARC, ROLM, ASK, and the iconic venture capital firms Sequoia Capital and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. In the space of only seven years and thirty-five miles, five major industries—personal computing, video games, biotechnology, modern venture capital, and advanced semiconductor logic—were born.

Featured among well-known Silicon Valley innovators like Steve Jobs, Regis McKenna, Larry Ellison, and Don Valentine are Mike Markkula, the underappreciated chairman of Apple who owned one-third of the company; Bob Taylor, who kick-started the Arpanet and masterminded the personal computer; software entrepreneur Sandra Kurtzig, the first woman to take a technology company public; Bob Swanson, the co-founder of Genentech; Al Alcorn, the Atari engineer behind the first wildly successful video game; Fawn Alvarez, who rose from an assembler on a factory line to the executive suite; and Niels Reimers, the Stanford administrator who changed how university innovations reach the public. Together, these troublemakers rewrote the rules and invented the future.

Join us as Leslie Berlin sits down with Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to discuss her new book Troublemakers, a rich narrative of Silicon Valley’s birth and coming of age and the hidden figures behind the technologies that changed your life.


This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory. We are pleased to have Books Inc. onsite selling copies of Troublemakers: The Story of Silicon Valley's Coming of Age before and after the program.

About the Exponential Center @CHM
This event is produced by the Exponential Center @CHM. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Dec 9, 2017 10:00 AM Speaker Series
CHM Store
Members-Only Museum Store Sale
It’s a techtastic sale and you’re invited!
The Museum store is holding its semiannual members-only sale on Saturday, December 9. CHM members receive 25% off everything in the entire store!

Look for the perfect holiday gift for the computer enthusiast in your life. Whether you want to treat yourself to a new book, scoop up a fun gadget or game for the little (or big!) kids, or you need that perfect something for a techie mom or dad . . . we’ve got you covered!
The Museum store is holding its semiannual members-only sale on Saturday, December 9. CHM members receive 25% off everything in the entire store!

Look for the perfect holiday gift for the computer enthusiast in your life. Whether you want to treat yourself to a new book, scoop up a fun gadget or game for the little (or big!) kids, or you need that perfect something for a techie mom or dad . . . we’ve got you covered!

Don’t forget to take advantage of other great membership perks during your visit:

- Treat your guests to the Museum with free admission (Members can bring an unlimited number of guests on December 9. Members' guests will also receive the 25% discount in the store)

- Experience vintage technology demonstrations

- Enjoy docent-led exhibit tours

- Get 10% off at the Cloud Café

* This event is for Museum members and their guests only. Not a Museum member? Become one today! Can’t join us on Saturday, December 9? No problem. Items can be placed on hold with a credit card number three days prior to the event. We will ring up your purchases on December 9. Purchases will be available for pick-up during our regular store hours beginning Sunday, December 10. Please contact Jim Somers, Museum Services Manager, at jsomers@computerhistory.org or 650 810 1027 with any questions.
Dec 6, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Programmed Inequality
Dr. Marie Hicks in Conversation with the Museum's Center for Software History Director David C. Brock
In her book, Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing, author and historian Dr. Marie Hicks explores how changing gender discrimination, labor demographics, and government policy led to the UK’s rise and fall as a leader in computing. She also explains how Britain’s lag in technological progress had detrimental economic effects on the UK—and why the US may be facing the same risks today.

Dr. Marie Hicks sits down with David C. Brock, Director of the Museum’s Center for Software History, to share insights from her book.
According to the National Center for Women & Information Technology, women held just 25 percent of professional computing jobs in the US in 2015. How damaging is this gender gap to the future of the tech industry?

The rise and fall of Britain’s electronic computing industry between 1944–1974 holds clues. In her book, Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing, historian Marie Hicks explores how gender discrimination, changing labor demographics, and government policy during this 30-year period shaped the UK’s path in computing. She also explains how this path had detrimental economic effects on the UK—and why the US may be facing similar risks today.

Dr. Marie Hicks sits down with David C. Brock, Director of the Museum’s Center for Software History, to share insights from her book.

Hicks received her BA from Harvard University and her MA and PhD from Duke University. Before entering academia, she worked as a UNIX systems administrator. She is currently an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her work focuses on how gender and sexuality bring hidden technological dynamics to light and how women’s experiences change the core narratives of the history of computing.


This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
The Programmed Inequality event is co-produced by the Museum's Center for Software History, which collects, preserves, interprets, and presents to the world the history of software and its ongoing impact on global society.

We are pleased to have Books Inc. onsite selling copies of Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing before and after the program.
Nov 30, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Imagineers of War
Author Sharon Weinberger in Conversation with Museum Historian John Markoff
From Agent Orange to Predator drones, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has developed some of the world’s most infamous warfare technologies. Today, the agency’s work is at the forefront of innovation in robotics and autonomous driving. How has DARPA played such a quiet—yet impactful—role in the development of both military and civilian technology?

Join us as Sharon Weinberger shares her most riveting findings about DARPA’s history and her vision for its future.
From Agent Orange to Predator drones, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has developed some of the world’s most infamous warfare technologies. However, this testing ground for solving the Pentagon’s biggest challenges has also created digital tools we rely on daily, like the internet and graphical user interfaces. Today, the agency’s work is at the forefront of innovation in robotics and autonomous driving. How has DARPA played such a quiet—yet impactful—role in the development of both military and civilian technology?

Journalist and author Sharon Weinberger’s newest book, The Imagineers of War: The Untold Story of DARPA, is a comprehensive look at the history and modern impact of DARPA. She follows the agency from its founding in response to the Sputnik launch in 1958 to its recent success in self-driving cars. Weinberger’s account is drawn from interviews with dozens of Pentagon and DARPA officials (many of whom have never been interviewed about their work before), as well as public records obtained through the Freedom of Information Act.

As a journalist and author covering the intersection of national security, science, and technology, Weinberger’s job is reporting on “War 2.0.” She is the national security editor at The Intercept and the author of Imaginary Weapons: A Journey Through the Pentagon’s Scientific Underworld. She is currently a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Weinberger has written about military science and technology for Nature, BBC, Discover, Slate, Wired, and The Washington Post, among others.

Join us as Sharon Weinberger shares her most riveting findings about DARPA’s history and her vision for its future.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.

We are pleased to have Books Inc. onsite selling copies of The Imagineers of War: The Untold Story of DARPA, before and after the program.
Nov 18, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
Make Software Family Workshop
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Nov 15, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Future of War
Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick in Conversation with the New York Times' Nicole Perlroth
How is the US government using technology to protect its citizens—and prosecute hackers? How have policy initiatives in this area changed as hacks have intensified? And what does national cybersecurity policy look like under President Donald Trump?

Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick joins us to consider these questions and more.
In 2012, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta warned that the US was at risk of a “cyber Pearl Harbor.” He pointed to rapid technological advancement in aggressor nations like China, Russia, and Iran, and cited security holes in American transportation, financial, and government systems.

Panetta’s statements came one year or more prior to state-sponsored attacks on the United States Office of Personnel Management, the State Department, Sony, the New York Times, Google, and many others. In the five years after Panetta’s dire comments, it has become clear that cyber threats are no longer just the work of teenagers in parents’ basements or even organized crime groups.

How is the US government using technology to protect its citizens—and prosecute hackers? How have policy initiatives in this area changed as hacks have intensified? How is the government working with the private sector to prevent attacks? And what does national cybersecurity policy look like under President Donald Trump?

Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick joins us to consider these questions and more. Endgame is a next-generation endpoint security software company that automates the hunt for the most advanced cyber threats. He is also an operating partner at Bessemer Venture Partners, where he works with management teams to build durable companies. Before joining Endgame, Nate was CEO of the Center for a New American Security, a national security research organization. He served as a Marine Corps infantry and reconnaissance officer, including combat tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. His book about that experience, One Bullet Away, was a New York Times bestseller, a Washington Post "Best Book of the Year," and one of the Military Times "Best Military Books of the Decade."

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Nov 12, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring West Big Data Innovation Hub's Meredith M. Lee
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Lily Cordero.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors. This program is made possible in partnership with Girl Scouts of America.
Nov 11, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Genentech's Jesper Frank Nemholt
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Lily Cordero.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Nov 10, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Yesterday's Computer of Tomorrow: The Xerox Alto
Live Alto Demonstrations by: Doug Brotz, Dan Ingalls, Tom Malloy, John Shoch, Charles Simonyi, Bob Sproull.
How did personal computing start? Many credit Apple and IBM for this radical shift, but in 1973, years before the Apple II and IBM PC, Xerox built the Alto, a computer its makers thought could become the “computer of tomorrow.” The Alto embodied for the first time many of the defining features of personal computing that seem natural now, over forty years later: individual use; interactive, graphical displays; networking; graphical interfaces with overlapping windows and icons; WYSIWYG word processing; browsers; email; and the list goes on. The birthplace of this pioneering machine was Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), which assembled a remarkable collection of computer scientists and engineers who made real their idea of “distributed personal computing.”

Join us for an evening of live demonstrations and discussions of the Alto and its remarkable software, presented by original members of the PARC team: Doug Brotz; Dan Ingalls; Tom Malloy; John Shoch, Charles Simonyi; and Bob Sproull. This will be a unique opportunity to learn about yesterday’s computer of tomorrow that profoundly shaped our world.
How did personal computing start? Many credit Apple and IBM for this radical shift, but in 1973, years before the Apple II and IBM PC, Xerox built the Alto, a computer its makers thought could become the “computer of tomorrow.” The Alto embodied for the first time many of the defining features of personal computing that seem natural now, over forty years later: individual use; interactive, graphical displays; networking; graphical interfaces with overlapping windows and icons; WYSIWYG word processing; browsers; email; and the list goes on . The birthplace of this pioneering machine was Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), which assembled a remarkable collection of computer scientists and engineers who made real their idea of “distributed personal computing.”

Original members of the PARC team will present live demonstrations of, and discuss, some of the Alto’s remarkable achievements: Tom Malloy and Charles Simonyi will present Bravo, the WYSIWYG word processor; Bob Sproull will show the graphics programs Markup and Draw; Doug Brotz will display the email client Laurel; Dan Ingalls will reveal the breakthrough programming environment and language Smalltalk; and John Shoch will survey the Alto’s other accomplishments. Our program will close with an audience Q&A session with the PARC presenters. The event will be moderated by David C. Brock, Director of the Museum’s Center for Software History. This will be a unique opportunity to learn about yesterday’s computer of tomorrow that profoundly shaped our world.

This event is co-produced by the Museum’s Center for Software History @CHM(, which collects preserves, interprets, and presents to the world the history of software and its ongoing impact on global society. The Center for Software History’s Al Kossow restored two Xerox Alto computers starting in March of 2017 as part of the center’s Alto System Project. An extensive Alto software archive has been preserved by Al Kossow and extensively curated by valued Museum volunteer Paul McJones, and it publicly available on the Museum’s website. You can learn more about the revolutionary Alto in our permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
About the Center for Software History
The purpose of the Center for Software History is to collect, preserve, and interpret the history of software and its transformational effects on global society. Software is what a computer does. The existence of code reflects the story of the people who made it. The transformational effects of software are the consequences of peoples’ creation and use of code. In the stories of these people lie the technical, business, and cultural histories of software—from timesharing services to the Cloud, from custom code to packaged programs, from developers to entrepreneurs, from smartphones to supercomputers.

The center is exploring these people-centered stories, documenting software-in-action, and leveraging the Museum’s rich collections to tell the story of software, preserve this history, and put it to work today for gauging where we are, where we have been, and where we might be going. For details, see computerhistory.org/softwarehistory.
Nov 7, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Wonder Women: Entrepreneurship, Education, and New Frontiers
In Conversation with Calico Chief Computing Officer Daphne Koller and GoldieBlox Founder Debra Sterling
Two innovative entrepreneurs share how they use technology and learning to expand the frontiers of bodies and minds. Calico Chief Computing Officer Daphne Koller and GoldieBlox Co-founder Debra Sterling join Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to discuss their work improving health and empowering girls. Join us as Koller and Sterling share their stories and offer insights into what the future holds for all of us.
It takes hard work, hard science, and hard-core commitment to change the world. But Calico Chief Computing Officer Daphne Koller and GoldieBlox CEO and Co-Founder Debra Sterling are doing it. These technologists turned entrepreneurs are creating building blocks for achieving healthier lives and empowering girls to meet their potential.

As CCO at Calico, Daphne Koller teaches computers how to learn from biological data to deliver personalized medicine. Prior to this, she co-founded Coursera, a company revolutionizing global education through universal online access. A leader in machine learning and probabilistic modeling, Koller was recognized as one of Fast Company’s Most Creative People in 2014.

Engineer Debbie Sterling is on a mission to disrupt the “pink aisle” in toy stores globally. Her award-winning children’s multimedia company, GoldieBlox, challenges gender stereotypes with the world’s first girl engineer character. She was recently added to Fortune magazine’s 40 Under 40 list.

Koller and Sterling were both named Presidential Ambassadors for Global Entrepreneurship by President Obama for their entrepreneurial leadership in education. Join us as Koller and Sterling share their stories and offer insights into what the future holds for all of us.
About the Exponential Center @CHM
This event is produced by the Exponential Center @CHM. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Oct 28, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
Spooky Software Family Workshop
Software allows computers to do many useful, groundbreaking, even spooky tasks. This Family Workshop will put a Halloween spin on many of the software applications in our Make Software: Change the World Exhibition. Participants in this workshop will also investigate ways that they too can be makers of spooky software using Raspberry Pi computers!
Software allows computers to do many useful, groundbreaking, even spooky tasks. This Family Workshop will put a Halloween spin on many of the software applications in our Make Software: Change the World Exhibition. Participants in this workshop will also investigate ways that they too can be makers of spooky software using Raspberry Pi computers!

Halloween Costumes encouraged!

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Oct 28, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
A Computer History Museum program in partnership with The Museum of Science and Industry
Special Edition
The Design_Code_Build program invites students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in a one-day event that provides engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lenses of computer science and computer history. This event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who will explore their personal and professional journey and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and interact with real tech professionals.
The Design_Code_Build program invites students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in a one-day event that provides engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lenses of computer science and computer history. This event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who will explore their personal and professional journey and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and interact with real tech professionals.

This program introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is intended for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8. This program is made in partnership with The Museum of Science and Industry
Oct 27, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Oct 20, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Oct 18, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Putting A New World In Your Hands: The Impact Of The iPhone on Our Economy and Society
Veteran technology writers Steven Levy and John Markoff in Conversation with 5 thought leaders
In the past decade iPhone and the ensuing smartphone revolution have altered our world more thoroughly than any previous computer generation. They have reached more than half the world’s population and have changed the way we communicate, travel, work, entertain ourselves and even sleep. To close the iPhone 360 event series, on October 18th veteran technology writers Steven Levy and John Markoff will host...
In the past decade, the iPhone and the ensuing smartphone revolution have altered our world more thoroughly than any previous computer generation. They have reached more than half the world’s population and have changed the way we communicate, travel, work, entertain ourselves and even sleep. To close the iPhone 360 event series, on October 18th veteran technology writers Steven Levy and John Markoff will host two panels on the impact of the iPhone.

The smartphone revolution has brought new economic freedoms— gig economy workers can now easily sell their labor to the Ubers and the Lyfts of the world without constraint. It has catalyzed a trillion dollar app economy with more than 3 billion users. At the same time, the iPhone has made it possible for a new class of monopolists such as Facebook and Google to reach the entire world’s population at virtually no cost. Levy will lead a conversation with Benedict Evans, author on how “mobile is eating the world” and Partner at venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, and Bertrand Schmitt, Co-founder and CEO of App Annie, about how the iPhone has remade the business world.

