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2017 Events

Jul 21, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jul 18, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Building Ships, Companies, and the Cloud
Google Cloud Senior Vice President Diane Greene in Conversation with the Exponential Center's Marguerite Gong Hancock
Diane Greene has designed ships, run engineering teams, and co-founded software virtualization giant VMware. Now she leads Google's cloud business and sits on the boards of Alphabet, Intuit, and MIT. Join us as Greene sits down with Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to discuss her evolution from engineer to entrepreneur, how Silicon Valley has changed throughout her career, and what lies ahead for Google's cloud business.
Whether as an engineer or an entrepreneur, Diane Greene’s career can be best described as “storied.” She has designed naval ships, run engineering teams, and co-founded multiple startups. Now she leads Google’s cloud business and sits on the boards of Alphabet, Intuit, and MIT. How did she evolve from engineer to serial entrepreneur to global executive?

After receiving degrees in mechanical engineering, naval architecture, and computer science from University of Vermont, MIT, and UC Berkeley, respectively, Greene held engineering and management positions for SGI, Tandem, and Sybase. In 1998 she co-founded and served as CEO of virtualization giant VMware. Over the course of 10 years, she took the company public and to a $2 billion run rate. In 2016 Dell Technologies acquired VMware as part of its $67 billion merger with EMC, the largest technology deal in history.

In her role as SVP of Google Cloud, Greene oversees the growth and strategy of a major business partnering with customers like Snapchat, Disney, and eBay. She took on this role in 2015, after Bebop, the cloud developer platform she co-founded, was acquired by Google for $383 million. As the search giant enters a sector dominated by Amazon, Microsoft, and IBM, she has set the ambitious goal to lead the cloud computing market by 2022.

Join us as Diane Greene sits down with Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to share her story, discuss how Silicon Valley has changed throughout her career, and talk about what lies ahead for Google’s Cloud business.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
About the Exponential Center
This event is co-produced by CHM's Exponential Center. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Jul 15, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Make Software Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jul 14, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new!
Jul 11, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Why Software Matters to Government Intelligence
IARPA Director Jason Matheny in Conversation with the Museum's Center for Software History Director David C. Brock
The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), also known as “DARPA for spies,” is the science and technology research arm for the intelligence community. On behalf of the 17 organizations that comprise this community, IARPA invests in “high risk/high payoff” programs to tackle the biggest challenges in intelligence gathering and analysis.

IARPA Director Dr. Jason Matheny joins us to discuss some of the organization’s most exciting research projects, explains how IARPA approaches research investment, and tells us why software matters to the intelligence community.
The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), also known as “DARPA for spies,” is the science and technology research arm for the intelligence community in the Office of the Director for National Intelligence. On behalf of the 17 military and civilian agencies and organizations that comprise this community, IARPA invests in “high risk/high payoff” programs to tackle the biggest challenges in intelligence gathering and analysis. IARPA programs range from quantum computing and autonomous vehicles, to bioinformatics and neuroscience to machine detection of emerging technology. IARPA also sponsors prize challenges as a way to spur new ideas and projects.

IARPA Director Dr. Jason Matheny joins us to discuss some of the organization’s most exciting research projects, explains how IARPA approaches research investment, and tells us why software matters to the intelligence community.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
This event is co-produced by the Museum's Center for Software History, which collects, preserves, interprets, and presents to the world the history of software and its ongoing impact on global society.
Jul 7, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming for visitors of all ages, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jun 30, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits. On select Fridays, we'll be bringing you interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jun 23, 2017 6:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Easy to Learn, Hard to Master
Film Screening and Q&A with Filmmaker Bruno Grampa and Narrator Bil Herd
<i>Easy to Learn, Hard to Master</i>
Please join us for this special screening of Easy to Learn, Hard to Master, hosted by Friday Nights @CHM. The film follows the story of Atari and the dynamic team that charted the company’s course. After the screening, Executive Producer Bruno Grampa and Narrator Bil Herd will be available to take questions from the audience.
Atari has an impressive collection of “firsts”: it is responsible for producing the first coin-operated videogame, the first general-purpose console to win the market, and one of the first marriages between the videogame and movie industries. It was also the fastest-growing company in US history at its peak and contributed to a crash that reshaped the video game industry. Easy to Learn, Hard to Master follows the story of Atari and the dynamic team that charted the company’s course. Produced by The 8bit Generation Project, the film features interviews with Nolan Bushnell, Allan Alcorn, Warner VP Manny Gerard, and Former Atari CEO Ray Kassar.

The 8bit Generation Project is dedicated to research, collection, and presentation of history from the era of the 8-bit microprocessor, popular in machines from the early 1970s to the end of the 1980s.

Executive Producer Bruno Grampa and Narrator Bil Herd will join Museum CEO John Hollar for audience Q&A. Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy dinner at Off the Grid's street food market and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits are open from 5 to 9 p.m.
Jun 21, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Decoding Cancer
Cancer Genome Atlas Director Dr. Jean Claude Zenklusen in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Decoding Cancer
Not all cancers are created equal—sequences in a cancer cell’s genetic code can affect how quickly it spreads, how resistant it is to radiation, and how it turns a normal cell into a cancerous one. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) is focused on identifying, analyzing, and sharing these genetic traits. Ultimately, this information could help the medical community provide personalized treatments and more accurate diagnoses for patients.

Join us as TCGA Director Dr. Jean Claude Zenklusen discusses the role of genetics and technology in studying, treating, and preventing cancer.
Not all cancers are created equal—sequences in a cancer cell’s genetic code can affect how quickly it spreads, how resistant it is to radiation, and how it turns a normal cell into a cancerous one. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), a collaboration between the National Cancer Institute and the National Human Genome Research Institute, is focused on identifying, analyzing, and sharing these genetic traits. Ultimately, this information could help the medical community provide personalized treatments and more accurate diagnoses for patients.

As the largest-scale cancer genomics project to date, TCGA researchers have mapped key genomic changes in 33 different types of cancer, including 10 rare forms of the disease. The organization has also collected 2.5 petabytes of data describing tumor and normal tissues from more than 11,000 patients. This information is publicly available and has been used by thousands of researchers.