Smartphones have truly leveled the education playing field on a global scale — a young schoolchild in the most remote village of Africa can have equal access to knowledge to that of a freshman at Stanford or Harvard. Simultaneously they have enabled a global panopticon on a scale that George Orwell never dreamed of. The iPhone can literally monitor every step you take. Markoff will moderate a discussion with Cindy Cohn, executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Jean-Louis Gassée, a former Apple executive and venture capitalist, and Judy Wajcman, a sociology professor at the London School of Economics, focused on the way the iPhone has transformed our culture.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory. About iPhone 360
The iPhone 360 explores the story of iPhone, from its prehistory, inception, and launch, to its evolution and impact. Coinciding with the 10th anniversary year of the iPhone launch in 2007, iPhone 360 includes integrated initiatives across the Computer History Museum to create new collections of artifacts and oral histories, scholarly research and insights, dynamic events, and educational content and curriculum.


About the Exponential Center @CHM
This event is produced by the Exponential Center @CHM. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Oct 13, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Graphic Means: A History of Graphic Design Production
Film Screening
Please join us for this special screening of Graphic Means: A History of Graphic Design Production, hosted by Friday Nights @CHM. This documentary follows the evolution of graphic design production from the 1950s to the 1990s, from linecaster to photocomposition, and from paste-up to PDF.
It’s been roughly 30 years since the desktop computer revolutionized the way the graphic design industry works. For decades before that, it was the hands of industrious workers, and various ingenious machines and tools that brought type and image together on meticulously prepared paste-up boards, before they were sent to the printer.

Graphic Means: A History of Graphic Design Production explores graphic design production of the 1950s through the 1990s—from linecaster to photocomposition, and from paste-up to PDF. Join us for a special screening.

Watch the trailer.
Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy dinner at Off the Grid’s street food market and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits are open from 5 to 9 p.m.
Oct 10, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Understanding Computer
Google VP and Engineering Fellow Dr. Fernando Pereira in Conversation with Museum Historian John Markoff
Dr. Fernando Pereira needs you to talk to your phone. The Google VP and Engineering Fellow is relying on user interaction with products like the Pixel Phone and Google Home to conduct research that could change the way our devices understand us. His team is the brains behind Google Assistant, a software tool powered by machine learning that depends on large amounts of user data to train and improve itself. Dr. Pereira’s end goal is for computers to derive meaning from text—in other words, he wants to teach your phone how to read emails or listen to voice commands and actually understand the content. Dr. Pereira joins us to explain how he’s teaching computers to understand context in language—and his vision for a future where our devices can act upon it.
At Google’s annual developer conference in 2016, the search giant unveiled Google Assistant, an AI-powered robot that many compared to Apple’s Siri or Amazon’s Alexa. However, Google hopes that Assistant will be far more capable than making reservations and playing your favorite songs on command. Since its launch, the tool has quietly collected data from the millions of users who regularly use it. Through machine learning, the software is capable of training itself to understand the words users are saying and even how the physical world works.

What are some of the biggest challenges with teaching a machine to extract meaning from our everyday voice and text commands? How are neural networks being used to show devices the complexities and limitations of the human language? Google VP and Engineering Fellow Dr. Fernando Pereira, who currently leads projects in natural language understanding, believes the answers to these questions will allow him to further create a virtual assistant equipped with the ability to do anything you ask.

Join us for a conversation with Dr. Fernando Pereira about Google Assistant and his vision for the future of intelligent computing.

Dr. Fernando Pereira joined Google in 2008 after leaving his post as the chair of the Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania. He received a PhD in artificial intelligence from the University of Edinburgh in 1982. He has several patents and over 120 research publications on computational linguistics, machine learning, bioinformatics, speech recognition, and logic programming.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Oct 8, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build featuring RewardsPay, Inc. Founder and CEO Anu Shukla
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Lily Cordero.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Oct 8, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
Lights, Circuits, Action! Family Workshop
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Oct 7, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build featuring NASA's Dr. Wendy A. Okolo
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Lily Cordero.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Oct 6, 2017 5:00 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
Science Slam: AI & Computing Research at IBM
Series of Short Presentations from IBM Researchers
We’re teaming up with IBM Research to explore the future of computer science in the era of artificial intelligence and machine learning. Through a series of short, informal presentations, you will meet both well-established & up-and-coming IBM researchers as they share their passion for changing the world as we know it. By applying computer science to AI in new and creative ways, these scientists are changing a wide range of industries, from art to chemistry to human intelligence.
We’re teaming up with IBM Research to explore the future of computer science in the era of artificial intelligence and machine learning. Through a series of short, informal presentations, you will meet both well-established & up-and-coming IBM researchers as they share their passion for changing the world as we know it. By applying computer science to AI in new and creative ways, these scientists are changing a wide range of industries, from art to chemistry to human intelligence.

Speakers:
Jeff Welser, Vice President and Lab Director, IBM Research - Almaden “Computer Science’s Role in Silicon Valley”

Martha Sanchez, Research Staff Member, IBM Research – Almaden “Material Characterization and Device Fabrication”

Dan Gruhl, Distinguished Research Staff Member, IBM Research – Almaden “Cognitive Intelligence Augmentation Research”

Yunyao Li, Research Manager, IBM Research – Almaden “Scalable Natural Language Processing”

Raphael Arar, Designer and Researcher, IBM Research - Almaden, Forbes 30 under 30 2017 "How Art Shapes Computer and User Experiences"

Gavin Jones, Computational Chemist, IBM Research - Almaden, Foreign Policy's Global Innovator Award 2016 "Reinventing Environmental Chemistry with Cognitive Computing Tools"

Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy dinner at Off the Grid’s street food market and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits are open from 5 to 9 p.m.

Sep 30, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshop
Make Software Family Workshop
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Sep 29, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Sep 28, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
AI and Social Good
Facebook Director of AI Research Yann LeCun, Google Principal Scientist Greg Corrado & Microsoft Technical Fellow Eric Horvitz
AI is often mentioned as a driver of high-tech products and services. However, engineers and technology experts competing for the hearts and minds of consumers are not the only ones interested in the potential of artificial intelligence. AI scientists are joining with experts and practitioners in education, medicine, public health, sustainability, housing, and other fields to address long-standing societal challenges. In collaboration with the Partnership on Artificial Intelligence, CHM Live presents a conversation with Facebook Director of AI Research Yann LeCun, Google Principal Scientist Greg Corrado, and Microsoft Technical Fellow and Director of Microsoft Research Labs Eric Horvitz.
We often hear about the promise of AI for creating new kinds of products and services. Less known are efforts to harness AI for societal good. AI scientists are joining with experts and practitioners in education, medicine, public health, sustainability, housing, and other fields to address long-standing social and societal challenges. We will focus on answers to this question, surveying current efforts and reflecting about the longer-term promise of AI for social good.

In collaboration with the Partnership on Artificial Intelligence, CHM Live presents a conversation with Facebook Director of AI Research Yann LeCun, Google Principal Scientist Greg Corrado, and Director of Microsoft Research Labs Eric Horvitz.

This event is the second in a two-part series focusing on the impact and implications of artificial intelligence for our society.

This will be streamed live on our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/computerhistory.
Sep 24, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Lily Cordero.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Sep 23, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Lily Cordero.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Sep 22, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Sep 15, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Sep 13, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Our Relationship with AI
Siri Co-founder Tom Gruber, AAAI President Subbarao Kambhampati & IBM Distinguished Research Scientist Francesca Rossi
Artificial Intelligence could improve our ability to communicate, problem-solve, and understand the world around us. How do designers, engineers, and technologists build systems that help us work with machines? As part of a series produced in collaboration with the Partnership on Artificial Intelligence, please join us for a conversation with Apple’s Tom Gruber, AAAI President Subbarao Kambhampati, and IBM Distinguished Research Scientist Francesca Rossi.
When considering artificial intelligence, you may think of what it can do for machines. However, a primary goal of building AI tools is augmenting the perception, cognition, and problem-solving abilities of people. From a physician using machine learning to diagnose disease to cars that can protect drivers from accidents, positive collaboration between human and machine is what gives artificial intelligence its potential.

So how are technologists, engineers, and organizations designing AI tools that enable people and devices to understand and work with each other? In collaboration with the Partnership on Artificial Intelligence, CHM Live presents a conversation with Apple’s Tom Gruber, AAAI President Subbarao Kambhampati, and IBM Distinguished Research Scientist Francesca Rossi.

This will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory. This event is the first in a two-part series focusing on the influences and implications of artificial intelligence for our society.
Sep 8, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
The Silicon Valley Science Fiction Short Film Festival
Screening of 16 Short Films from Around the World
Please join us for a screening of 16 of the world’s best science fiction short films. For the fifth time, the Silicon Valley Science Fiction Short Film Festival has assembled a two-hour block of enchanting, engrossing, and occasionally enraging cinema. Award-winning filmmakers, including Oscar, Emmy, and Annie nominees, present works that look at what it means to create art, to live in an unfair world, to deal with the big problems, and ultimately, to be human.
For the fifth time, the Silicon Valley Science Fiction Short Film Festival has gathered short films from around the world to screen in a two-hour block of enchanting, engrossing, and occasionally enraging cinema. The lineup includes incredible narrative films from the U.S., U.K., Australia, and France, alongside animations from Iran, South Korea, The Netherlands, Austria, and Canada. Award-winning filmmakers, including Oscar, Emmy, and Annie nominees, present works that look at what it means to create art, to live in an unfair world, to deal with the big problems, and ultimately, to be human. These shorts feature famous actors of television and film, newcomers you'll be hearing from.,and experimental works that will thrill all viewers!

Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy dinner at Off the Grid’s street food market and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits are open from 5 to 9 p.m. As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.
Sep 1, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Aug 26, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Make Software Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Aug 25, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Aug 24, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Technology, Health & Equality
California Endowment SVP Dr. Anthony Iton in Conversation with P2Health Ventures Co-founder Vanessa Mason
In an age of sophisticated healthcare technologies and research tools, the doctors you see or hospitals you visit are only a small part of what determines your health. Through extensive research and data analysis, one doctor has discovered that your zip code may matter more to your well-being than your genetic code.

Join us for a conversation about how data helped Dr. Anthony Iton identify this problem—and the role technology can play in solving it.
In an age of sophisticated healthcare technologies and research tools, the doctors you see or hospitals you visit are only a small part of what determines your health. Through extensive research and data analysis, one doctor has discovered that your zip code may matter more to your well-being than your genetic code.

Dr. Anthony Iton first witnessed the link between health and socio-economic status as a Johns Hopkins medical student working in East Baltimore at the height of the crack and AIDS epidemics. This connection became more clear in his role as the director of the Public Health Department for Alameda County. As the person responsible for signing the county’s thousands of death certificates, Dr. Iton started to notice patterns in the ages, causes of death, ethnicities, and zip codes of the deceased. Since then, he has dedicated his career to researching these correlations across the country. Today, Dr. Iton is focused on improving health conditions in 14 low-income communities throughout California as the senior vice president of the California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities initiative.

Join us for a conversation about how data helped Dr. Iton identify this problem—and the role technology can play in solving it.

Prior to his appointment at The California Endowment and his position at the Alameda County Public Health Department, Iton also served for three years as director of Health and Human Services and School Medical Advisor for the City of Stamford, Connecticut. Concurrent to that, he also served as a physician in internal medicine for Stamford Hospital's HIV Clinic. Additionally, Iton served for five years as a primary care physician for the San Francisco Department of Public Health.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Aug 18, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Aug 11, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Aug 8, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Thinking Inside the Square
Square CEO Jack Dorsey in Conversation with The Verge's Senior Technology Editor Lauren Goode
Thinking Inside the Square
Square started in 2009 with a tiny, white card reader you could plug into your phone to accept payments from anyone, but hasn’t stopped there. After a $3.4 billion IPO in 2015, the company is now a cohesive commerce ecosystem that helps sellers start, run, and grow businesses. Square CEO Jack Dorsey shares why and how he started the company, his approach to innovation in financial services, and his vision for the future of commerce.
Square believes the economy is better when everyone has access. It’s empowering the electrician to send invoices, setting up the food truck with delivery, helping the boutique pay employees, and giving the coffee chain capital for a fourth location.

Square started in 2009 with a tiny, white card reader you could plug into your phone to accept credit card payments instantly. After a $3.4 billion IPO in 2015, the company is now a cohesive commerce ecosystem that helps sellers start, run, and grow their businesses. As Square grows, how could the company change the way we sell and buy things?

Square CEO Jack Dorsey shares why and how he started the digital payments company, his approach to innovation in financial services, and his vision for the future of commerce.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Aug 5, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Educators' Edition
Special Edition
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
This special event welcomes classroom and community educators to a fun-filled day exploring cross-curricular applications of computer programming concepts.

Throughout the day, educators will be introduced to Raspberry Pi technology, learn about CHM’s educational resources, and discover meaningful strategies for incorporating computer science and computer history into a wide variety of learning environments. Participants will network and share ideas with classroom, community, and museum educators while exploring new concepts to take back to their students and communities.

The Design_Code_Build program is a one-day event that provides engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire interest and curiosity.

Please note that this event is for classroom and community educators interested in learning and doing more with technology. No prior computer programming experience is required.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable fee per individual participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Aug 4, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Vintage Game Night
Experience Some of the World’s Earliest Video Games
In partnership with The MADE and The Vintage Computer Festival, Friday Nights @CHM is hosting a vintage game night! Get the chance to play classic video games on an Amiga 4000, an Apple IIGS, a PDP-1, and our Galaxy Game console. If you can’t make it, watch us play Spacewar, the first known video game ever, on Twitch starting at 5 p.m.


Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
In partnership with The MADE and The Vintage Computer Festival, Friday Nights @CHM is hosting a vintage game night! Get the chance to play classic video games on an Amiga 4000, an Apple IIGS, a PDP-1, and our Galaxy Game console.

If you can’t make it, experience Spacewar, the first known video game ever on Twitch starting at 5 p.m.

You can enjoy Off the Grid’s street food market and drinks from our Cloud Bistro throughout the evening. Museum exhibits are open from 5 to 9 p.m.
On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jul 29, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Lights, Circuits, Action!
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jul 28, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
VENTURE: An Entrepreneur’s Journey
Film Screening and Panel Discussion on African Entrepreneurship
Please join us for this special screening of VENTURE: An Entrepreneur’s Journey, hosted by Friday Nights @CHM, in collaboration with the African Technology Foundation and the LIONS@FRICA initiative. The film highlights the stories of four African technology entrepreneurs as they work to build their businesses.The screening will be followed by a panel discussion and Q&A on African entrepreneurship, Silicon Valley and globalization.
VENTURE: An Entrepreneur’s Journey is a documentary film co-produced by the African Technology Foundation and the LIONS@FRICA initiative. The film follows the journeys of the entrepreneurs behind Zuuva, BambaPOS, InsureAfrika, and Car Parts Nigeria. These companies are the 2015 winners of DEMO Africa, a pan-African pitch competition that aims to connect African startups to the global ecosystem. Through this program, startup leaders are given a platform to launch their products to a global audience of investors and ecosystem stakeholders.

From the African continent to Silicon Valley, the film highlights each entrepreneur’s unique experience as they work to build their business and progress through the competition.

After the screening, there will be a panel discussion and Q&A on African entrepreneurship and globalization featuring mentors and advisors who met with the LIONS during their time in Silicon Valley.

Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy dinner at Off the Grid’s street food market and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits are open from 5 to 9 p.m
Jul 21, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jul 18, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Building Ships, Companies, and the Cloud
Google Cloud Senior Vice President Diane Greene in Conversation with the Exponential Center's Marguerite Gong Hancock
Building Ships, Companies, and the Cloud
Diane Greene has designed ships, run engineering teams, and co-founded software virtualization giant VMware. Now she leads Google's cloud business and sits on the boards of Alphabet, Intuit, and MIT. Join us as Greene sits down with Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to discuss her evolution from engineer to entrepreneur, how Silicon Valley has changed throughout her career, and what lies ahead for Google's cloud business.
Whether as an engineer or an entrepreneur, Diane Greene’s career can be best described as “storied.” She has designed naval ships, run engineering teams, and co-founded multiple startups. Now she leads Google’s cloud business and sits on the boards of Alphabet, Intuit, and MIT. How did she evolve from engineer to serial entrepreneur to global executive?