Join us as TCGA Director Dr. Jean Claude Zenklusen discusses the role of genetics and technology in studying, treating and preventing cancer.

Dr. Zenklusen was named director of TCGA in 2013. Prior to that, he served as the scientific program director of the Office of Cancer Genomics. He also cloned two novel tumor suppressor genes while participating in the Human Genome Project in 1996. He received his PhD in cancer biology and genetics from the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences in 1995.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Jun 20, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Putting Your Finger On It: Creating the iPhone
An Evening with Original iPhone Innovators & Engineers in Conversation with Museum Historian John Markoff
Putting Your Finger On It: Creating the iPhone
How did iPhone come to be? On June 20, four members of the original development team will discuss the secret Apple project, which in the past decade has remade the computer industry, changed the business landscape, and become a tool in the hands of more than a billion people around the world.

Scott Forstall, the leader of the original iPhone software team will take part in a fireside chat with Computer History Museum historian John Markoff. A panel with three of the engineers who worked on the original iPhone, Nitin Ganatra, Scott Herz, and Hugo Fiennes, will describe how the iPhone came to be.
During 2006, the year before the iPhone was introduced, it seemed that innovation in mobile devices was beginning to slip away from Silicon Valley. Wireless computing was advancing more quickly in Europe than it was in the United States. That all changed abruptly when Steve Jobs stepped onstage at Moscone Center in San Francisco and asserted he was introducing “three revolutionary products” in one package—the iPhone.

How did iPhone come to be? On June 20, four members of the original development team will discuss the secret Apple project, which in the past decade has remade the computer industry, changed the business landscape, and become a tool in the hands of more than a billion people around the world.

Part 1: Original iPhone Engineers Nitin Ganatra, Scott Herz, and Hugo Fiennes in Conversation with John Markoff

Part 2: Original iPhone Software Team Leader Scott Forstall in Conversation with John Markoff About iPhone 360
The iPhone 360 explores the story of iPhone, from its prehistory, inception, and launch, to its evolution and impact. Coinciding with the 10th anniversary year of the iPhone launch in 2007, iPhone 360 includes integrated initiatives across the Computer History Museum to create new collections of artifacts and oral histories, scholarly research and insights, dynamic events, and educational content and curriculum.

About the Exponential Center
This event is produced by CHM's Exponential Center. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Jun 17, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build - Father's Day Edition
Special Edition
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
This special event welcomes middle school students and their fathers to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. Students and their dads will learn with and from each other as they take on new challenges and gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators. This event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Please note that this event is for fathers and their students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 16, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits. On select Fridays, we'll be bringing you interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jun 15, 2017 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Photoshop Magic
A Lecture by Digital Artist & Author Bert Monroy
Photoshop Magic
Digital art pioneer and Photoshop Hall of Famer Bert Monroy will share how he came to see a computer as a tool for art. Hear him describe the digital paint techniques he has mastered throughout his career and highlight the famous faces in his largest piece to date Times Square, currently on display in our Make Software: Change the World! exhibition.
Digital artist Bert Monroy uses Adobe Illustrator as his pencil and Photoshop as his paint to create digital works of art. After 30 years as a commercial illustrator, he has mastered the technique of hyperrealism in his digital illustrations by perfecting reflections and shadows down to the very last pixel. Times Square, Monroy’s largest and most ambitious painting to date, contains more than 700,000 Photoshop layers and took four years to create.The masterpiece also contains hidden “Easter eggs” featuring famous faces and Monroy’s friends and family.

Monroy’s interest in computing was sparked by the Macintosh 128 in 1984. From early drawing programs such as MacPaint, Display (the first version of Photoshop), and Illustrator 1.1 to the current versions of Photoshop and Illustrator, he has utilized photo-imaging software throughout his career to transform his works into digital masterpieces, earning him a spot in the Photoshop Hall of Fame. Monroy has written and co-authored several books, including the first-ever book on Photoshop titled The Official Adobe Photoshop Handbook. Today, Monroy’s clients include Apple, Adobe, Pixar, and Disney Animation. He also teaches popular Photoshop courses Pixel Playground and Dreamscapes on Lynda.com and has a vast library of digital-painting tutorials.

Join us as Bert Monroy shares his story and perspective on the evolution of Photoshop as well as the digital techniques and tricks he uses to create art.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Jun 10, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Mechanical Engineer Camille Eddy
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 10, 2017 10:00 AM Education Series
Education Workshops
Design_Code_Build Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jun 9, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits. On select Fridays, we'll be bringing you interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jun 8, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Engineering Emotional Intelligence
Affectiva CEO Rana el Kaliouby in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
What could your computer or phone do if it knew how you were feeling? Through a combination of psychology, technology, and cognitive science, one startup is bringing emotional intelligence to the digital world. Affectiva has developed new artificial intelligence that allows machines to not only read your feelings, but also react to them.

Join us as Dr. Rana el Kaliouby, Affectiva CEO and co-founder, shares how the company’s technology was invented, the creative ways the software is being used, and her vision for the future of emotion-aware computing.
What could your computer or phone do if it knew how you were feeling? Through a combination of psychology, technology, and cognitive science, one startup is bringing emotional intelligence to the digital world. Affectiva has developed new artificial intelligence that allows machines to not only read your feelings, but also react to them. Spun out of the MIT Media Lab, the company has developed sophisticated face and emotion algorithms that can detect even the most nuanced expressions with a high degree of accuracy. This technology is trained and tested by incorporating information from Affectiva’s emotional data repository of 4.8 million faces from 75 different countries, amounting to more than 50 billion emotion data points.

Affectiva’s software is already in the hands of developers, content creators, market researchers, and advertisers, who are using it to learn more about how audiences react to products. Companies like Unilever, CBS, Kellogg, and Mars are current customers.

Join us as Dr. Rana el Kaliouby, Affectiva CEO and co-founder, shares how the company’s technology was invented, the creative ways the software is being used, and her vision for the future of emotion-aware computing. Prior to starting the company, Rana worked as a scientist at MIT, leading efforts to apply emotion-sensing technology to mental health and autism research. Rana is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. Rana holds a BSc and MSc in computer science from the American University in Cairo and a PhD from the computer laboratory at the University of Cambridge.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Jun 4, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins directly, crobbins@computerhistory.org.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 3, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 2, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum this summer.