After receiving degrees in mechanical engineering, naval architecture, and computer science from University of Vermont, MIT, and UC Berkeley, respectively, Greene held engineering and management positions for SGI, Tandem, and Sybase. In 1998 she co-founded and served as CEO of virtualization giant VMware. Over the course of 10 years, she took the company public and to a $2 billion run rate. In 2016 Dell Technologies acquired VMware as part of its $67 billion merger with EMC, the largest technology deal in history.

In her role as SVP of Google Cloud, Greene oversees the growth and strategy of a major business partnering with customers like Snapchat, Disney, and eBay. She took on this role in 2015, after Bebop, the cloud developer platform she co-founded, was acquired by Google for $383 million. As the search giant enters a sector dominated by Amazon, Microsoft, and IBM, she has set the ambitious goal to lead the cloud computing market by 2022.

Join us as Diane Greene sits down with Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to share her story, discuss how Silicon Valley has changed throughout her career, and talk about what lies ahead for Google’s Cloud business.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
About the Exponential Center
This event is co-produced by CHM's Exponential Center. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Jul 15, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Make Software Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jul 14, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new!
Jul 11, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Why Software Matters to Government Intelligence
IARPA Director Jason Matheny in Conversation with the Museum's Center for Software History Director David C. Brock
The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), also known as “DARPA for spies,” is the science and technology research arm for the intelligence community. On behalf of the 17 organizations that comprise this community, IARPA invests in “high risk/high payoff” programs to tackle the biggest challenges in intelligence gathering and analysis.

IARPA Director Dr. Jason Matheny joins us to discuss some of the organization’s most exciting research projects, explains how IARPA approaches research investment, and tells us why software matters to the intelligence community.
The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), also known as “DARPA for spies,” is the science and technology research arm for the intelligence community in the Office of the Director for National Intelligence. On behalf of the 17 military and civilian agencies and organizations that comprise this community, IARPA invests in “high risk/high payoff” programs to tackle the biggest challenges in intelligence gathering and analysis. IARPA programs range from quantum computing and autonomous vehicles, to bioinformatics and neuroscience to machine detection of emerging technology. IARPA also sponsors prize challenges as a way to spur new ideas and projects.

IARPA Director Dr. Jason Matheny joins us to discuss some of the organization’s most exciting research projects, explains how IARPA approaches research investment, and tells us why software matters to the intelligence community.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
This event is co-produced by the Museum's Center for Software History, which collects, preserves, interprets, and presents to the world the history of software and its ongoing impact on global society.
Jul 7, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming for visitors of all ages, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jun 30, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits. On select Fridays, we'll be bringing you interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jun 23, 2017 6:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Easy to Learn, Hard to Master
Film Screening and Q&A with Filmmaker Bruno Grampa and Narrator Bil Herd
<i>Easy to Learn, Hard to Master</i>
Please join us for this special screening of Easy to Learn, Hard to Master, hosted by Friday Nights @CHM. The film follows the story of Atari and the dynamic team that charted the company’s course. After the screening, Executive Producer Bruno Grampa and Narrator Bil Herd will be available to take questions from the audience.
Atari has an impressive collection of “firsts”: it is responsible for producing the first coin-operated videogame, the first general-purpose console to win the market, and one of the first marriages between the videogame and movie industries. It was also the fastest-growing company in US history at its peak and contributed to a crash that reshaped the video game industry. Easy to Learn, Hard to Master follows the story of Atari and the dynamic team that charted the company’s course. Produced by The 8bit Generation Project, the film features interviews with Nolan Bushnell, Allan Alcorn, Warner VP Manny Gerard, and Former Atari CEO Ray Kassar.

The 8bit Generation Project is dedicated to research, collection, and presentation of history from the era of the 8-bit microprocessor, popular in machines from the early 1970s to the end of the 1980s.

Executive Producer Bruno Grampa and Narrator Bil Herd will join Museum CEO John Hollar for audience Q&A. Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy dinner at Off the Grid's street food market and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits are open from 5 to 9 p.m.
Jun 21, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Decoding Cancer
Cancer Genome Atlas Director Dr. Jean Claude Zenklusen in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Decoding Cancer
Not all cancers are created equal—sequences in a cancer cell’s genetic code can affect how quickly it spreads, how resistant it is to radiation, and how it turns a normal cell into a cancerous one. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) is focused on identifying, analyzing, and sharing these genetic traits. Ultimately, this information could help the medical community provide personalized treatments and more accurate diagnoses for patients.

Join us as TCGA Director Dr. Jean Claude Zenklusen discusses the role of genetics and technology in studying, treating, and preventing cancer.
Not all cancers are created equal—sequences in a cancer cell’s genetic code can affect how quickly it spreads, how resistant it is to radiation, and how it turns a normal cell into a cancerous one. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), a collaboration between the National Cancer Institute and the National Human Genome Research Institute, is focused on identifying, analyzing, and sharing these genetic traits. Ultimately, this information could help the medical community provide personalized treatments and more accurate diagnoses for patients.

As the largest-scale cancer genomics project to date, TCGA researchers have mapped key genomic changes in 33 different types of cancer, including 10 rare forms of the disease. The organization has also collected 2.5 petabytes of data describing tumor and normal tissues from more than 11,000 patients. This information is publicly available and has been used by thousands of researchers.

Join us as TCGA Director Dr. Jean Claude Zenklusen discusses the role of genetics and technology in studying, treating and preventing cancer.

Dr. Zenklusen was named director of TCGA in 2013. Prior to that, he served as the scientific program director of the Office of Cancer Genomics. He also cloned two novel tumor suppressor genes while participating in the Human Genome Project in 1996. He received his PhD in cancer biology and genetics from the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences in 1995.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Jun 20, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Putting Your Finger On It: Creating the iPhone
An Evening with Original iPhone Innovators & Engineers in Conversation with Museum Historian John Markoff
Putting Your Finger On It: Creating the iPhone
How did iPhone come to be? On June 20, four members of the original development team will discuss the secret Apple project, which in the past decade has remade the computer industry, changed the business landscape, and become a tool in the hands of more than a billion people around the world.

Scott Forstall, the leader of the original iPhone software team will take part in a fireside chat with Computer History Museum historian John Markoff. A panel with three of the engineers who worked on the original iPhone, Nitin Ganatra, Scott Herz, and Hugo Fiennes, will describe how the iPhone came to be.
During 2006, the year before the iPhone was introduced, it seemed that innovation in mobile devices was beginning to slip away from Silicon Valley. Wireless computing was advancing more quickly in Europe than it was in the United States. That all changed abruptly when Steve Jobs stepped onstage at Moscone Center in San Francisco and asserted he was introducing “three revolutionary products” in one package—the iPhone.

How did iPhone come to be? On June 20, four members of the original development team will discuss the secret Apple project, which in the past decade has remade the computer industry, changed the business landscape, and become a tool in the hands of more than a billion people around the world.

Part 1: Original iPhone Engineers Nitin Ganatra, Scott Herz, and Hugo Fiennes in Conversation with John Markoff

Part 2: Original iPhone Software Team Leader Scott Forstall in Conversation with John Markoff About iPhone 360
The iPhone 360 explores the story of iPhone, from its prehistory, inception, and launch, to its evolution and impact. Coinciding with the 10th anniversary year of the iPhone launch in 2007, iPhone 360 includes integrated initiatives across the Computer History Museum to create new collections of artifacts and oral histories, scholarly research and insights, dynamic events, and educational content and curriculum.

About the Exponential Center
This event is produced by CHM's Exponential Center. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Jun 17, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build - Father's Day Edition
Special Edition
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
This special event welcomes middle school students and their fathers to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. Students and their dads will learn with and from each other as they take on new challenges and gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators. This event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Please note that this event is for fathers and their students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 16, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits. On select Fridays, we'll be bringing you interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jun 15, 2017 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Photoshop Magic
A Lecture by Digital Artist & Author Bert Monroy
Photoshop Magic
Digital art pioneer and Photoshop Hall of Famer Bert Monroy will share how he came to see a computer as a tool for art. Hear him describe the digital paint techniques he has mastered throughout his career and highlight the famous faces in his largest piece to date Times Square, currently on display in our Make Software: Change the World! exhibition.
Digital artist Bert Monroy uses Adobe Illustrator as his pencil and Photoshop as his paint to create digital works of art. After 30 years as a commercial illustrator, he has mastered the technique of hyperrealism in his digital illustrations by perfecting reflections and shadows down to the very last pixel. Times Square, Monroy’s largest and most ambitious painting to date, contains more than 700,000 Photoshop layers and took four years to create.The masterpiece also contains hidden “Easter eggs” featuring famous faces and Monroy’s friends and family.

Monroy’s interest in computing was sparked by the Macintosh 128 in 1984. From early drawing programs such as MacPaint, Display (the first version of Photoshop), and Illustrator 1.1 to the current versions of Photoshop and Illustrator, he has utilized photo-imaging software throughout his career to transform his works into digital masterpieces, earning him a spot in the Photoshop Hall of Fame. Monroy has written and co-authored several books, including the first-ever book on Photoshop titled The Official Adobe Photoshop Handbook. Today, Monroy’s clients include Apple, Adobe, Pixar, and Disney Animation. He also teaches popular Photoshop courses Pixel Playground and Dreamscapes on Lynda.com and has a vast library of digital-painting tutorials.

Join us as Bert Monroy shares his story and perspective on the evolution of Photoshop as well as the digital techniques and tricks he uses to create art.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Jun 10, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Mechanical Engineer Camille Eddy
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 10, 2017 10:00 AM Education Series
Education Workshops
Design_Code_Build Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jun 9, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits. On select Fridays, we'll be bringing you interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jun 8, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Engineering Emotional Intelligence
Affectiva CEO Rana el Kaliouby in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
What could your computer or phone do if it knew how you were feeling? Through a combination of psychology, technology, and cognitive science, one startup is bringing emotional intelligence to the digital world. Affectiva has developed new artificial intelligence that allows machines to not only read your feelings, but also react to them.

Join us as Dr. Rana el Kaliouby, Affectiva CEO and co-founder, shares how the company’s technology was invented, the creative ways the software is being used, and her vision for the future of emotion-aware computing.
What could your computer or phone do if it knew how you were feeling? Through a combination of psychology, technology, and cognitive science, one startup is bringing emotional intelligence to the digital world. Affectiva has developed new artificial intelligence that allows machines to not only read your feelings, but also react to them. Spun out of the MIT Media Lab, the company has developed sophisticated face and emotion algorithms that can detect even the most nuanced expressions with a high degree of accuracy. This technology is trained and tested by incorporating information from Affectiva’s emotional data repository of 4.8 million faces from 75 different countries, amounting to more than 50 billion emotion data points.

Affectiva’s software is already in the hands of developers, content creators, market researchers, and advertisers, who are using it to learn more about how audiences react to products. Companies like Unilever, CBS, Kellogg, and Mars are current customers.

Join us as Dr. Rana el Kaliouby, Affectiva CEO and co-founder, shares how the company’s technology was invented, the creative ways the software is being used, and her vision for the future of emotion-aware computing. Prior to starting the company, Rana worked as a scientist at MIT, leading efforts to apply emotion-sensing technology to mental health and autism research. Rana is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. Rana holds a BSc and MSc in computer science from the American University in Cairo and a PhD from the computer laboratory at the University of Cambridge.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Jun 4, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins directly, crobbins@computerhistory.org.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 3, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 2, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits. On select Fridays, we'll be bringing you interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jun 1, 2017 8:15 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Forum on the Road
KQED Broadcasts Live from the Computer History Museum
Forum on the Road is back for a second series of live broadcasts across the Bay Area. During Forum's two-hour program at the Computer History Museum, KQED host Michael Krasny will discuss technology and issues facing Silicon Valley.
Forum on the Road is back for a second series of live broadcasts across the Bay Area. During Forum's two-hour program at the Computer History Museum, host Michael Krasny will discuss technology and issues facing Silicon Valley. Audience members will participate in these live programs and get a behind-the-scenes look at how the show is produced.

Krasny will spend one hour focusing on the spread of fake news with Google News founder Krishna Bharat and other guests. The next hour will be dedicated to discussing augmented reality and it's applications in Silicon Valley.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
May 19, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Big Data Gets Political
Stanford University’s Dr. Michal Kosinski in Conversation with Museum's Center for Software History David C. Brock
Big Data Gets Political
Liking your favorite musicians, restaurants, and travel destinations on Facebook may seem harmless. But each click may have played a crucial role in Donald Trump’s victory and the UK’s vote to leave the European Union.

Join us as Stanford University’s Dr. Michal Kosinski discusses how big data is being used in politics and what it could mean for the future of voting.
Liking your favorite musicians, restaurants, and travel destinations on Facebook may seem harmless. But each click may have played a crucial role in Donald Trump’s victory and the UK’s vote to leave the European Union.

Dr. Michal Kosinski turned studying Facebook likes into a science at Cambridge University’s Psychometrics Center. He and a fellow student developed a personality quiz application that encouraged users to opt into sharing their Facebook profiles. This allowed Kosinski to create a database that linked users’ Facebook likes with the personality traits they revealed by taking the quiz. In addition to discovering correlations between personality and the things users liked on Facebook, he was able to predict a user’s skin color, sexual orientation, political leanings, and even alcohol and drug use.

It didn’t take long before Kosinski’s work attracted the attention of the private sector—specifically, a big data firm that gave rise to Cambridge Analytica, the analytics company that worked with the Trump and LeaveEU campaigns. Kosinski, who had become increasingly uneasy as he started to consider the implications of his research, turned down the company’s offer to pay for access to his database. He soon learned that the company had created a copy of his data tool and was using it in the wild.

Dr. Michal Kosinski joins us to share his story—his work in psychometrics, how his big data tool works, the methods he warned against and finally, his vision for the future of data in politics and beyond.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy dinner at one of Off the Grid food trucks and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits will also be open from 5-8pm.
May 13, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Make Software Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
May 7, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build—Mother's Day Edition Featuring Broadcom's Melissa Lau
Special Edition
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
This special event welcomes middle school students and their mothers to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. Students and their moms will learn with and from each other as they take on new challenges and gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators. This event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Please note that this event is for mothers and their students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
May 4, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
From Screen Queen to Imaging Innovator
Openwater CEO Mary Lou Jepsen in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Mary Lou Jepsen has led Facebook’s virtual reality efforts, advised Google’s Sergey Brin, and invented $100 laptops. Now she is turning her consumer electronics experience to the task of curing disease. Jepsen's goal with her new company Openwater is to shrink today’s massive MRI machines into wearable devices that continuously scan the body.
Mary Lou Jepsen has led Facebook’s virtual reality efforts, advised Google’s Sergey Brin, and invented $100 laptops. Now she is turning her consumer electronics experience to the task of curing disease.

After decades of working in display divisions at some of Silicon Valley’s biggest companies, her goal is to shrink today’s massive MRI machines into wearable devices that continuously scan the body. Jepsen’s new company, Openwater, is developing technology that uses the way the body scatters infrared light to develop high-resolution images equal to those produced by an MRI. This is enabled by novel LCDs with pixels small enough to create holographic images, coupled with the use of body-temperature detectors and complex software. These LCDs are small and light enough that they could line a beanie or a bandage. The implications of a wearable body imaging system are significant for detecting and treating cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and even mental illnesses.