From 5 to 9 p.m., Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with Off the Grid and our own Cloud Bistro to bring you the techiest block party in Silicon Valley. Enjoy seven food trucks, CHM exhibits with new extended hours, and live music. Grab your family, friends, and co-workers and unwind at our beer garden or relax near our fire pits. On select Fridays, we'll be bringing you interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Jun 1, 2017 8:15 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Forum on the Road
KQED Broadcasts Live from the Computer History Museum
Forum on the Road is back for a second series of live broadcasts across the Bay Area. During Forum's two-hour program at the Computer History Museum, KQED host Michael Krasny will discuss technology and issues facing Silicon Valley.
Forum on the Road is back for a second series of live broadcasts across the Bay Area. During Forum's two-hour program at the Computer History Museum, host Michael Krasny will discuss technology and issues facing Silicon Valley. Audience members will participate in these live programs and get a behind-the-scenes look at how the show is produced.

Krasny will spend one hour focusing on the spread of fake news with Google News founder Krishna Bharat and other guests. The next hour will be dedicated to discussing augmented reality and it's applications in Silicon Valley.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
May 19, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Big Data Gets Political
Stanford University’s Dr. Michal Kosinski in Conversation with Museum's Center for Software History David C. Brock
Big Data Gets Political
Liking your favorite musicians, restaurants, and travel destinations on Facebook may seem harmless. But each click may have played a crucial role in Donald Trump’s victory and the UK’s vote to leave the European Union.

Join us as Stanford University’s Dr. Michal Kosinski discusses how big data is being used in politics and what it could mean for the future of voting.
Liking your favorite musicians, restaurants, and travel destinations on Facebook may seem harmless. But each click may have played a crucial role in Donald Trump’s victory and the UK’s vote to leave the European Union.

Dr. Michal Kosinski turned studying Facebook likes into a science at Cambridge University’s Psychometrics Center. He and a fellow student developed a personality quiz application that encouraged users to opt into sharing their Facebook profiles. This allowed Kosinski to create a database that linked users’ Facebook likes with the personality traits they revealed by taking the quiz. In addition to discovering correlations between personality and the things users liked on Facebook, he was able to predict a user’s skin color, sexual orientation, political leanings, and even alcohol and drug use.

It didn’t take long before Kosinski’s work attracted the attention of the private sector—specifically, a big data firm that gave rise to Cambridge Analytica, the analytics company that worked with the Trump and LeaveEU campaigns. Kosinski, who had become increasingly uneasy as he started to consider the implications of his research, turned down the company’s offer to pay for access to his database. He soon learned that the company had created a copy of his data tool and was using it in the wild.

Dr. Michal Kosinski joins us to share his story—his work in psychometrics, how his big data tool works, the methods he warned against and finally, his vision for the future of data in politics and beyond.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy dinner at one of Off the Grid food trucks and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits will also be open from 5-8pm.
May 13, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Make Software Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
May 7, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build—Mother's Day Edition Featuring Broadcom's Melissa Lau
Special Edition
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
This special event welcomes middle school students and their mothers to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. Students and their moms will learn with and from each other as they take on new challenges and gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators. This event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Please note that this event is for mothers and their students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
May 4, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
From Screen Queen to Imaging Innovator
Openwater CEO Mary Lou Jepsen in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Mary Lou Jepsen has led Facebook’s virtual reality efforts, advised Google’s Sergey Brin, and invented $100 laptops. Now she is turning her consumer electronics experience to the task of curing disease. Jepsen's goal with her new company Openwater is to shrink today’s massive MRI machines into wearable devices that continuously scan the body.
Mary Lou Jepsen has led Facebook’s virtual reality efforts, advised Google’s Sergey Brin, and invented $100 laptops. Now she is turning her consumer electronics experience to the task of curing disease.

After decades of working in display divisions at some of Silicon Valley’s biggest companies, her goal is to shrink today’s massive MRI machines into wearable devices that continuously scan the body. Jepsen’s new company, Openwater, is developing technology that uses the way the body scatters infrared light to develop high-resolution images equal to those produced by an MRI. This is enabled by novel LCDs with pixels small enough to create holographic images, coupled with the use of body-temperature detectors and complex software. These LCDs are small and light enough that they could line a beanie or a bandage. The implications of a wearable body imaging system are significant for detecting and treating cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and even mental illnesses.

Join us as Mary Lou Jepsen discusses her Silicon Valley history, her company on the cutting edge of tech and medicine, and her vision for the future of body imaging and healthcare. Until mid-2016 she led advanced consumer electronics and virtual reality at Facebook and Oculus. Previously, she had a similar role at Google and Google X, where she was also a close advisor to Sergey Brin. She co-founded One Laptop per Child (OLPC) with Nicholas Negroponte, and was the lead inventor and architect of the $100 laptop. She holds a PhD in optical physics and an ScB in electrical engineering both from Brown University as well as an ScM in computational holography from the MIT Media Lab. She is an inventor on over 100 published or issued patents.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Apr 29, 2017 12:00 PM Education Event
Education Workshops
Cracking the Code Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Humans have been using code to share information for centuries. In this workshop, participants will discover different ways people have communicated over time, from Incan Quipu to Morse Code, uncover the motivations behind code writing, and explore how computers read and interpret code today.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is being held as a special event and is not open to the pubic.
Apr 23, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Apr 19, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Venture Capital in the Blood
Three Generations of Drapers in Silicon Valley
Join us with Draper Richard Kaplan Co-chair Bill Draper, DFJ and Draper Associates Founding Partner Tim Draper, and Halogen Ventures Founding Partner Jesse Draper in Conversation with Exponential Center’s Marguerite Gong Hancock.
The Draper family has played a defining role in Silicon Valley venture capital for four generations, spanning 60 years. Guiding entrepreneurs from idea to exit, Drapers have served as investors, mentors, match-makers, and allies to founders of Hotmail, Skype, Baidu, Apollo Computer, Tesla and more.

The Draper VC dynasty began in 1958. General William Draper founded Draper, Gaither & Anderson, one of the first professional venture capital firms on the west coast. His son Bill co-founded Draper & Johnson then Sutter Hill Ventures, before starting Draper International, a fund focused on venture investments in India, and Draper Richards, which invests in U.S. technology companies. Bill's son, Tim, cofounded Draper Fisher Jurvetson (DFJ) in 1985. DFJ has backed tech superstars like Baidu, Space X and Tumblr.. Tim’s daughter Jesse, also known as “The Valley Girl”, continues the Draper legacy today as the founder of Halogen Ventures, an early stage VC fund focused on female-founded consumer companies.

How did the Drapers catch--and pass on--the venture capital bug? What lessons have these investors learned from each other? What does the future of VC look like in Silicon Valley and around the world? Join us for stories and insights from three generations of Drapers.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Apr 8, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 26, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build - Mentors' Edition
Special Edition
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
This special event welcomes middle school students and their adult mentors to participate together. Students will work alongside their mentors to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. Students and their adult mentors will learn with and from each other as they take on new challenges and gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators. This event is suitable for participants who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8 and their adult mentors.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors. Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Mar 25, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Design_Code_Build Family Workshop
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Mar 24, 2017 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
I’m Sorry, Dave. I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That.
A Lecture by IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center's Grady Booch
IBM Fellow Grady Booch will explore how we take our dreams of computing machines that do the impossible and turn them into the possible, with a consideration for the limits we must overcome, from the laws of physics to the principles of design to the constraints of our very human ethical and moral frameworks.
“The limits of the possible,” said Arthur C. Clarke, “can only be defined by going beyond them into the impossible.” Our mythologies, our books, our movies have given voice to our dreams of computers that transcend human abilities; we do not lack for imagination of the impossible. In a sense, the history of computing can be seen through the lens of how our science and our engineering have yielded a continuous process of making the impossible possible. However, there are things we know we cannot do, there are some things we don’t yet know how to do, and there are some things we probably shouldn’t do.

This presentation is the next lecture in the documentary project Computing: The Human Experience. Here, we will explore how we take our dreams of computing machines that do the impossible and turn them into the possible, with a consideration for the limits we must overcome, from the laws of physics to the principles of design to the constraints of our very human ethical and moral frameworks.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Mar 12, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build - All Girls Edition
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, exploring the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies. Program instructors help participants to make personal connections with artifacts and stories from the Museum’s collection as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this all girls event is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 9, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Hunting for Space Treasure
Planetary Resources CEO Chris Lewicki in Conversation with John Hollar
Planetary Resources is developing technology that could enable humans to fly spacecraft to asteroids and mine minerals that could be worth millions of dollars. The company is backed by luminaries like Larry Page and Richard Branson and raised $21 million in May 2016.

Join us as CEO Chris Lewicki sits down with Museum CEO John Hollar.
Forget Silicon Valley: could outer space be the next place to make your fortune?

Planetary Resources is developing technology that could enable humans to fly spacecraft to asteroids and mine minerals that could be worth millions of dollars. The company is backed by luminaries like Larry Page and Richard Branson and raised $21 million in May.

As part of the technology, the company is working on to reach asteroids, it created an earth observation system called Ceres. This platform’s infrared and hyperspectral sensors far surpass the capability of human eyes. Through this technology, Ceres could enable more sophisticated tracking of climate change, crop growth, forest fires and many other environmental changes.

Chris Lewicki has been intimately involved with the lifecycle of NASA’s Mars Exploration Rovers and the Phoenix Mars Lander. He performed system engineering development and participated in assembly, test and launch operations for both Mars missions. He was Flight Director for the rovers Spirit and Opportunity, and the Surface Mission Manager for Phoenix. The recipient of two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals, Lewicki has an asteroid named in his honor: 13609 Lewicki. Chris holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Arizona.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Mar 5, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build - All Girls Edition
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this all girls event is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 2, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Computing in Your Pocket
The Prehistory of the iPhone in Silicon Valley
Join us for a fascinating panel discussion with moderator John Markoff, a Computer History Museum Historian, who reported on the era for the New York Times, Steve Capps, who led the development of the Newton while at Apple Computer; Donna Dubinsky, former president & CEO of Palm, Inc. and co-founder & former CEO of Handspring; Jerry Kaplan, founder of Go Corp.; and Marc Porat, co-founder and former chief executive of General Magic.
Two decades before Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone, a handful of engineers and designers began exploring the idea of handheld computers in Silicon Valley. In 1987, beginning with the then-secret Newton Project inside Apple and with a mobile pen-based computer at Go Corp., a range of handheld computing ideas began to bubble up all around the Valley. Before long, inside Apple there were prototypes like Swatch and Pen Mac, and the Pocket Crystal idea which would be spun out in 1990 as General Magic. Shortly afterwards, in 1992, Palm Computing was founded. The race was on to reinvent computing and make it even more personal.

Join us for a fascinating panel discussion with moderator John Markoff, a Computer History Museum Historian, who reported on the era for the New York Times, Steve Capps, who led the development of the Newton while at Apple Computer; Donna Dubinsky, former president & CEO of Palm, Inc. and co-founder & former CEO of Handspring; Jerry Kaplan, founder of Go Corp.; and Marc Porat, co-founder and former chief executive of General Magic.


This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory. This event is produced by CHM's Exponential Center. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Feb 26, 2017 12:00 PM Education Event
Education Workshops
Cracking the Code Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Humans have been using code to share information for centuries. In this workshop, participants will discover different ways people have communicated over time, from Incan Quipu to Morse Code, uncover the motivations behind code writing, and explore how computers read and interpret code today.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Feb 25, 2017 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes students in grades 6 through 8 to participate in one-day events that provide engaging hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, math) learning opportunities. Activities focus on problem-solving and innovation through the lens of computer science and computing history. Each event welcomes up to 100 students and features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry. Rock stars explores their personal and professional journeys and share insights that help to inspire students’ interest and curiosity. The program is supported by volunteers from the tech industry who act as role models and mentors, allowing students to meet and get to know real tech professionals.