Join us as Mary Lou Jepsen discusses her Silicon Valley history, her company on the cutting edge of tech and medicine, and her vision for the future of body imaging and healthcare. Until mid-2016 she led advanced consumer electronics and virtual reality at Facebook and Oculus. Previously, she had a similar role at Google and Google X, where she was also a close advisor to Sergey Brin. She co-founded One Laptop per Child (OLPC) with Nicholas Negroponte, and was the lead inventor and architect of the $100 laptop. She holds a PhD in optical physics and an ScB in electrical engineering both from Brown University as well as an ScM in computational holography from the MIT Media Lab. She is an inventor on over 100 published or issued patents.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Apr 29, 2017 12:00 PM Education Event
Education Workshops
Cracking the Code Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Humans have been using code to share information for centuries. In this workshop, participants will discover different ways people have communicated over time, from Incan Quipu to Morse Code, uncover the motivations behind code writing, and explore how computers read and interpret code today.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is being held as a special event and is not open to the pubic.
Apr 23, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Apr 19, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Venture Capital in the Blood
Three Generations of Drapers in Silicon Valley
Join us with Draper Richard Kaplan Co-chair Bill Draper, DFJ and Draper Associates Founding Partner Tim Draper, and Halogen Ventures Founding Partner Jesse Draper in Conversation with Exponential Center’s Marguerite Gong Hancock.
The Draper family has played a defining role in Silicon Valley venture capital for four generations, spanning 60 years. Guiding entrepreneurs from idea to exit, Drapers have served as investors, mentors, match-makers, and allies to founders of Hotmail, Skype, Baidu, Apollo Computer, Tesla and more.

The Draper VC dynasty began in 1958. General William Draper founded Draper, Gaither & Anderson, one of the first professional venture capital firms on the west coast. His son Bill co-founded Draper & Johnson then Sutter Hill Ventures, before starting Draper International, a fund focused on venture investments in India, and Draper Richards, which invests in U.S. technology companies. Bill's son, Tim, cofounded Draper Fisher Jurvetson (DFJ) in 1985. DFJ has backed tech superstars like Baidu, Space X and Tumblr.. Tim’s daughter Jesse, also known as “The Valley Girl”, continues the Draper legacy today as the founder of Halogen Ventures, an early stage VC fund focused on female-founded consumer companies.

How did the Drapers catch--and pass on--the venture capital bug? What lessons have these investors learned from each other? What does the future of VC look like in Silicon Valley and around the world? Join us for stories and insights from three generations of Drapers.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Apr 8, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 26, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build - Mentors' Edition
Special Edition
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
This special event welcomes middle school students and their adult mentors to participate together. Students will work alongside their mentors to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. Students and their adult mentors will learn with and from each other as they take on new challenges and gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators. This event is suitable for participants who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8 and their adult mentors.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors. Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Mar 25, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Design_Code_Build Family Workshop
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Mar 24, 2017 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
I’m Sorry, Dave. I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That.
A Lecture by IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center's Grady Booch
IBM Fellow Grady Booch will explore how we take our dreams of computing machines that do the impossible and turn them into the possible, with a consideration for the limits we must overcome, from the laws of physics to the principles of design to the constraints of our very human ethical and moral frameworks.
“The limits of the possible,” said Arthur C. Clarke, “can only be defined by going beyond them into the impossible.” Our mythologies, our books, our movies have given voice to our dreams of computers that transcend human abilities; we do not lack for imagination of the impossible. In a sense, the history of computing can be seen through the lens of how our science and our engineering have yielded a continuous process of making the impossible possible. However, there are things we know we cannot do, there are some things we don’t yet know how to do, and there are some things we probably shouldn’t do.

This presentation is the next lecture in the documentary project Computing: The Human Experience. Here, we will explore how we take our dreams of computing machines that do the impossible and turn them into the possible, with a consideration for the limits we must overcome, from the laws of physics to the principles of design to the constraints of our very human ethical and moral frameworks.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Mar 12, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build - All Girls Edition
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this all girls event is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 9, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Hunting for Space Treasure
Planetary Resources CEO Chris Lewicki in Conversation with John Hollar
Planetary Resources is developing technology that could enable humans to fly spacecraft to asteroids and mine minerals that could be worth millions of dollars. The company is backed by luminaries like Larry Page and Richard Branson and raised $21 million in May 2016.

Join us as CEO Chris Lewicki sits down with Museum CEO John Hollar.
Forget Silicon Valley: could outer space be the next place to make your fortune?

Planetary Resources is developing technology that could enable humans to fly spacecraft to asteroids and mine minerals that could be worth millions of dollars. The company is backed by luminaries like Larry Page and Richard Branson and raised $21 million in May.

As part of the technology, the company is working on to reach asteroids, it created an earth observation system called Ceres. This platform’s infrared and hyperspectral sensors far surpass the capability of human eyes. Through this technology, Ceres could enable more sophisticated tracking of climate change, crop growth, forest fires and many other environmental changes.

Chris Lewicki has been intimately involved with the lifecycle of NASA’s Mars Exploration Rovers and the Phoenix Mars Lander. He performed system engineering development and participated in assembly, test and launch operations for both Mars missions. He was Flight Director for the rovers Spirit and Opportunity, and the Surface Mission Manager for Phoenix. The recipient of two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals, Lewicki has an asteroid named in his honor: 13609 Lewicki. Chris holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Arizona.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Mar 5, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build - All Girls Edition
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this all girls event is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 2, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Computing in Your Pocket
The Prehistory of the iPhone in Silicon Valley
Join us for a fascinating panel discussion with moderator John Markoff, a Computer History Museum Historian, who reported on the era for the New York Times, Steve Capps, who led the development of the Newton while at Apple Computer; Donna Dubinsky, former president & CEO of Palm, Inc. and co-founder & former CEO of Handspring; Jerry Kaplan, founder of Go Corp.; and Marc Porat, co-founder and former chief executive of General Magic.
Two decades before Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone, a handful of engineers and designers began exploring the idea of handheld computers in Silicon Valley. In 1987, beginning with the then-secret Newton Project inside Apple and with a mobile pen-based computer at Go Corp., a range of handheld computing ideas began to bubble up all around the Valley. Before long, inside Apple there were prototypes like Swatch and Pen Mac, and the Pocket Crystal idea which would be spun out in 1990 as General Magic. Shortly afterwards, in 1992, Palm Computing was founded. The race was on to reinvent computing and make it even more personal.

Join us for a fascinating panel discussion with moderator John Markoff, a Computer History Museum Historian, who reported on the era for the New York Times, Steve Capps, who led the development of the Newton while at Apple Computer; Donna Dubinsky, former president & CEO of Palm, Inc. and co-founder & former CEO of Handspring; Jerry Kaplan, founder of Go Corp.; and Marc Porat, co-founder and former chief executive of General Magic.


This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory. This event is produced by CHM's Exponential Center. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Feb 26, 2017 12:00 PM Education Event
Education Workshops
Cracking the Code Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Humans have been using code to share information for centuries. In this workshop, participants will discover different ways people have communicated over time, from Incan Quipu to Morse Code, uncover the motivations behind code writing, and explore how computers read and interpret code today.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Feb 25, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Feb 17, 2017 Special Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Computer History Trivia Night!
Where can you have fun, play games, and grab amazing food on a Friday night? CHM! Friday Nights @CHM is hosting a computer history trivia night!

Bring your friends, family, co workers, or just bring yourself, and join us on Friday, February 17 for a trivia night all about computer history! The fun begins at 6 p.m., but come earlier and explore our exhibits to get a head start on the competition.
Where can you have fun, play games, and grab amazing food on a Friday night? CHM! Friday Nights @CHM is hosting a computer history trivia night!

Bring your friends, family, co workers, or just bring yourself, and join us on Friday, February 17 for a trivia night all about computer history! The fun begins at 6 p.m., but come earlier and explore our exhibits to get a head start on the competition. Museum hours are extended to 8 p.m. on Fridays. The Cloud Bistro will be open as well with snacks and drinks!

Join us for a fun evening of trivia and show off your computer history knowledge!
Feb 16, 2017 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Six Transformations of Hewlett-Packard
A Conversation with Becoming Hewlett Packard Authors Webb McKinney and Philip E. Meza
The Six Transformations of Hewlett-Packard
In startup history, Hewlett-Packard is the “granddaddy of them all." Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard developed business and management practices we see reflected in Silicon Valley companies today. However, after 77 years of history and seven CEOs, the HP of today looks completely different from the company it was in 1939. How has leadership at Hewlett-Packard enabled the company to transform itself throughout its history? And what can today’s founders learn from the company’s ability to evolve?
In startup history, Hewlett-Packard is the “granddaddy of them all”. Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard developed business and management practices we see reflected in Silicon Valley companies today. However, after 77 years of history and seven CEOs, the HP of today looks completely different from the company it was in 1939. How has leadership at Hewlett-Packard enabled the company to transform itself throughout its history? And what can today’s founders learn from the company’s ability to evolve?

Becoming Hewlett Packard: Why Strategic Leadership Matters tackles these questions by studying the contributions of each of HP’s CEOs, obtained through 15 years of primary research. Former HP executive Webb McKinney and strategy consultant Philip E. Meza join Museum Center for Software History Director, David Brock for a conversation about the role of leadership in shaping HP and what startups can learn from its history.

Webb McKinney began his career at HP when David Packard and Bill Hewlett ran the company. McKinney held numerous engineering management and executive positions at HP, running HP's entry into consumer PCs, and going on to lead its entire PC business. McKinney later led worldwide sales, marketing and supply chains for all of HP's commercial customers. Before retiring from HP in 2003, McKinney was the executive vice president responsible for HP's integration of Compaq. McKinney is currently a consultant in merger integration and leadership development.

Philip E. Meza is a strategy consultant and researcher. Much of his consulting work focuses on technology strategy and business development. A graduate of the University of California at Berkeley and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, Meza is the author of Coming Attractions: Hollywood, High Tech and the Future of Entertainment (2007) and co-author of Strategic Dynamics: Concepts and Cases (2006).

We are pleased to announce Books Inc. will be selling copies of Becoming Hewlett Packard: Why Strategic Leadership Matters before and after the program.
Feb 12, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Make Software Family Workshop
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jan 28, 2017 10:00 AM Speaker Series
New Exhibition
Make Software: Change the World! Public Opening
We’re celebrating software with the opening of our new major exhibition, Make Software: Change the World!
Computers help us design safer cars, diagnose disease, and battle Orcs. They manage our business by day and entertain us at night. Smartphones can hail a cab, send a text, or play a tune. All thanks to software. Software enables computers, tablets, even appliances to touch and transform nearly every aspect of daily life. Our devices brim with extraordinary potential. Software unlocks that potential.

We’re celebrating software with the opening of our new major exhibition, Make Software: Change the World!

Make Software explores the history, impact, and technology behind seven software applications that have transformed our lives, including MRI, MP3, Car Crash Simulation, Texting, Wikipedia, Photoshop, and World of Warcraft. It presents new ways of thinking about software, uncovering its storied past and its current impact all the while encouraging viewers to imagine a world where almost anything is possible because of software. Make Software comprises 6,000 square feet of interactive exhibition space, anchored by a software lab that enables visitors of all ages to understand software and the concepts of programming through multimedia interactive stations.

Click here for more information about Make Software: Change the World!
Jan 27, 2017 10:00 AM Speaker Series
New Exhibition
Make Software: Change the World! Members-Only Exhibition Preview and Reception
CHM members are invited to join us for an exclusive preview of the Museum's new major exhibition, Make Software: Change the World!
Computers help us design safer cars, diagnose disease, and battle Orcs. They manage our business by day and entertain us at night. Smartphones can hail a cab, send a text, or play a tune. All thanks to software. Software enables computers, tablets, even appliances to touch and transform nearly every aspect of daily life. Our devices brim with extraordinary potential. Software unlocks that potential.

We’re celebrating software with the opening of our new major exhibition, Make Software: Change the World!

Make Software explores the history, impact, and technology behind seven software applications that have transformed our lives, including MRI, MP3, Car Crash Simulation, Texting, Wikipedia, Photoshop, and World of Warcraft. It presents new ways of thinking about software, uncovering its storied past and its current impact all the while encouraging viewers to imagine a world where almost anything is possible because of software. Make Software comprises 6,000 square feet of interactive exhibition space, anchored by a software lab that enables visitors of all ages to understand software and the concepts of programming through multimedia interactive stations.

Click here for more information about Make Software: Change the World!
Jan 22, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Make Software Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jan 17, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
How the World Builds Software
GitHub CEO Chris Wanstrath in Conversation with Fortune Senior Writer Michal Lev-Ram
Join us as GitHub CEO and Co-founder Chris Wanstrath sits down with Fortune Senior Writer Michal Lev-Ram to discuss the fascinating story of GitHub’s growth, the most amazing pieces of software built on the platform, and his vision for the future of coding education.
Launched in 2008, social-coding site GitHub supports over 15 million users who use the online platform to collaborate, build, and store software. Appealing to organizations with a large base of software developers, including Google, NASA, and even the White House, GitHub taps into the growing enthusiasm for open source projects and currently houses the world’s largest collection of public software. The site’s popularity among its user community has also attracted attention and dollars from major investors, including Sequoia Capital and Andreessen Horowitz. Last year, the company raised $250 million, valuing it at more than $2 billion.

GitHub CEO Chris Wanstrath, who was named to Fortune's 40 Under 40 in 2015, likens the medium to Facebook but for programmers. “You log in, you’re connected to people, but instead of seeing photos of their baby, you see their code,” he says.

Join us as GitHub CEO and Co-founder Chris Wanstrath discusses the fascinating story of GitHub’s growth, the most amazing pieces of software built on the platform, and his vision for coding education. Wanstrath sits down with Fortune Senior Writer Michal Lev-Ram, who covers technology for both Fortune magazine and its website. She is also co-chair of Fortune's Brainstorm Tech conference and Most Powerful Women Next Gen event. Her outstanding reporting contributed to Fortune winning a SABEW Best in Business Award for its technology coverage in 2012.

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2016 Events

Dec 7, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Preservation Game
Saving Bletchley Park Author Sue Black in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Join us as Sue Black discusses her book, her life and career, and the campaign that saved Bletchley Park.
The destruction of cultural heritage sites cannot always be avoided, but for every instance of nature devastating a historical landmark there are easily as many cases where mankind knowingly and willfully destroys its own history in the name of progress, profit, or real estate. Losses like that can be averted, and often are thanks to the efforts of historically-minded individuals that galvanize populations and decision makers into rethinking plans for redevelopment of landmarks. In those cases, there’s usually a good story to go along with it.

That’s the case with Sue Black and Bletchley Park. Black, a single mother of three, began taking math courses while living in a women’s refuge. Those classes led to an undergraduate degree from South Bank University and, eventually, a PhD from the same institution. After becoming a Senior Research Associate at University College London, Black organized a web and social media campaign, making exceptional use of Twitter and Facebook, to preserve Bletchley Park, the headquarters for British decryption programs during World War II. Her book, Saving Bletchley Park, details the preservation initiative and was the fastest crowdfunded book of all time.

Join us as Sue Black discusses her book, her life and career, and the campaign that saved Bletchley Park.
We are very pleased that Books, Inc. will be selling copies of Saving Bletchley Parkbefore and after the program.
Dec 4, 2016 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Cracking the Code Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Humans have been using code to share information for centuries. In this workshop, participants will discover different ways people have communicated over time, from Incan Quipu to Morse Code, uncover the motivations behind code writing, and explore how computers read and interpret code today.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Nov 18, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Working on ENIAC
Rethinking the Myths of Innovation with ENIAC in Action author Thomas Haigh
Join us as Thomas Haigh discusses his new book and the men and, in particular, women involved in the creation of design of the ENIAC.
Books and shows about the history of information technology have usually focused on great inventors and technical breakthroughs, from Charles Babbage and Alan Turing to Steve Jobs and the World Wide Web. Work by non-geniuses, particularly operations work, has been written out of the popular history of innovation, but without it no computer would be useful. Information historian Thomas Haigh is writing it back in.

This talk will focus on ENIAC, the first general purpose electronic computer, based on research for his book ENIAC in Action: Making and Remaking the Modern Computer, recently published by MIT Press. Haigh’s book explains that the six women now celebrated as the “first computer programmers” were actually hired as computer operators and worked hands-on with the machine around the clock. Other women, who actually built ENIAC, have been forgotten entirely, as have the contributions of other people working on vital aspects of the project, from procuring the right kind of wire to saving ENIAC from flood water. Haigh’s concluding comments relate this historical material to the human labor and physical infrastructure today vanishing from public view into the “cloud.”