Level 1 introduces concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students to practice communication skills and gain confidence to see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is suitable for students in grades 6 through 8.

There is a $15.00 non-refundable registration fee per student participating in the event. To inquire about financial assistance, please contact Cate Robbins.

Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Feb 17, 2017 Special Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Computer History Trivia Night!
Where can you have fun, play games, and grab amazing food on a Friday night? CHM! Friday Nights @CHM is hosting a computer history trivia night!

Bring your friends, family, co workers, or just bring yourself, and join us on Friday, February 17 for a trivia night all about computer history! The fun begins at 6 p.m., but come earlier and explore our exhibits to get a head start on the competition.
Where can you have fun, play games, and grab amazing food on a Friday night? CHM! Friday Nights @CHM is hosting a computer history trivia night!

Bring your friends, family, co workers, or just bring yourself, and join us on Friday, February 17 for a trivia night all about computer history! The fun begins at 6 p.m., but come earlier and explore our exhibits to get a head start on the competition. Museum hours are extended to 8 p.m. on Fridays. The Cloud Bistro will be open as well with snacks and drinks!

Join us for a fun evening of trivia and show off your computer history knowledge!
Feb 16, 2017 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Six Transformations of Hewlett-Packard
A Conversation with Becoming Hewlett Packard Authors Webb McKinney and Philip E. Meza
The Six Transformations of Hewlett-Packard
In startup history, Hewlett-Packard is the “granddaddy of them all." Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard developed business and management practices we see reflected in Silicon Valley companies today. However, after 77 years of history and seven CEOs, the HP of today looks completely different from the company it was in 1939. How has leadership at Hewlett-Packard enabled the company to transform itself throughout its history? And what can today’s founders learn from the company’s ability to evolve?
In startup history, Hewlett-Packard is the “granddaddy of them all”. Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard developed business and management practices we see reflected in Silicon Valley companies today. However, after 77 years of history and seven CEOs, the HP of today looks completely different from the company it was in 1939. How has leadership at Hewlett-Packard enabled the company to transform itself throughout its history? And what can today’s founders learn from the company’s ability to evolve?

Becoming Hewlett Packard: Why Strategic Leadership Matters tackles these questions by studying the contributions of each of HP’s CEOs, obtained through 15 years of primary research. Former HP executive Webb McKinney and strategy consultant Philip E. Meza join Museum Center for Software History Director, David Brock for a conversation about the role of leadership in shaping HP and what startups can learn from its history.

Webb McKinney began his career at HP when David Packard and Bill Hewlett ran the company. McKinney held numerous engineering management and executive positions at HP, running HP's entry into consumer PCs, and going on to lead its entire PC business. McKinney later led worldwide sales, marketing and supply chains for all of HP's commercial customers. Before retiring from HP in 2003, McKinney was the executive vice president responsible for HP's integration of Compaq. McKinney is currently a consultant in merger integration and leadership development.

Philip E. Meza is a strategy consultant and researcher. Much of his consulting work focuses on technology strategy and business development. A graduate of the University of California at Berkeley and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, Meza is the author of Coming Attractions: Hollywood, High Tech and the Future of Entertainment (2007) and co-author of Strategic Dynamics: Concepts and Cases (2006).

We are pleased to announce Books Inc. will be selling copies of Becoming Hewlett Packard: Why Strategic Leadership Matters before and after the program.
Feb 12, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Make Software Family Workshop
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jan 28, 2017 10:00 AM Speaker Series
New Exhibition
Make Software: Change the World! Public Opening
We’re celebrating software with the opening of our new major exhibition, Make Software: Change the World!
Computers help us design safer cars, diagnose disease, and battle Orcs. They manage our business by day and entertain us at night. Smartphones can hail a cab, send a text, or play a tune. All thanks to software. Software enables computers, tablets, even appliances to touch and transform nearly every aspect of daily life. Our devices brim with extraordinary potential. Software unlocks that potential.

We’re celebrating software with the opening of our new major exhibition, Make Software: Change the World!

Make Software explores the history, impact, and technology behind seven software applications that have transformed our lives, including MRI, MP3, Car Crash Simulation, Texting, Wikipedia, Photoshop, and World of Warcraft. It presents new ways of thinking about software, uncovering its storied past and its current impact all the while encouraging viewers to imagine a world where almost anything is possible because of software. Make Software comprises 6,000 square feet of interactive exhibition space, anchored by a software lab that enables visitors of all ages to understand software and the concepts of programming through multimedia interactive stations.

Click here for more information about Make Software: Change the World!
Jan 27, 2017 10:00 AM Speaker Series
New Exhibition
Make Software: Change the World! Members-Only Exhibition Preview and Reception
CHM members are invited to join us for an exclusive preview of the Museum's new major exhibition, Make Software: Change the World!
Computers help us design safer cars, diagnose disease, and battle Orcs. They manage our business by day and entertain us at night. Smartphones can hail a cab, send a text, or play a tune. All thanks to software. Software enables computers, tablets, even appliances to touch and transform nearly every aspect of daily life. Our devices brim with extraordinary potential. Software unlocks that potential.

We’re celebrating software with the opening of our new major exhibition, Make Software: Change the World!

Make Software explores the history, impact, and technology behind seven software applications that have transformed our lives, including MRI, MP3, Car Crash Simulation, Texting, Wikipedia, Photoshop, and World of Warcraft. It presents new ways of thinking about software, uncovering its storied past and its current impact all the while encouraging viewers to imagine a world where almost anything is possible because of software. Make Software comprises 6,000 square feet of interactive exhibition space, anchored by a software lab that enables visitors of all ages to understand software and the concepts of programming through multimedia interactive stations.

Click here for more information about Make Software: Change the World!
Jan 22, 2017 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Make Software Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, participants will explore the history and impact of software, use Raspberry Pi technology to complete a project, and learn how the instructions they give computers can make things happen in the real world.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jan 17, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
How the World Builds Software
GitHub CEO Chris Wanstrath in Conversation with Fortune Senior Writer Michal Lev-Ram
Join us as GitHub CEO and Co-founder Chris Wanstrath sits down with Fortune Senior Writer Michal Lev-Ram to discuss the fascinating story of GitHub’s growth, the most amazing pieces of software built on the platform, and his vision for the future of coding education.
Launched in 2008, social-coding site GitHub supports over 15 million users who use the online platform to collaborate, build, and store software. Appealing to organizations with a large base of software developers, including Google, NASA, and even the White House, GitHub taps into the growing enthusiasm for open source projects and currently houses the world’s largest collection of public software. The site’s popularity among its user community has also attracted attention and dollars from major investors, including Sequoia Capital and Andreessen Horowitz. Last year, the company raised $250 million, valuing it at more than $2 billion.

GitHub CEO Chris Wanstrath, who was named to Fortune's 40 Under 40 in 2015, likens the medium to Facebook but for programmers. “You log in, you’re connected to people, but instead of seeing photos of their baby, you see their code,” he says.

Join us as GitHub CEO and Co-founder Chris Wanstrath discusses the fascinating story of GitHub’s growth, the most amazing pieces of software built on the platform, and his vision for coding education. Wanstrath sits down with Fortune Senior Writer Michal Lev-Ram, who covers technology for both Fortune magazine and its website. She is also co-chair of Fortune's Brainstorm Tech conference and Most Powerful Women Next Gen event. Her outstanding reporting contributed to Fortune winning a SABEW Best in Business Award for its technology coverage in 2012.

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2016 Events

Dec 7, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Preservation Game
Saving Bletchley Park Author Sue Black in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Join us as Sue Black discusses her book, her life and career, and the campaign that saved Bletchley Park.
The destruction of cultural heritage sites cannot always be avoided, but for every instance of nature devastating a historical landmark there are easily as many cases where mankind knowingly and willfully destroys its own history in the name of progress, profit, or real estate. Losses like that can be averted, and often are thanks to the efforts of historically-minded individuals that galvanize populations and decision makers into rethinking plans for redevelopment of landmarks. In those cases, there’s usually a good story to go along with it.

That’s the case with Sue Black and Bletchley Park. Black, a single mother of three, began taking math courses while living in a women’s refuge. Those classes led to an undergraduate degree from South Bank University and, eventually, a PhD from the same institution. After becoming a Senior Research Associate at University College London, Black organized a web and social media campaign, making exceptional use of Twitter and Facebook, to preserve Bletchley Park, the headquarters for British decryption programs during World War II. Her book, Saving Bletchley Park, details the preservation initiative and was the fastest crowdfunded book of all time.

Join us as Sue Black discusses her book, her life and career, and the campaign that saved Bletchley Park.
We are very pleased that Books, Inc. will be selling copies of Saving Bletchley Parkbefore and after the program.
Dec 4, 2016 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Cracking the Code Family Workshop
The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.
Humans have been using code to share information for centuries. In this workshop, participants will discover different ways people have communicated over time, from Incan Quipu to Morse Code, uncover the motivations behind code writing, and explore how computers read and interpret code today.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Nov 18, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Working on ENIAC
Rethinking the Myths of Innovation with ENIAC in Action author Thomas Haigh
Join us as Thomas Haigh discusses his new book and the men and, in particular, women involved in the creation of design of the ENIAC.
Books and shows about the history of information technology have usually focused on great inventors and technical breakthroughs, from Charles Babbage and Alan Turing to Steve Jobs and the World Wide Web. Work by non-geniuses, particularly operations work, has been written out of the popular history of innovation, but without it no computer would be useful. Information historian Thomas Haigh is writing it back in.

This talk will focus on ENIAC, the first general purpose electronic computer, based on research for his book ENIAC in Action: Making and Remaking the Modern Computer, recently published by MIT Press. Haigh’s book explains that the six women now celebrated as the “first computer programmers” were actually hired as computer operators and worked hands-on with the machine around the clock. Other women, who actually built ENIAC, have been forgotten entirely, as have the contributions of other people working on vital aspects of the project, from procuring the right kind of wire to saving ENIAC from flood water. Haigh’s concluding comments relate this historical material to the human labor and physical infrastructure today vanishing from public view into the “cloud.”

Join us as Thomas Haigh discusses his new book and the men and, in particular, women involved in the creation of design of the ENIAC.
We are very pleased that Books, Inc. will be selling copies of ENIAC in Action before and after the program.
Nov 18, 2016 5:00 PM Special Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is hosting a Star Wars night!
Join the CHM team on Friday, November 18 to bring fun back to the Silicon Valley Galaxy.
Join the CHM team on Friday, November 18 to bring fun back to the Silicon Valley Galaxy.

Bring your light sabers and learn the basics to defend yourself against dark forces. Dress up as your favorite Star Wars character and get 10% off at the CHM Store (Star Wars items available). Participate in our Star Wars character costume contest. Refuel your engines by enjoying themed drinks at Mos Eisley Cantina (a.k.a. the Cloud Bistro. Think you know the Star Wars universe? Explore earthly locations where scenes of the famed movies were filmed with Liquid Galaxy and take photos at our photo station and share them on social media!

Enjoy these themed activities in addition to our regularly scheduled Friday Nights @CHM activities:
-Feast on cuisine from food trucks, coordinated by Off the Grid
-Explore the Museum exhibits until 9pm!
-Purchase general admission tickets at 50% off!
-Enjoy a variety of drinks from the Cloud Bistro

Whether you are on the dark side or support the rebel alliance, Star Wars night at CHM is sure to be a good time! All humans, droids, and creatures welcomed.
Nov 16, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Next Billion
Kiva Executive Chairman Julie Hanna in Conversation with Exponentials' Marguerite Gong Hancock
Join us for a fascinating fireside chat between technologist, serial entrepreneur, and advisor Julie Hanna with Exponential's Marguerite Gong Hancock.
The great advances in the world have often aggravated the inequities in the world. The least needy see the most improvement, and the most needy see the least--in particular the billion people who live on less than a dollar a day.Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft and philanthropist


Among Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, talk of the next billion often conjures up visions of creating the next “unicorn” company, with private valuation that tops $1 billion. Technology innovation and economic valuation often go hand in hand. But what of social impact?
A growing number of innovators and entrepreneurs are focused on the next billion people who are digitally excluded, many of whom live in extreme poverty, globally and locally. For example, since its first loan to a fishmonger in Uganda, Kiva, the world's largest crowdlending marketplace for underserved entrepreneurs, has allowed people to lend money via the Internet to underserved entrepreneurs. Kiva has crowdfunded more than one million loans to more than 2.1 million entrepreneurs in 82 countries, totaling nearly $1 billion dollars with a repayment rate over 97 percent.