Join us as Thomas Haigh discusses his new book and the men and, in particular, women involved in the creation of design of the ENIAC.
We are very pleased that Books, Inc. will be selling copies of ENIAC in Action before and after the program.
Nov 18, 2016 5:00 PM Special Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is hosting a Star Wars night!
Join the CHM team on Friday, November 18 to bring fun back to the Silicon Valley Galaxy.
Join the CHM team on Friday, November 18 to bring fun back to the Silicon Valley Galaxy.

Bring your light sabers and learn the basics to defend yourself against dark forces. Dress up as your favorite Star Wars character and get 10% off at the CHM Store (Star Wars items available). Participate in our Star Wars character costume contest. Refuel your engines by enjoying themed drinks at Mos Eisley Cantina (a.k.a. the Cloud Bistro. Think you know the Star Wars universe? Explore earthly locations where scenes of the famed movies were filmed with Liquid Galaxy and take photos at our photo station and share them on social media!

Enjoy these themed activities in addition to our regularly scheduled Friday Nights @CHM activities:
-Feast on cuisine from food trucks, coordinated by Off the Grid
-Explore the Museum exhibits until 9pm!
-Purchase general admission tickets at 50% off!
-Enjoy a variety of drinks from the Cloud Bistro

Whether you are on the dark side or support the rebel alliance, Star Wars night at CHM is sure to be a good time! All humans, droids, and creatures welcomed.
Nov 16, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Next Billion
Kiva Executive Chairman Julie Hanna in Conversation with Exponentials' Marguerite Gong Hancock
Join us for a fascinating fireside chat between technologist, serial entrepreneur, and advisor Julie Hanna with Exponential's Marguerite Gong Hancock.
The great advances in the world have often aggravated the inequities in the world. The least needy see the most improvement, and the most needy see the least--in particular the billion people who live on less than a dollar a day.Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft and philanthropist


Among Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, talk of the next billion often conjures up visions of creating the next “unicorn” company, with private valuation that tops $1 billion. Technology innovation and economic valuation often go hand in hand. But what of social impact?
A growing number of innovators and entrepreneurs are focused on the next billion people who are digitally excluded, many of whom live in extreme poverty, globally and locally. For example, since its first loan to a fishmonger in Uganda, Kiva, the world's largest crowdlending marketplace for underserved entrepreneurs, has allowed people to lend money via the Internet to underserved entrepreneurs. Kiva has crowdfunded more than one million loans to more than 2.1 million entrepreneurs in 82 countries, totaling nearly $1 billion dollars with a repayment rate over 97 percent.

How are entrepreneurs changing the lives of the next billion, one by one? How is technology being used as a force for democratization of access and opportunity? Where are hot spots around the world for entrepreneurship and what can Silicon Valley learn from them? What are some positive roles for government? Is there a way to dismantle the false choice between purpose and profit?

Join us for a fascinating fireside chat between Julie Hanna, Kiva executive chairman and Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship, with Exponential’s Marguerite Gong Hancock.
This Exponential Center event is part of Global Entrepreneurship Week, the world’s largest celebration of the innovators and job creators who launch startups that bring ideas to life, drive economic growth and expand human welfare. During one week each November, thousands of events in 160 countries inspire millions to engage in entrepreneurial activity while connecting them to potential collaborators, mentors and even investors. Powered by the Kauffman Foundation, the initiative is supported by dozens of world leaders and a network of more than 15,000 partner organizations. GEW is held November 14-20, 2016.
Nov 12, 2016 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Design_Code_Build Family Workshop
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Nov 6, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Airbnb's Vibha Bamba
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Nov 5, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Mentors' Special Edition Featuring Miss CEO Founder Nita Singh Kaushal
Level 1: Introductory
This special event welcomes mentors and their middle school-aged mentees to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Mentor pairs will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology...
Mentor pairs and groups supported by organizations throughout the Bay Area are invited to participate in a special Design_Code_Build event!

This special event welcomes mentors and their middle school-aged mentees to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Mentor pairs will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to "program" each other through a life-sized maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. The event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.

This Design_Code_Build program is a one-day event filled with hands-on experiences that provide opportunities for mentors and students to learn with and from each other and become inspired as they share ideas. Students will also see engineering, science, technology and math as exciting adventures that they can participate in. The event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who will share the knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion gained through their personal journey.

Please note that this event is for students in grades 6 through 8 and their adult mentors. Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Oct 26, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Exponential Center and NextGen Advisory Board
Day of the Dead: Postmortems of Silicon Valley Failures
In Conversation with Twitch's Justin Kan, CrowdSmart's Kim Polese, and Garage Technology Ventures' Bill Reichert
Day of the Dead
Join us as Silicon Valley veterans Justin Kan, co-founder of Twitch, Kim Polese, chairman of ClearStreet, and Bill Reichert, managing director of Garage Technology Ventures, share postmortems of their industry successes and failures.
The most famous startup stories often have storybook endings: founders hatch daring and disruptive ideas, secure funding by venture capitalists, create billion dollar companies, and change the world. But for every big success, there are many more tech companies that fail.

Silicon Valley is unique in its toleration--and even celebration--of failure. Failure is not a badge of honor for its own sake, but an acceptable cost on the way to success: “Fail fast. Succeed Faster.”

Even entrepreneurs known for being winners go through failures of many stripes--fizzles, flops, false steps, even frauds. Some are permanent; others are hard-won lessons on the way to the next big thing.

What can we learn from some epic (and more quiet) failures? What differentiates between productive failure and fatal failure? What signs should entrepreneurs heed to declare a failed product, service, or start-up dead? In dark times, what are effective strategies to re-boot? How do the best failures yield valuable lessons and spawn something new?

Justin Kan is an internet entrepreneur and partner at seed fund Y Combinator. Justin has founded many companies including: Kiko, the first AJAX web calendar; Justin.tv, a live video streaming platform; Socialcam, a mobile video sharing app (acquired for $60mm by Autodesk in 2012); Twitch, a video game streaming platform (acquired by for $970mm by Amazon in 2014); and Exec, an on demand maid service (acquired by Handybook in 2014).

Kim Polese is a technology entrepreneur and business leader. She currently serves as Chairman of CrowdSmart, a collective intelligence platform that accelerates startup traction and funding and helps investors identify promising startups. Kim is also Chairman of ClearStreet, whose employer-sponsored financial wellness platform makes healthcare more affordable and helps people build longterm financial health.

Kim has an established history of working on ground-breaking technologies. She began her career at IntelliCorp helping Fortune 100 companies use AI expert systems, and later moved into product management at Sun Microsystems where she led the launch of Java in 1995. Kim then co-founded Internet software pioneer Marimba, serving as President, CEO and Chairman and leading the company to profitability, an IPO and a successful acquisition by BMC.


Bill Reichert is Managing Director of Garage Technology Ventures. Since 1998, Bill and Garage have helped many great companies get their start, including Pandora Media, LeftHand Networks, Kaboodle, WhiteHat Security, Tripwire, and D.light Design. Prior to co-founding Garage, Bill was a co-founder or senior executive in several venture-backed technology startups, including Trademark Software, The Learning Company, and Academic Systems.

Join us as Silicon Valley veterans Justin Kan, co-founder of Twitch, Kim Polese, Chairman of CrowdSmart, and Bill Reichert, managing director of Garage Technology Ventures, share postmortems of their industry successes and failures.

Oct 21, 2016 Special Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Celebrate Halloween at CHM!
What is Halloween without a scary movie? On October 21, Friday Nights @CHM is taking over the Museum and celebrating scary movies and the technology behind them! Enjoy scary movie-themed trivia, explore haunted locations around the world, and venture into the unknown to discover CHM with a scavenger hunt.

Dress up in your costume to receive 10 percent off at the CHM Store! Seasonal drinks will be offered by Cloud Bistro.

Cheers to scary movies, computers, and Halloween!
What is Halloween without a scary movie? On October 21, Friday Nights @CHM is taking over the Museum and celebrating Halloween with scary movies and the technology behind them!


• Grab your favorite treats from Off the Grid food trucks
• Enjoy scary movie-themed trivia
• Dress up in a costume and receive 10% off in the CHM Store
• Explore haunted places around the world with Google Galaxy
• Discover CHM with a scavenger hunt
• Enjoy seasonal drinks available for purchase in the Cloud Bistro


Cheers to scary movies, computers, and Halloween!


Oct 16, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Oct 15, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8. Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Oct 1, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Planet's Matthew Ferraro
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Sep 25, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Quip's Brina Lee
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Sep 24, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Credit Karma's David Reiman
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Sep 22, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Pioneers of the Possible: Women Entrepreneurs on Innovation and Impact
Heidi Roizen and Michelle Zatlyn in Conversation with Exponential Center's Marguerite Gong Hancock
Pioneers of the Possible
Pioneers of the Possible: Women Entrepreneurs on Innovation and Impact Heidi Roizen and Michelle Zatlyn in conversation with Marguerite Gong Hancock.
Silicon Valley is home to pioneers of the possible. From Bill Hewlett and David Packard to Mark Zuckerberg, history, media, and pop culture frequently showcase the stories of Silicon Valley’s male founders. What about women?

While tech companies and venture capitalists today are starting to actively support rising female stars, women entrepreneurs often are unheralded. During the past two years, female founders raising Series A capital jumped from 10 percent to 14 percent in 2015, but they are still too rare. What can we learn from successful women entrepreneurs who have forged their own paths for innovation and impact?

Heidi Roizen is a venture capitalist, Stanford lecturer, and “recovering entrepreneur.” In 1983 she co-founded software company T/Maker and served as CEO for over a dozen years until its acquisition. After a year as VP of Worldwide Developer Relations at Apple, she became a venture capitalist, and is now the operating partner at DFJ. She serves on the the board of directors for DMGT, ICIX, Intematix, ShareThis, and Zoox and lectures at Stanford on entrepreneurship.

Michelle Zatlyn is co-founder and head of user experience for CloudFlare, a web performance and security company selected by the Wall Street Journal as the "Most Innovative Internet Technology Company" for two successive years and member of the unicorn club, with a private valuation of more than $1 billion. Zatlyn has been named "Young Global Leader" by the World Economic Forum and "40 Under 40” leaders by the San Francisco Business Times.

Join us as these remarkable women founders sit down with Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to share their entrepreneurial journeys.
Sep 21, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
A Tale of Deleted Cities
A Conversation with GeoCities Co-founder David Bohnett | Introduction by
A Tale of Deleted Cities
Join us as GeoCities co-founder David Bohnett sits down with Museum CEO John Hollar to share the story of the web-hosting site from its founding to its preservation. The program will include a brief introduction from artist Richard Vijgen.
Before Facebook and Myspace, GeoCities housed the web’s largest online community. Started in 1994 as Beverly Hills Internet, the site’s tens of millions of "homesteaders" created personal pages in theme-based neighborhoods of their choice. Those neighborhoods started out as webcams in real places in Los Angeles—one in the gay mecca of West Hollywood, another in Beverly Hills for high-end shopping. But when GeoCities invited users to add their own pages on those themes, a virtual land rush began. After a spectacular IPO, GeoCities was bought by Yahoo! in 1999 for over $3 billion.

Yahoo! eventually decided GeoCities was obsolete. All 38 million pages of the main English-language site were to be erased in October 2009 until hacker preservationists from The Internet Archive, Archive Team, and other volunteers stepped in. To showcase the tens of millions of pages they preserved, artist Richard Vijgen created an interactive visualization of the 650-gigabyte backup of GeoCities, titled "Deleted City," now on display at the Computer History Museum.

Join us as GeoCities co-founder David Bohnett sits down with Museum CEO John Hollar to share the story of the social media and web-hosting site from its founding to its preservation. The program will include a brief introduction from artist Richard Vijgen.
Artist Richard Vijgen will be available to answer questions near the Deleted City exhibit located in the Museum lobby.
Sep 9, 2016 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Screens
Silicon Cowboys, hosted by Friday Nights @CHM
Please join us for this special screening of Silicon Cowboys, hosted by Friday Nights @CHM. After the screening, film director Jason Cohen will be available to take questions from the audience.
Launched in 1981 by three friends in a Houston diner, Compaq Computer set out to build a portable PC to take on IBM, the world’s most powerful technology company. Many companies had tried cloning the industry leader’s code, only to be trounced by IBM and its high-priced lawyers. Silicon Cowboys explores the remarkable David versus Goliath story, and eventual demise, of Compaq, an unlikely upstart who altered the future of computing and helped shape the world as we know it today.

Directed by Academy Award®-nominated director Jason Cohen, the film offers an insider's look into the explosive rise of the 1980's PC industry and is a refreshing alternative to the familiar narratives of Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg.

“This is a well-told piece of history—a David versus Goliath story that pits Compaq against IBM — that can be enjoyed by tech types and the rest of us, too." —San Francisco Chronicle

“A lively look at an underexposed tech-biz success story.” —The Hollywood Reporter

Silicon Cowboys offers a vivid and evocative portrait” and is “by turns amusing and illuminating.” —Variety

Please join us for this special screening of Silicon Cowboys, hosted by Friday Nights @CHM. After the screening, film director Jason Cohen will be available to take questions from the audience.
Aug 17, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Cleanrooms and Dirty Water: The Environmental Legacy of Silicon Valley
Cleanrooms and Dirty Water: The Environmental Legacy of Silicon Valley
Silicon Valley, the world’s most dynamic center of digital innovation, has more EPA Superfund sites than any other region in the United States. In this talk, Christophe Lécuyer, professor of the history of science and technology at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris, reconstructs the chemical handling and disposal practices of semiconductor firms that left behind this environmental legacy and were the source of high illness rates among Silicon Valley workers.
Silicon Valley, the world’s most dynamic center of digital innovation, has more Superfund sites than any other region in the United States. In this talk, Christophe Lécuyer, professor of the history of science and technology at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris, reconstructs the chemical handling and disposal practices of semiconductor firms that caused this environmental debacle and were the source of high illness rates among Silicon Valley workers.

Lecuyer also investigates the controversies that brought the region’s health and water contamination crises to light in the late 1970s and first half of the 1980s. These controversies were initiated by radical labor activists interested in unionizing Silicon Valley. In order to mobilize workers and build community support for the organizing of the semiconductor industry, they attacked corporate negligence regarding employee safety and health and the storage of toxic chemicals. Their campaign led to a revolution in safety in Silicon Valley and large-scale environmental remediation efforts supervised by the Federal government.

Join us at the Computer History Museum as Professor Christophe Lécuyer investigates the environmental history of Silicon Valley.
Aug 7, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring NASA's Anima Patil-Sabale
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Aug 7, 2016 10:00 AM Education Series
CHM Summer Workshops
Cracking the Code Family Workshop
Humans have been using codes to communicate and share information for centuries. In this workshop, participants will uncover the motivations behind code-writing, and explore how code is used by computers today.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Humans have been using codes to communicate and share information for centuries. In this workshop, participants will uncover the motivations behind code-writing, and explore how code is used by computers today.

The Computer History Museum’s Summer Workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Aug 6, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Educators' Edition Featuring LightUp's Josh Chan
Level 1: Introductory
Design_Code_Build for Educators combines elements of both the introductory and intermediate student programs, helping K12 classroom teachers and community educators explore concepts of computer programming, work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, and discover meaningful strategies for incorporating computer science and computer history into cross-curricular learning environments.
Design_Code_Build for Educators combines elements of both the introductory and intermediate student programs, helping K12 classroom teachers and community educators explore concepts of computer programming, work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, and discover meaningful strategies for incorporating computer science and computer history into cross-curricular learning environments. Educators will benefit as they gain experience and discuss how to create a framework of support that can enhance student learning.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes educators from around the Bay Area to a one-day event that will provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and explore the intersection of history and engineering, science, technology, and math. The event will feature a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who will share his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. The rock stars will explore their personal journey and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest.