How are entrepreneurs changing the lives of the next billion, one by one? How is technology being used as a force for democratization of access and opportunity? Where are hot spots around the world for entrepreneurship and what can Silicon Valley learn from them? What are some positive roles for government? Is there a way to dismantle the false choice between purpose and profit?

Join us for a fascinating fireside chat between Julie Hanna, Kiva executive chairman and Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship, with Exponential’s Marguerite Gong Hancock.
This Exponential Center event is part of Global Entrepreneurship Week, the world’s largest celebration of the innovators and job creators who launch startups that bring ideas to life, drive economic growth and expand human welfare. During one week each November, thousands of events in 160 countries inspire millions to engage in entrepreneurial activity while connecting them to potential collaborators, mentors and even investors. Powered by the Kauffman Foundation, the initiative is supported by dozens of world leaders and a network of more than 15,000 partner organizations. GEW is held November 14-20, 2016.
Nov 12, 2016 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Workshops
Design_Code_Build Family Workshop
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.
This workshop explores the engineering design process by analyzing modern and historical technologies and innovations. Participants will investigate important moments in computing history, reflect on changes in human-computer relationships, and explore various methods of input and output. Using Raspberry Pi technology, participants will collaborate on a project highlighting ways in which we can use technology to solve problems.

The Computer History Museum’s workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Nov 6, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Airbnb's Vibha Bamba
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Nov 5, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Mentors' Special Edition Featuring Miss CEO Founder Nita Singh Kaushal
Level 1: Introductory
This special event welcomes mentors and their middle school-aged mentees to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Mentor pairs will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology...
Mentor pairs and groups supported by organizations throughout the Bay Area are invited to participate in a special Design_Code_Build event!

This special event welcomes mentors and their middle school-aged mentees to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Mentor pairs will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to "program" each other through a life-sized maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. The event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.

This Design_Code_Build program is a one-day event filled with hands-on experiences that provide opportunities for mentors and students to learn with and from each other and become inspired as they share ideas. Students will also see engineering, science, technology and math as exciting adventures that they can participate in. The event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who will share the knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion gained through their personal journey.

Please note that this event is for students in grades 6 through 8 and their adult mentors. Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Oct 26, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Exponential Center and NextGen Advisory Board
Day of the Dead: Postmortems of Silicon Valley Failures
In Conversation with Twitch's Justin Kan, CrowdSmart's Kim Polese, and Garage Technology Ventures' Bill Reichert
Day of the Dead
Join us as Silicon Valley veterans Justin Kan, co-founder of Twitch, Kim Polese, chairman of ClearStreet, and Bill Reichert, managing director of Garage Technology Ventures, share postmortems of their industry successes and failures.
The most famous startup stories often have storybook endings: founders hatch daring and disruptive ideas, secure funding by venture capitalists, create billion dollar companies, and change the world. But for every big success, there are many more tech companies that fail.

Silicon Valley is unique in its toleration--and even celebration--of failure. Failure is not a badge of honor for its own sake, but an acceptable cost on the way to success: “Fail fast. Succeed Faster.”

Even entrepreneurs known for being winners go through failures of many stripes--fizzles, flops, false steps, even frauds. Some are permanent; others are hard-won lessons on the way to the next big thing.

What can we learn from some epic (and more quiet) failures? What differentiates between productive failure and fatal failure? What signs should entrepreneurs heed to declare a failed product, service, or start-up dead? In dark times, what are effective strategies to re-boot? How do the best failures yield valuable lessons and spawn something new?

Justin Kan is an internet entrepreneur and partner at seed fund Y Combinator. Justin has founded many companies including: Kiko, the first AJAX web calendar; Justin.tv, a live video streaming platform; Socialcam, a mobile video sharing app (acquired for $60mm by Autodesk in 2012); Twitch, a video game streaming platform (acquired by for $970mm by Amazon in 2014); and Exec, an on demand maid service (acquired by Handybook in 2014).

Kim Polese is a technology entrepreneur and business leader. She currently serves as Chairman of CrowdSmart, a collective intelligence platform that accelerates startup traction and funding and helps investors identify promising startups. Kim is also Chairman of ClearStreet, whose employer-sponsored financial wellness platform makes healthcare more affordable and helps people build longterm financial health.

Kim has an established history of working on ground-breaking technologies. She began her career at IntelliCorp helping Fortune 100 companies use AI expert systems, and later moved into product management at Sun Microsystems where she led the launch of Java in 1995. Kim then co-founded Internet software pioneer Marimba, serving as President, CEO and Chairman and leading the company to profitability, an IPO and a successful acquisition by BMC.


Bill Reichert is Managing Director of Garage Technology Ventures. Since 1998, Bill and Garage have helped many great companies get their start, including Pandora Media, LeftHand Networks, Kaboodle, WhiteHat Security, Tripwire, and D.light Design. Prior to co-founding Garage, Bill was a co-founder or senior executive in several venture-backed technology startups, including Trademark Software, The Learning Company, and Academic Systems.

Join us as Silicon Valley veterans Justin Kan, co-founder of Twitch, Kim Polese, Chairman of CrowdSmart, and Bill Reichert, managing director of Garage Technology Ventures, share postmortems of their industry successes and failures.

Oct 21, 2016 Special Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Celebrate Halloween at CHM!
What is Halloween without a scary movie? On October 21, Friday Nights @CHM is taking over the Museum and celebrating scary movies and the technology behind them! Enjoy scary movie-themed trivia, explore haunted locations around the world, and venture into the unknown to discover CHM with a scavenger hunt.

Dress up in your costume to receive 10 percent off at the CHM Store! Seasonal drinks will be offered by Cloud Bistro.

Cheers to scary movies, computers, and Halloween!
What is Halloween without a scary movie? On October 21, Friday Nights @CHM is taking over the Museum and celebrating Halloween with scary movies and the technology behind them!