This program is appropriate for educators who work with students in all grades from K through 12.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Aug 2, 2016 10:00 AM Education Series
CHM Summer Workshops
Make Software Workshop for Children Entering Grades 3-5
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, students will explore the myriad impacts of software and investigate ways that they too can be makers of software. Students will use Raspberry Pi computers, learning about ways they can create software, while completing a group project.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, students will explore the myriad impacts of software and investigate ways that they too can be makers of software. Students will use Raspberry Pi computers, learning about ways they can create software, while completing a group project.

The Computer History Museum’s Summer Workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This is a public workshop, and is open to students in elementary school. No previous knowledge or experience is required. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jul 23, 2016 10:00 AM Education Series
CHM Summer Workshops
Design_Code_Build Family Workshop
The Design_Code_Build workshop explores how our relationship with computers has changed as input/output methods have evolved over time. This workshop will highlight historical methods of input/output and explore modern methods of input/output through physical computing using Raspberry Pi technology.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
The Design_Code_Build workshop explores how our relationship with computers has changed as input/output methods have evolved over time. This workshop will highlight historical methods of input/output and explore modern methods of input/output through physical computing using Raspberry Pi technology.

The Computer History Museum’s Summer Workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jul 10, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Google's Patrick Clary
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jul 9, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring YouTube's Stephanie Leung
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jul 7, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
How to Spy on 600 Million People: Hidden Vulnerabilities in Chinese IT
How to Spy on 600 Million People
The rise of Input Method Editors (IMEs) in China has had a profound impact on Chinese computing, making it today perhaps the fastest text input languages on earth due to its heavy reliance on predictive text, autocompletion, shortcuts, and abbreviations. At the same time, the rise of IMEs carries with it a profound security vulnerability that no one has discussed before.

Join us as Professor Thomas Mullaney goes behind the scenes of Chinese IT to reveal the security vulnerabilities of IMEs.
The rise of Input Method Editors (IMEs) in China has had a profound impact on Chinese computing, making it today perhaps the fastest text input languages on earth due to its heavy reliance on predictive text, autocompletion, shortcuts, and abbreviations. At the same time, the rise of IMEs carries with it a profound security vulnerability that no one has discussed before.

Drawing on over a decade of research into the history of Chinese information technology in the modern age, Professor Thomas Mullaney addresses a hidden security vulnerability in Chinese IT that enables the surveillance of all Chinese computer users by the state or private interests—even when using seemingly "offline" or "private" programs like Microsoft Word, NotePad, TextEdit, and more. At a time when many of us have become wary of state surveillance over private communications—phone calls, text messages, and emails—this talk alerts us to ways in which it has become possible, in theory if not in practice, to spy upon any and all text input.

Join us as Professor Mullaney goes behind the scenes of Chinese IT to reveal the security vulnerabilities of IMEs.
Jun 18, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Father's Day Special Edition, Featuring Google's Arda Akman
Level 1: Introductory
This special event welcomes fathers to join their middle school-aged children in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. The event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. As families learn with and from each other, students will see their parents as life-long learners; parents will have opportunities to explore, create, and learn alongside and from their students; and everyone will gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators.
This special event welcomes fathers to join their middle school-aged children in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. The event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. As families learn with and from each other, students will see their parents as life-long learners; parents will have opportunities to explore, create, and learn alongside and from their students; and everyone will gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators.

The Design_Code_Build student program welcomes middle schoolers from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Please note that this event is for fathers with students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 5, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Planet Labs' Patrick Yeon
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 4, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring NASA's Ali Guarneros Luna
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 3, 2016 11:30 AM Special Events
Exponential Center: 1 to 1 Billion
Creating Exponential Impact in Silicon Valley
Pioneers John Doerr, Mike Lee, Regis McKenna, Jay Last, and Gordon Moore
One idea, combined with the entrepreneurial spirit of founders, venture capitalists, influencers, and changemakers, can create a billion devices, generate a billion dollars, or touch a billion people. The exponential power of innovation combined with entrepreneurship surrounds us: one set of Fairchild notebooks catalyzed the creation of semiconductor chips that power billions of devices; one business plan turned into Apple, a $500 billion company that...
One idea, combined with the entrepreneurial spirit of founders, venture capitalists, influencers, and changemakers, can create a billion devices, generate a billion dollars, or touch a billion people. The exponential power of innovation combined with entrepreneurship surrounds us: one set of Fairchild notebooks catalyzed the creation of semiconductor chips that power billions of devices; one business plan turned into Apple, a $500 billion company that has sold more than one billion devices; one person’s quest to lose weight created a community that has made a mark on the $55 billion digital health market.

How did the stars of these exponential stories fare in the face of risk and reward? How do pioneering entrepreneurs develop their vision? What are the roles of hard work and luck? How do innovators collaborate with Valley venture investors and other experts to navigate uncharted waters? What difficult decisions yield the greatest impact?

Join us for three panel discussions to celebrate the launch of the Computer History Museum’s Exponential Center, an exciting new center focused on innovation and entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley and around the world. These conversations provide a window into Silicon Valley from pioneers at crucial junctures―the birth of Fairchild, Intel and the semiconductor industry in the 1960s, the shaping of Apple’s and Intel’s first products in the 1980s, and the recent rise of digital health.

Session I
Fairchild Semiconductor Co-founder Jay Last joins the Museum’s Center for Software History Director David Brock to discuss the birth and rise of silicon technology, with video commentary from Fairchild and Intel Co-founder Gordon Moore.

Session II
Marketing trailblazer Regis McKenna teams with Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to discuss the evolution of tech innovation and marketing, from Apple and Intel to today’s big data environment.

Session III
Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers (KPCB) Chair John Doerr leads a conversation with MyFitnessPal Co-founders Mike Lee and Albert Lee about the dynamic between entrepreneur and investor through periods of growth and change.

This event is a part of the Computer History Museum's new center on entrepreneurship and innovation, the Exponential Center. The Exponential Center at the Computer History Museum is capturing the legacy—and advancing the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact. The center’s work focuses on five integrated initiatives: collections and exhibitions, research and insights, education, events, and thought leadership.
May 14, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build with Rock Star Alvaro Prieto
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
May 7, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Mother's Day Special Edition Featuring Google's Katherine Kuan
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build student program welcomes middle schoolers from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
This special event welcomes mothers to join their middle school-aged children in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. The event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. As families learn with and from each other, students will see their parents as life-long learners; parents will have opportunities to explore, create, and learn alongside and from their students; and everyone will gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators.

The Design_Code_Build student program welcomes middle schoolers from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Please note that this event is for mothers with students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Apr 29, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The History (and the Future) of Software
A Lecture by IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center's Grady Booch
Computing hardware resides in the physical world: we can see these artifacts, touch them, move them, study them. The software that brings life to that hardware lives in an ethereal world, largely hidden from observation. And yet, the story of software is just as compelling as that of hardware: both worlds are filled with stories of ambition, invention, creativity, vision, avarice, and serendipity. Just as we can identify clear eras in the evolution of computing hardware, so too can we name the epochs of software.
Computing hardware resides in the physical world: we can see these artifacts, touch them, move them, study them. The software that brings life to that hardware lives in an ethereal world, largely hidden from observation. And yet, the story of software is just as compelling as that of hardware: both worlds are filled with stories of ambition, invention, creativity, vision, avarice, and serendipity. Just as we can identify clear eras in the evolution of computing hardware, so too can we name the epochs of software.

In this lecture, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center's Grady Booch will take audiences on a journey that explores the evolution of software, from the time when computers were human to the present, where we live in a veritable sea of software. Along the way, Booch will look at historically interesting examples of software and study the evolution of the process and the tools of software development. Even now, the nature of software and software development is under rapid transformation, so Booch will conclude with some observations about the future of software.
Apr 26, 2016 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Alibaba and Jack Ma: Beyond E-commerce and China—Implications for Silicon Valley
Author Duncan Clark in Conversation with the Museum’s Marguerite Gong Hancock
Alibaba and Jack Ma: Beyond E-commerce and China—Implications for Silicon Valley
Alibaba: The House That Jack Ma Built is a story of how one entrepreneur, Jack Ma, used his charisma, ambition, and unrelenting determination to build a company that surprised the world. Today the dominant player in China’s e-commerce market, the company is testing the limits of the private sector’s potential to reshape the country’s economy. At the same time, Alibaba’s $25 billion IPO was the largest global IPO in history, and it is extending its reach around the world through e-commerce, finance, entertainment, and beyond. What are the implications for China and for Silicon Valley?

We bring together Marguerite Gong Hancock of the Computer History Museum with Duncan Clark, the author of the new book that digs deep into the remarkable journey of Jack Ma.
Alibaba: The House That Jack Ma Built, by Duncan Clark, is the story of an entrepreneur whose remarkable charisma, ambition, and unrelenting determination helped build a company that surprised the world.

In just a decade and a half, Jack Ma, a man from modest beginnings who started out as an English teacher, built Alibaba into one of the world’s largest companies, rivaling Walmart and Amazon. In 2014 Alibaba’s $25 billion IPO was the largest global IPO in history. A Rockefeller of his time who is courted by CEOs and presidents around the world, Ma is an icon for China’s booming private sector and the gatekeeper to hundreds of millions of middle-class consumers.

Alibaba is a story of East vs. West. How did an upstart company in China take on the giants of Silicon Valley, ultimately joining their ranks to become one of the world’s most successful Internet businesses? Alibaba is also a story of North vs. South. As Beijing government leaders attempt to wean the country off the old economic model of manufacturing and exports, do entrepreneurs far from the northern seat of government power, like Jack Ma, hold the keys to a consumer-led future in new frontiers, from finance to entertainment and beyond?

Marguerite Gong Hancock, executive director of the Exponential Center, the Museum’s new center for entrepreneurship and innovation and co-founder and former director of China 2.0 at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, hosted Jack Ma twice as a keynote speaker in the Valley. Marguerite will engage in a dynamic conversation with Duncan Clark on Jack Ma and Alibaba, the leader and the company that symbolize China’s current economic transformation. Duncan Clark first met Jack in 1999 in the small apartment where Jack founded Alibaba. Granted unprecedented access to a wealth of new material, including exclusive interviews, Clark draws on his own experience as an early adviser to Alibaba as well as his two decades in China chronicling the Internet’s impact on the country. Please join us.

“Anybody who thinks the Chinese just copy or steal technology from the West should read this book and think again. Jack Ma is part Bill Gates, part Steve Jobs, part Larry Page, part Sergei Brin, and part Mark Zuckerberg all rolled into one.”

—Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO of WPP

“...This book is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the present China and the heartbeat of a great entrepreneur.”

—Tim Draper, Founder of Draper Associates, DFJ, and Draper University

“Useful, business-minded reporting on an unconventional corporate magnate, containing both corporate and human-interest perspectives.”

—Kirkus Books Inc. will be on-site selling copies of Alibaba: The House That Jack Ma Built before and after the program. A book signing with author Duncan Clark will immediately follow the program.
Apr 21, 2016 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Technological Indian
Author Ross Bassett in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
The rise of India as a technological and engineering force, and the parallel rise of Indian engineers and executives to the pinnacle of the industry, is a success story played out over 150 years of history. At the heart of that story is a fascinating relationship between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a higher education infrastructure in India that spurred the growth of the Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT), modeled after MIT. In his new book The Technological Indian (2016, Harvard University Press), Professor Ross Bassett traces that international history, drawing on a unique database of every Indian to graduate from MIT between its founding and 2000.
The rise of India as a technological and engineering force, and the parallel rise of Indian engineers and executives to the pinnacle of the industry, is a success story played out over 150 years of history. At the heart of that story is a fascinating relationship between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a higher education infrastructure in India that spurred the growth of the Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT), modeled after MIT. In his new book The Technological Indian (2016, Harvard University Press), Professor Ross Bassett traces that international history, drawing on a unique database of every Indian to graduate from MIT between its founding and 2000. Bassett will chart this group’s ascent to the top levels of high-tech professions around the world in an engaging talk based on research conducted for his new book.

As a group of Indians sought a way forward for their country, they saw a future in technology. Bassett examines the tensions and surprising congruencies between this technological vision and Mahatma Gandhi’s nonindustrial modernity. The book shows how India’s first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, sought to use MIT-trained engineers to build an India where the government controlled technology for the benefit of the people. In the private sector, Indian business families sent their sons to MIT, while MIT graduates established India’s information technology industry.

By the 1960s, IIT students were drawn to the United States for graduate training and many of them stayed, becoming prominent industrialists, academics, and entrepreneurs. The MIT-educated Indian engineer became an integral part of a global system of technology-based capitalism. Yet, as Bassett shows, many focused less on India and its problems—a generation of technological Indians created without the regard for a technological India originally envisioned by the founders.

Please join us for a fascinating discussion with The Technological Indian author Ross Bassett and Museum CEO John Hollar.
Apr 16, 2016 6:00 PM Fellow Awards
CHM Presents
2016 Fellow Awards
Honoring the Past. Inspriring the Future.
Fellow Awards
The Fellow Awards is a signature program of the Computer History Museum. Since 1987, CHM’s Fellow Awards have honored distinguished technology leaders who have forever changed our world. This prestigious honor recognizes each Fellow’s role in the advancement of computing history, as well as the impact of their contributions. CHM is proud to highlight and preserve the stories of each Fellow to promote technology as a conduit for change and inspire future generations.
Their creativity, passion, and ingenuity have changed the world. They are the legends who have made computing historic.

Please join us for Silicon Valley’s biggest night as technology leaders, innovators, and visionaries around the world gather to celebrate the remarkable contributions of the Computer History Museum’s 2016 Fellow Award honorees.

This year’s honorees are:

David Cutler, for his fundamental contributions to computer architecture, compilers, operating systems, and software engineering.

Lee Felsenstein, for his influence on the technical and social environment of the early personal computing era.

Philip Moorby, for his invention and promotion of the Verilog hardware description language.

The Fellow Awards is a signature program of the Computer History Museum. Since 1987, CHM’s Fellow Awards have honored distinguished technology leaders who have forever changed our world. This prestigious honor recognizes each Fellow’s role in the advancement of computing history, as well as the impact of their contributions. CHM is proud to highlight and preserve the stories of each Fellow to promote technology as a conduit for change and inspire future generations.
The Fellow Awards is an invite-only event. For more information, please e-mail Carina Sweet, csweet@computerhistory.org.
Apr 10, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Apr 9, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Verily Life Sciences' Vicky Demas
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-sized maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 30, 2016 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Screens
Growing the 8 Bit Generation
The documentary Growing the 8 Bit Generation, produced by the 8bit Generation Project, focuses on the Commodore 64’s role in the home computer explosion and the personal computer revolution. The movie features never-before-seen interviews with Jack and Leonard Tramiel, Chuck Peddle, Al Charpentier, Bil Herd, Michael Tomczyk, Dave Rolfe, Richard Garriot, Jeff Minter, and Andy Finkel, as well as Steve Wozniak, Nigel Searle, John Grant, Nolan Bushnell, Al Alcorn, and Joe Decuir.
The documentary Growing the 8 Bit Generation, produced by the 8bit Generation Project, focuses on the Commodore 64’s role in the home computer explosion and the personal computer revolution. The movie features never-before-seen interviews with Jack and Leonard Tramiel, Chuck Peddle, Al Charpentier, Bil Herd, Michael Tomczyk, Dave Rolfe, Richard Garriot, Jeff Minter, and Andy Finkel, as well as Steve Wozniak, Nigel Searle, John Grant, Nolan Bushnell, Al Alcorn, and Joe Decuir.

The 8bit Generation Project is a labor of love and takes its name from the 8-bit microprocessor popular in machines from the early 1970s to the end of the 1980s. The 8-bit generation was characterized by young entrepreneurs, engineers, visionaries, dreamers, and geniuses who wanted to change their lives and ended up changing the world.

Executive Producer Bruno Grampa will join Museum CEO John Hollar for a fireside chat and audience Q&A.
Mar 13, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Autodesk's Tatjana Dzambazova (Special Event for Girls Only)
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.

Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 6, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring SRI International's Yasmina Chitti
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 5, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build (Special Event for Girls Only)
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-sized maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 4, 2016 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Just ∫du It:
How Mathematica, Wolfram|Alpha & the Wolfram Language Came to Be
Forty years ago Stephen Wolfram was a kid who wanted to study physics but didn't like doing math, so he started building software to do math. The result was the creation of Mathematica, which has enabled countless inventions and discoveries for over a quarter of a century and has helped educate generations of technical students. Stephen Wolfram used Mathematica to explore the computational universe of...
Forty years ago Stephen Wolfram was a kid who wanted to study physics but didn't like doing math, so he started building software to do math. The result was the creation of Mathematica, which has enabled countless inventions and discoveries for over a quarter of a century and has helped educate generations of technical students. Stephen Wolfram used Mathematica to explore the computational universe of programs and build a major new direction in basic science. This, in turn, led him to create Wolfram|Alpha, which now provides computational knowledge for millions of people, phones, etc. Stephen Wolfram has had the rare experience of continuously building a stack of technology for more than 30 years, leading now to the recently released Wolfram Language. Stephen Wolfram's work has often been informed by his interest in the history of computers and computational thinking.

This talk will provide a unique first-person view of the evolution of Stephen Wolfram's work and thinking, as well as his interactions with many greats from science and technology.
Feb 23, 2016 7:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Originals Author Adam Grant in Conversation with Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg
<i>Originals</i> Author Adam Grant in Conversation with Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg
The New York Times bestselling author of Give and Take examines how people can champion new ideas—and how leaders can encourage originality in their organizations.
Originals is one of the most important and captivating books I have ever read, full of surprising and powerful ideas. It will not only change the way you see the world; it might just change the way you live your life. And it could very well inspire you to change your world.
Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook and #1 New York Times bestselling author of Lean In


The New York Times bestselling author of Give and Take examines how people can champion new ideas—and how leaders can encourage originality in their organizations.

With Give and Take, Adam Grant not only introduced a landmark new paradigm for success but also established himself as one of his generation’s most compelling and provocative thought leaders. In Originals he again addresses the challenge of improving the world, but now from the perspective of becoming original: choosing to champion novel ideas and values that go against the grain, battle conformity, and buck outdated traditions. How can we originate new ideas, policies, and practices without risking it all?

Using surprising studies and stories spanning business, politics, sports, and entertainment, Grant explores how to recognize a good idea, speak up without getting silenced, build a coalition of allies, choose the right time to act, and manage fear and doubt; how parents and teachers can nurture originality in children; and how leaders can fight groupthink to build cultures that welcome dissent. Learn from an entrepreneur who pitches his start-ups by highlighting the reasons not to invest, a woman at Apple who challenged Steve Jobs from three levels below, an analyst who overturned the rule of secrecy at the CIA, a billionaire financial wizard who fires employees for failing to criticize him, and a TV executive who didn’t even work in comedy but saved Seinfeld from the cutting-room floor. The payoff is a set of groundbreaking insights about rejecting conformity and improving the status quo.

Sheryl Sandberg returns to our stage to moderate what is certain to be a thought provoking, insightful and engaging conversation with Adam Grant. We hope you will join us.

We are very pleased that Books, Inc. will be selling copies of Originals before and after the program.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on site recording this program for broadcast on Thursday, March 3,at 8 p.m.
Feb 21, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build (February 21st)
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Feb 20, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build with Rock Star Mark Castruita of Broadcom
Level 1: Introductory Level
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 event introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-sized maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.


Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.


Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Feb 13, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Intermediate Level. Special event for girls only.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.

Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jan 19, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Thinking Big—Ada Lovelace: Mathematician and Visionary
As part of the Computer History Museum’s (CHM) bicentennial celebration of Ada Lovelace, please join us for an in-depth discussion to gain a deeper understanding of the mathematician and visionary Ada Lovelace. University of Oxford Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science Ursula Martin, Ada Lovelace biographer Dr. Betty Toole, and retired engineer and Charles Babbage expert Tim Robinson will critically explore the complexities of Ada Lovelace within the scope of each of their fields of expertise.
As part of the Computer History Museum’s (CHM) bicentennial celebration of Ada Lovelace, please join us for an in-depth discussion to gain a deeper understanding of the mathematician and visionary Ada Lovelace. University of Oxford Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science Ursula Martin, Ada Lovelace biographer Dr. Betty Toole, and retired engineer and Charles Babbage expert Tim Robinson will critically explore the complexities of Ada Lovelace within the scope of each of their fields of expertise. Topics will include Lovelace’s childhood and lifelong interest in a variety of fields and subjects, her mathematical contributions and their significance within the historical context of Victorian England, her partnership with Charles Babbage and their work together on the Analytical Engine, and her lasting legacy within computer science today.

Current research derived from the Bodleian Libraries’ archive of Lovelace papers will also be presented. This exceptional collection of primary sources, compiled by Lovelace’s mother Annabella Milbanke, provides an intimate glimpse into Lovelace’s remarkable life. Documentation from Lovelace’s childhood includes her governess’ early notes about Lovelace’s daily routine, school workbooks, and diary entries. Later correspondence comprises letters from Lovelace to her tutors, including Augustus De Morgan, Charles Babbage, and other well-known Victorian thinkers.
This event coincides with CHM’s newest exhibit, Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace (December 12, 2015–December 11, 2016). Drawing on the Lovelace papers held at the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries, CHM is the only location in the United States where you can discover these extraordinary papers.
Jan 14, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
An Evening with the U.S. Digital Service Team
An Evening with the U.S. Digital Service Team
Behind the scenes within the Obama Administration, the U.S. Digital Service (USDS) is quietly rethinking - and remaking - the way the federal government harnesses digital technology to serve the nation in the 21st Century. In this Revolutionaries evening, we will meet the brain trust behind this landmark initiative.
I want us to ask ourselves every day, how are we using technology to make a real difference in people’s lives. President Barack Obama


Behind the scenes within the Obama Administration, the U.S. Digital Service (USDS) is quietly rethinking—and remaking—the way the federal government harnesses digital technology to serve the nation in the 21st Century. In this Revolutionaries evening, we will meet the brain trust behind this landmark initiative.

USDS was created in 2014 by the White House and is housed within the Office of Management and Budget. It began as a small team of digital experts who were recruited to repair the HealthCare.gov website. That elite digital team now works in collaboration with other government agencies to make websites more consumer friendly, to identify and fix problems, and to help upgrade the government’s technology infrastructure. Along the way they are saving taxpayers a lot of money as well.

We have assembled a panel of USDS leaders for a conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar about the great work they’re doing to basically redefine the experience of government. They will talk about how they were recruited and why they continue to serve, and what’s so powerful about the idea of "giving back." In addition, they have a steep recruitment goal to hit to help build an ongoing pipeline of tech talent bound for the nation's capitol – and the response to their pitch has been overwhelming.

This is going to be an inspirational evening you won’t want to miss.

We are pleased that KQED Radio will be onsite recording this program for broadcast on Thursday, January 21 at 8pm, and again on Saturday, January 23 at 3pm.

We are very pleased that CSPAN will be recording this program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
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2015 Events

Dec 13, 2015 10:00 AM Special Events
Community Days @CHM
Adafest
Celebrate Computer Pioneer Ada Lovelace with a Day of Fun and Learning for All Ages
Adafest
Visit the Computer History Museum on Sunday, December 13 to celebrate the 200th birthday of Ada Lovelace. Lovelace was an English mathematician and remarkable thinker. Unlike most people of her era, she understood that computers could do much more than calculate numbers, and she predicted many of the ways in which we use technology today.
Visit the Computer History Museum (CHM) on Sunday, December 13 to celebrate the 200th birthday of Ada Lovelace. Lovelace was an English mathematician and remarkable thinker. Unlike most people of her era, she understood that computers could do much more than calculate numbers, and she predicted many of the ways in which we use technology today.

In connection with CHM’s newest exhibit Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace (December 12, 2015–December 11, 2016), Adafest is part of the Museum’s year-long Lovelace celebration and furthers our ongoing initiative to highlight and honor women in technology.

Join us to meet local artisans, uncover the sights and styles of Victorian England, and explore Ada’s life through storytelling, live demonstrations, and tours. We’ll even have a costume contest! The Museum will be open until 7:00 PM, with free admission after 4:00 PM. Museum members can enjoy a special morning reception and shop the store’s Semi-Annual Sale all day, with 25 percent off everything—just in time for the holidays! Museum admission is free from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m.*
Dec 12, 2015 Special Events
Exhibit Opening
Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace
The newest exhibit at the Computer History Museum
Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace
The newest exhibit at the Computer History Museum, Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace, celebrates the 200th birthday of English mathematician and visionary Ada Lovelace (1815–1852). Drawing on the Lovelace papers held at the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries, the Computer History Museum is the only other location in the world where you can discover these extraordinary papers.
The newest exhibit at the Computer History Museum, Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace, celebrates the 200th birthday of English mathematician and visionary Ada Lovelace (1815–1852). Drawing on the Lovelace papers held at the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries, the Computer History Museum is the only other location in the world where you can discover these extraordinary papers.

Ada, Countess of Lovelace, was a remarkable person who was charming, temperamental, inquisitive, and intelligent. Lovelace lived at a time when women couldn’t vote or attend university, but as a member of the upper class, her friends and teachers included some of the greatest thinkers of the time: Charles Babbage, Augustus De Morgan, Charles Dickens, Michael Faraday, and Mary Somerville.

Lovelace was the only legitimate daughter of the famous poet Lord Byron. Though her father abandoned her when she was only one month old, she remained fascinated by him all her life. Her overbearing mother, Annabella Milbanke, steered her away from the arts and towards mathematics and science, afraid Lovelace would develop what she perceived as her estranged husband’s “madness.”

Lovelace was a woman of fierce originality and intellectual interests. Her ideas went beyond those of pioneer Charles Babbage, who saw computers only as number manipulators, and focused on the creative possibilities and limitations of computers—the very issues we wrestle with today.
The Computer History Museum invites you to explore the world of Ada, Countess of Lovelace, through her own words and written in her own hand.
The exhibit will be on view December 12, 2015-December 11, 2016, during regular Museum hours.
Dec 10, 2015 6:00 PM Special Events
Private Event
Thinking Big with YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki & Computer Pioneer Ada Lovelace
Thinking Big with  Susan Wojcicki & Ada Lovelace
Join us for an exclusive evening with YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki in honor of the Museum’s newest exhibit Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace. As we celebrate the bicentennial birthday of English mathematician Ada Lovelace, we not only recognize her numerical prowess, but her imagination and inquisitiveness—her willingness to “think big.”
Join us for an exclusive evening with YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki in honor of the Museum’s newest exhibit Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace. As we celebrate the bicentennial birthday of English mathematician Ada Lovelace, we not only recognize her numerical prowess, but her imagination and inquisitiveness—her willingness to “think big.”

In the spirit of Ada Lovelace and “thinking big,” Wojcicki will join Museum CEO John Hollar in a one on one conversation about her career, the role of women in technology today, the importance of encouraging young girls to pursue STEM-related careers, the future of computing, and her own thoughts about what it means to “think big.”

While Lovelace is perhaps best known for her close partnership with Charles Babbage and her significant 1843 paper “Sketch of the Analytical Engine Invented by Charles Babbage,” she was also a woman of fierce originality and intellectual interests. Her ideas about computers went beyond those of Babbage, who saw computers only as number manipulators. Instead, Lovelace envisioned the creative possibilities of computers—the very issues we grapple with today.

Susan Wojcicki, Google employee number 16 and the only woman CEO under the Alphabet umbrella, is the head of YouTube—the world’s most popular digital video platform used by a billion people across the globe to access information, share video, and shape culture. An early champion of online video, Wojcicki was instrumental in Google’s 2006 acquisition of YouTube. She now oversees YouTube’s content and business operations, engineering, and product development. Wojcicki has also been a major advocate for women in technology.
Invite-Only Event
Dec 9, 2015 6:00 PM Education Event
Computer History Museum and Embark Labs Present
Hour Of Code and Beyond!
Calling all K-8 educators: join us and learn how to keep the energy and excitement of Hour of Code going all year long. The goal of this session is to demystify some foundational concepts of computer science and coding while deepening your understanding of design and computational thinking, in order to create hands-on learning experiences in your classrooms. You will walk away with specific lessons and strategies you can begin using with students right away. You can get a sense of Embark Labs programs from these pictures and videos on our YouTube channel.
Calling all K-8 educators: join us and learn how to keep the energy and excitement of Hour of Code going all year long. The goal of this session is to demystify some foundational concepts of computer science and coding while deepening your understanding of design and computational thinking, in order to create hands-on learning experiences in your classrooms. You will walk away with specific lessons and strategies you can begin using with students right away. You can get a sense of Embark Labs programs from these pictures and videos on our YouTube channel. Light dinner will be provided.
Nov 16, 2015 5:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
The Father of Digital Logic
The Father of Digital Logic
Join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates an engaging conversation about the life and legacy of George Boole with three distinguished guests: Dr. Michael Murphy, president and chair of University College Cork; Nick Kent, founder and creative director of Oxford Film and Television; and Dr. Kieran Drain, CEO of the Tyndall National Institute.
"He was a brilliant thinker, the possessor of a truly original mind. His story is our story: the creation of one of the great intellectual pillars that support our modern world. It is the story of a remarkable man, beautifully told."

- Ian Stewart, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics, University of Warwick, England, and popular-science and science-fiction writer

George Boole was an English mathematician, philosopher, and logician. He specialized in differential equations and algebraic logic, and is now best known as the author of The Laws of Thought.

The huge impact of George Boole on technology today is explored in this stunning new film commissioned by University College Cork, where Boole was its first professor of mathematics. Narrated by Oscar-winning actor Jeremy Irons and produced by multi award-winning Oxford Film and Television, The Genius of George Boole assembles industry leaders and academics from across the globe to explore the life and impact of one of the world’s greatest unsung heroes. This 58-minute film shines new light on the life, work, and legacy of George Boole.

Join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates an engaging conversation, about the life and legacy of George Boole with three distinguished guests: Dr. Michael Murphy, President, University College Cork, Ireland; Ms. Virginia Teehan, Director of Cultural Projects, University College Cork & Commissioning Editor: The Genius of George Boole; and Dr. Kieran Drain, CEO of Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland.
The George Boole celebration is made possible in collaboration with University College Cork, Ireland.
Nov 14, 2015 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring Broadcom's Stephen Palm
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.

Nov 4, 2015 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Antikythera Mechanism: Decoding the World's First Computer
Join us as Tony Freeth presents the early research on the device as well as the remarkable progress of three Antikythera research pioneers—up to the point in 2005 when new scientific investigations were carried out at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. Tom Malzbender then takes up the story by describing a remarkable surface-imaging technique that he invented, which became one of the key tools for investigating the Antikythera Mechanism. He also describes Microfocus X-Ray Computed Tomography (X-Ray CT), which yields high-resolution 3D X-rays. Both techniques were crucial for understanding the Antikythera Mechanism. Tony Freeth returns to reveal the remarkable breakthroughs that came from this new data. The Antikythera Mechanism has emerged as an astronomical calculating machine of spectacular sophistication: one of the wonders of the ancient world and a key landmark in the history of computing.
In 1900 a party of Greek sponge divers chanced on an ancient wreck near the tiny island of Antikythera, between Crete and the Greek mainland. The first ever major underwater archaeology subsequently recovered a spectacular array of ancient Greek treasure. The divers also found a corroded lump, not considered at all important at the time. Then the lump split apart revealing some tiny bronze gearwheels—a shocking discovery for ancient Greece. It was the beginning of an extraordinary voyage of discovery over more than a hundred years as its hidden identity has been gradually decoded. Tony Freeth presents the early research on the device as well as the remarkable progress of three Antikythera research pioneers—up to the point in 2005 when new scientific investigations were carried out at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

Tom Malzbender then takes up the story by describing a remarkable surface-imaging technique that he invented, which became one of the key tools for investigating the Antikythera Mechanism. He also describes Microfocus X-Ray Computed Tomography (X-Ray CT), which yields high-resolution 3D X-rays. Both techniques were crucial for understanding the Antikythera Mechanism. Tony Freeth returns to reveal the remarkable breakthroughs that came from this new data. The Antikythera Mechanism has emerged as an astronomical calculating machine of spectacular sophistication: one of the wonders of the ancient world and a key landmark in the history of computing.
Oct 21, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
How We Got To Now Author Steven Johnson with the Museum's CEO John Hollar
How We Got To Now Author Steven Johnson with the Museum's CEO John Hollar
Join John Hollar as he moderates an engaging conversation with Johnson about everything from how innovation happens and the "hummingbird effect," to the story of two "time travelers" who are very well known to the Computer History Museum (Babbage and Lovelace).
Johnson is especially adept at dismantling the myths of technology creation that seem to distort our political and economic discourse. At various points in ‘How We Got to Now,’ he helps us see how innovation is almost never the result of a lone genius experiencing a sudden voila! moment; it’s a complex process involving a dizzying number of inputs, individuals, setbacks and (sometimes) accidents. Also, it’s hardly the exclusive domain of private-sector entrepreneurs. Important ideas are often driven by academics, governments and philanthropists. Author Jon Gertner
The New York Times' Sunday Book Review
December 26, 2014


We’re pleased to welcome New York Times-bestselling author Steven Johnson to the Museum on the occasion of How We Got To Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World's release in paperback.

Exploring networks of creativity and the "long-zoom" approach to history, Johnson delves into six key areas – glass, cold, sound, clean, time, light – to show how multiple unexpected inventions in each led to the modern life we experience today. Filled with surprising stories of accidental genius and brilliant mistakes, the book investigates the secret history behind the everyday objects of contemporary life.

Join John Hollar as he moderates an engaging conversation with Johnson about everything from how innovation happens and the "hummingbird effect," to the story of two "time travelers" who are very well known to the Computer History Museum (Babbage and Lovelace).

This event includes a book signing immediately following the program. We are pleased that Books, Inc. of Mountain View will be on-site selling copies of How We Got To Now before and after the program.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Oct 17, 2015 9:30 AM Speaker Series
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build All Girls Edition!
Featuring Nitro's Jenn Tran
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a "rock star" - a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.
Sep 27, 2015 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring IBM's Rudy J. Wojtecki
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.

Sep 26, 2015 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents:
Educator Edition Design_Code_Build Featuring Google's Sargun Kaur
Educators! Join us on September 26th for a very special Educator edition of Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build led by the Computer History Museum (DCB)!
Educators! Join us on September 26th for a very special Educator edition of Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build led by the Computer History Museum (DCB)!

This interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) program is a free, one-day event, designed to help educators develop a deeper understanding of computer programming and engineering-minded problem solving. Educators will gain confidence while exploring these topics, allowing them to better support all students as they help them to develop an interest in computer science and other technology-related studies and careers. Inspired educators inspire students!

The DCB program is designed for a middle school age audience, and this Educator edition will be a unique opportunity for educators to experience the day just as our students do! We will explore the concepts of computer programming and coding through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning. Participants will gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi computer, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigating historic methods of computer programming. The event is keynoted by a “Rock Star” – a tech industry luminary who will share his or her personal story and passion.

All classroom teachers and community educators are invited to participate in this program.
Sep 24, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Revolutionaries
MIT's Cynthia Breazeal and Microsoft Research's Eric Horvitz with the BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones
MIT's Cynthia Breazeal and Microsoft Research's Eric Horvitz with the BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones
This Revolutionaries evening not only features two of the world's foremost experts in artificial intelligence, but also opens what we hope will be a new co-production partnership with the BBC World Service, which reaches 190 million listeners per week around the globe.
The final frontier of robotics is actually the human environment and robots need to be social in order to engage with us in a natural way, to be part of our lives.Cynthia Breazeal
ReadWrite, August 2014


My own view is that AI will be incredibly empowering to humanity. It will help solve problems, it will help us do better science, it promises to really help with challenges in education, health care and hunger….I’m very optimistic about machine intelligence, and I see a need for studying and guiding its influences on people and society, and for continuing dialogue with the public.Eric Horvitz
AAAS Science Insider, January, 2015


Artificial Intelligence is remaking our world. In a special edition of Revolutionaries, two of the field’s world-leading figures join the BBC’s Rory Cellan Jones to discuss how.

This Revolutionaries evening not only features two of the world's foremost experts in artificial intelligence, but also opens what we hope will be a new co-production partnership with the BBC World Service, which reaches 210 million listeners per week around the globe.

Returning to our stage is Dr. Eric Horvitz, Distinguished Scientist and Managing Director of Microsoft Research. Dr. Horvitz made a landmark gift to Stanford in December 2014 to fund a century-long study of the effects of artificial intelligence on society: the Stanford 100 Year Study of AI, or AI100. He has been working in the field of AI for more than two decades, and his interests include the computational foundations of intelligence – how do our minds work? - as well as the ways that human and machine intelligence might complement one another.

Joining Dr. Horvitz will be Dr. Cynthia Breazeal, founder and Chief Scientist of the social robotics firm Jibo, and Associate Professor of Media Arts & Sciences at MIT's Media Lab. At MIT she founded and directs the Personal Robots Group. Dr. Breazeal, a pioneer and leader in social robotics, was inspired at an early age by Star Wars, R2D2 and C3PO. She has been quoted as saying that "if R2D2 and an iPad had a baby, it'd be Jibo." In addition to learning more about her work at MIT, we'll inquire about her vision for Jibo and about the company's highly successful crowdfunding campaign - $2.2 million in pre-orders in four hours. Jibo received an additional $25 million funding round from a group of venture investors, and now employs more than 20 people in the Boston area.

These two distinguished guests will discuss a wide range of AI topics, beginning with their backgrounds, education and career paths, and their own projects. We'll then expand the discussion to explore the possible perils of machine "superintelligence" and the huge potential both of our guests see for machines to enhance our lives and to positively impact humanity.

Rory Cellan-Jones, the BBC's Technology Correspondent, will travel from London to moderate.

Because this is a co-production with the BBC World Service, this program will run longer than usual. In addition, the format will be a little different from a traditional CHM evening. More details will be provided to the audience prior to the program's start.

The Museum thanks the Carsten-Ellis Foundation for its support, which helps to make the Computer History Museum’s contribution to this edition of Revolutionaries possible.

KQED Radio will broadcast this program on Thursday, October 8 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

The BBC World Service delivers news content around the world in English and 28 other language services, on radio, TV and digital, reaching a weekly audience of 210 million. As part of BBC World Service, BBC Learning English teaches English to global audiences. For more information, visit bbc.com/worldservice. The BBC attracts a weekly global news audience of 283 million people to its international news services including BBC World Service, BBC World News television channel and bbc.com/news.
Sep 22, 2015 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
SuperBetter Author Jane McGonigal in Conversation with NPR's Laura Sydell
SuperBetter Author Jane McGonigal in Conversation with NPR's Laura Sydell
Jane McGonigal first graced our stage as a Revolutionary in 2011, on her bestselling Reality is Broken book tour, in conversation with NPR’s Laura Sydell. Join us as we welcome the return of McGonigal and Sydell for another enlightening and inspirational conversation about the ways we can harness the power of games to improve our lives.
SUPERBETTER: A Revolutionary Approach to Getting Stronger, Happier, Braver and More Resilient - Powered by the Science of Games

In 2009, game designer and author Jane McGonigal suffered a severe concussion that wouldn’t heal. Unable to think clearly, or work, or even get out of bed, she became anxious and depressed, even suicidal—a common symptom for concussion sufferers. But rather than let herself sink further, she decided to get better by doing what she does best: she turned her recovery process into a game. What started as a simple motivational exercise became a set of rules she shared on her blog. These rules became a digital game, then an online portal and a major research study with the National Institutes of Health. Today more than 400,000 people have played SuperBetter to get happier and healthier.

Jane McGonigal first graced our stage as a Revolutionary in 2011, on her bestselling Reality is Broken book tour, in conversation with NPR’s Laura Sydell. Join us as we welcome the return of McGonigal and Sydell for another enlightening and inspirational conversation about the ways we can harness the power of games to improve our lives.

There will be a book signing immediately following the program’s end. We are pleased that Books, Inc. of Mountain View, will be on-site selling copies of SuperBetter before and after the program.

We are pleased that KQED Radio will be recording this program for broadcast on Wednesday, November 25 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Sep 17, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Medium's Evan Williams & Steven Levy in Conversation with the Museum's John Hollar
Medium's Evan Williams & Steven Levy in Conversation with John Hollar
John Hollar, a former journalist himself, will sit down for an in-depth conversation with Medium's CEO Evan Williams, and the editor-in-chief of its tech hub Backchannel, Steven Levy. Medium was launched in 2012 as a beautiful platform for writers. Levy joined its ranks in 2014 after a distinguished career at WIRED Magazine, among other traditional publishing outlets, because of the opportunity to work with Williams, and to create quality content. Why are over 25 million people visiting Medium monthly and why is that not the only metric Medium uses to measure its success? Medium uses the term 'platishing' to describe this form of journalism – an amalgam of "publishing" and "platform." What is 'platishing,' and how will it influence the future of journalism?
The written word is the most accessible yet powerful form of media there is.Evan Williams
Wired, April 2015


One of the things that I love about Medium is its commitment to experimentation, one that I fully embrace. So a precise description of what this new venture [Backchannel] is going to eventually become is gleefully elusive. But I can tell you this – it will feature not only my own best writing but the work of contributors who share my belief in deeply reported, colorfully rendered stories in and around the tech explosion.Steven Levy
Medium, June 2014


Tonight we continue our Re/New: The Future of News track, a series of conversations with news leaders and innovators about how technology is disrupting the news and journalism industries – from gathering to disseminating, to audience behavior and participation as well.

John Hollar, a former journalist himself, will sit down for an in-depth conversation with Medium's CEO Evan Williams, and the editor-in-chief of its tech hub Backchannel, Steven Levy. Medium was launched in 2012 as a beautiful platform for writers. Levy joined its ranks in 2014 after a distinguished career at Wired Magazine, among other traditional publishing outlets, because of the opportunity to work with Williams, and to create quality content. Why are over 25 million people visiting Medium monthly and why is that not the only metric Medium uses to measure its success? Medium uses the term 'platishing' to describe this form of journalism – an amalgam of "publishing" and "platform." What is 'platishing,' and how will it influence the future of journalism?

Join us tonight to learn the answers to these and so many other questions about Williams' and Levy's vision for Medium and Backchannel, and how they view this "hybrid" company’s place within the ranks of other news and media companies.

We are pleased that KQED Radio will be recording this program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Aug 27, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Machines of Loving Grace Author John Markoff in Conversation with the Museum's John Hollar
Machines of Loving Grace Author John Markoff in Conversation with the Museum's John Hollar
Markoff, who was the first reporter to describe the World Wide Web, travels across the country, from the brain trusts in Palo Alto and Silicon Valley to the expanding tech corridor between Boston—home of MIT—and New York, the latest incubator for future tech development, and evaluates the present state of the A.I. versus I.A. debate. He goes deep inside the science fiction worlds of Battlestar Galactica, Terminator, and the Jetsons, which are fast becoming a reality, and talks to the insiders—scientists, entrepreneurs, ethicists, hackers and others—who are shaping the future. The result is an incisive and chilling look at our lives today—and what may come tomorrow.
As robots are increasingly integrated into modern society—on the battlefield and the road, in business, education, and health—those who design the machines have a stark choice to make. They can design systems to enhance the quality of human work and life-or they can design systems that replace humans entirely. Both approaches will reshape the modern world. In MACHINES OF LOVING GRACE: The Quest for Common Ground Between Humans and Robots, Pulitzer-Prize-winning New York Times reporter John Markoff, explores this issue and searches for an answer to one of the most important questions of our age: will these robots help us . . . or will they replace us?

Markoff, who was the first reporter to describe the World Wide Web, travels across the country, from the brain trusts in Palo Alto and Silicon Valley to the expanding tech corridor between Boston—home of MIT—and New York, the latest incubator for future tech development, and evaluates the present state of the A.I. versus I.A. debate. He goes deep inside the science fiction worlds of Battlestar Galactica, Terminator, and the Jetsons, which are fast becoming a reality, and talks to the insiders—scientists, entrepreneurs, ethicists, hackers and others—who are shaping the future. The result is an incisive and chilling look at our lives today—and what may come tomorrow.

Museum CEO John Hollar will moderate a captivating conversation with John Markoff on the evolution of our relationship with robots and the profound changes the future might hold. Please join us.

Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of John Markoff's book before and after the program.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be recording the program for broadcast on Wednesday, September 2 at 8pm.

And, finally, CSPAN's Book TV will be onsite recording this program for future broadcast.
Aug 9, 2015 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring SRI International's Jeff Klaben
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.
Aug 3, 2015 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
If the Computer Fits, Wear it!
Wearable pioneers Thad Starner and Greg Priest-Dorman in conversation with Museum’s Internet History Program Founder Marc Weber
Pioneers have experimented with wearing computers for half a century. Yet aside from a few specialized applications like fitness trackers, our bodies remain largely free of the smart tech that fills our pockets and purses.
Pioneers have experimented with wearing computers for half a century. Yet aside from specialized applications like fitness trackers and certain industrial uses, our bodies remain largely free of the smart tech that fills our pockets and purses.

Why? Besides larger questions around how wearable computing might fit into our everyday lives, the technology wasn't ready. Early devices were too bulky, hot, isolated, or hard to use to be consumer products. But that may be changing.

Thad Starner, Greg Priest-Dorman and Daniel Siewiorek are major pioneers of wearable computing. But while Dan was developing multiple generations of wearables for industrial and military use, Thad and Greg were focused on a more elusive goal – consumer wearables that could be part worn in daily life. They were both hired as early members of the Google Glass team. They also practice what they preach; both men have been wearing computers daily since the early 1990s.

The traveling exhibit we are hosting this summer, On You: A Story of Wearable Computing, shows consumer, professional, and home-made devices. Curated at Georgia Tech by Starner and design researcher Clint Zeagler, the exhibit explores the four key technical hurdles to making a consumer wearable computer: power and heat, networking, mobile input, and displays. Have they been solved?

Come find out on August 3, and learn more the technology that yearns to be on you!

On You: A Story of Wearable Computing is on display at the Computer History Museum from June 30th to September 20.
Bring a bag lunch and enjoy the discussion with CHM family and friends. Beverages and light snacks will be provided on behalf of the Museum.
Jul 25, 2015 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring Google's Anupam Pathak
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.
Jul 10, 2015 9:30 AM Speaker Series
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring Georgia Tech's Thad Starner
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and working with Museum docents to investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.
Jun 30, 2015 10:00 AM Special Events
New Exhibit Opening
On You: A Story of Wearable Computing
A traveling exhibit by Georgia Institute of Technology
Join us for the opening of On You: A Story of Wearable Computing on display at the Computer History Museum from June 30th to September 20.
Pioneers have experimented with wearing computers for half a century. Yet aside from a few specialized apps like fitness trackers, our bodies remain largely free of the smart tech that fills our pockets and purses.

Why? Besides huge questions around how wearable computing might fit into our social and everyday lives, the technology wasn't ready. Early devices were too bulky, hot, isolated, or hard to use.

Displaying consumer, professional, and home-made devices, On You explores the four key technical hurdles to making a consumer wearable computer: power and heat, networking, mobile input, and displays. Have they been solved? Come find out, and discover the technology that yearns to be on you!

Join us for the opening of On You: A Story of Wearable Computing on display at the Computer History Museum from June 30th to September 20.

This exhibit is created by Georgia Institute of Technology.