• Grab your favorite treats from Off the Grid food trucks
• Enjoy scary movie-themed trivia
• Dress up in a costume and receive 10% off in the CHM Store
• Explore haunted places around the world with Google Galaxy
• Discover CHM with a scavenger hunt
• Enjoy seasonal drinks available for purchase in the Cloud Bistro


Cheers to scary movies, computers, and Halloween!


Oct 16, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Oct 15, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8. Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Oct 1, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Planet's Matthew Ferraro
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Sep 25, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Quip's Brina Lee
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Sep 24, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Credit Karma's David Reiman
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Sep 22, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Pioneers of the Possible: Women Entrepreneurs on Innovation and Impact
Heidi Roizen and Michelle Zatlyn in Conversation with Exponential Center's Marguerite Gong Hancock
Pioneers of the Possible
Pioneers of the Possible: Women Entrepreneurs on Innovation and Impact Heidi Roizen and Michelle Zatlyn in conversation with Marguerite Gong Hancock.
Silicon Valley is home to pioneers of the possible. From Bill Hewlett and David Packard to Mark Zuckerberg, history, media, and pop culture frequently showcase the stories of Silicon Valley’s male founders. What about women?

While tech companies and venture capitalists today are starting to actively support rising female stars, women entrepreneurs often are unheralded. During the past two years, female founders raising Series A capital jumped from 10 percent to 14 percent in 2015, but they are still too rare. What can we learn from successful women entrepreneurs who have forged their own paths for innovation and impact?

Heidi Roizen is a venture capitalist, Stanford lecturer, and “recovering entrepreneur.” In 1983 she co-founded software company T/Maker and served as CEO for over a dozen years until its acquisition. After a year as VP of Worldwide Developer Relations at Apple, she became a venture capitalist, and is now the operating partner at DFJ. She serves on the the board of directors for DMGT, ICIX, Intematix, ShareThis, and Zoox and lectures at Stanford on entrepreneurship.

Michelle Zatlyn is co-founder and head of user experience for CloudFlare, a web performance and security company selected by the Wall Street Journal as the "Most Innovative Internet Technology Company" for two successive years and member of the unicorn club, with a private valuation of more than $1 billion. Zatlyn has been named "Young Global Leader" by the World Economic Forum and "40 Under 40” leaders by the San Francisco Business Times.

Join us as these remarkable women founders sit down with Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to share their entrepreneurial journeys.
Sep 21, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
A Tale of Deleted Cities
A Conversation with GeoCities Co-founder David Bohnett | Introduction by
A Tale of Deleted Cities
Join us as GeoCities co-founder David Bohnett sits down with Museum CEO John Hollar to share the story of the web-hosting site from its founding to its preservation. The program will include a brief introduction from artist Richard Vijgen.
Before Facebook and Myspace, GeoCities housed the web’s largest online community. Started in 1994 as Beverly Hills Internet, the site’s tens of millions of "homesteaders" created personal pages in theme-based neighborhoods of their choice. Those neighborhoods started out as webcams in real places in Los Angeles—one in the gay mecca of West Hollywood, another in Beverly Hills for high-end shopping. But when GeoCities invited users to add their own pages on those themes, a virtual land rush began. After a spectacular IPO, GeoCities was bought by Yahoo! in 1999 for over $3 billion.

Yahoo! eventually decided GeoCities was obsolete. All 38 million pages of the main English-language site were to be erased in October 2009 until hacker preservationists from The Internet Archive, Archive Team, and other volunteers stepped in. To showcase the tens of millions of pages they preserved, artist Richard Vijgen created an interactive visualization of the 650-gigabyte backup of GeoCities, titled "Deleted City," now on display at the Computer History Museum.

Join us as GeoCities co-founder David Bohnett sits down with Museum CEO John Hollar to share the story of the social media and web-hosting site from its founding to its preservation. The program will include a brief introduction from artist Richard Vijgen.
Artist Richard Vijgen will be available to answer questions near the Deleted City exhibit located in the Museum lobby.
Sep 9, 2016 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Screens
Silicon Cowboys, hosted by Friday Nights @CHM
Please join us for this special screening of Silicon Cowboys, hosted by Friday Nights @CHM. After the screening, film director Jason Cohen will be available to take questions from the audience.
Launched in 1981 by three friends in a Houston diner, Compaq Computer set out to build a portable PC to take on IBM, the world’s most powerful technology company. Many companies had tried cloning the industry leader’s code, only to be trounced by IBM and its high-priced lawyers. Silicon Cowboys explores the remarkable David versus Goliath story, and eventual demise, of Compaq, an unlikely upstart who altered the future of computing and helped shape the world as we know it today.

Directed by Academy Award®-nominated director Jason Cohen, the film offers an insider's look into the explosive rise of the 1980's PC industry and is a refreshing alternative to the familiar narratives of Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg.

“This is a well-told piece of history—a David versus Goliath story that pits Compaq against IBM — that can be enjoyed by tech types and the rest of us, too." —San Francisco Chronicle

“A lively look at an underexposed tech-biz success story.” —The Hollywood Reporter

Silicon Cowboys offers a vivid and evocative portrait” and is “by turns amusing and illuminating.” —Variety

Please join us for this special screening of Silicon Cowboys, hosted by Friday Nights @CHM. After the screening, film director Jason Cohen will be available to take questions from the audience.
Aug 17, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Cleanrooms and Dirty Water: The Environmental Legacy of Silicon Valley
Cleanrooms and Dirty Water: The Environmental Legacy of Silicon Valley
Silicon Valley, the world’s most dynamic center of digital innovation, has more EPA Superfund sites than any other region in the United States. In this talk, Christophe Lécuyer, professor of the history of science and technology at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris, reconstructs the chemical handling and disposal practices of semiconductor firms that left behind this environmental legacy and were the source of high illness rates among Silicon Valley workers.
Silicon Valley, the world’s most dynamic center of digital innovation, has more Superfund sites than any other region in the United States. In this talk, Christophe Lécuyer, professor of the history of science and technology at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris, reconstructs the chemical handling and disposal practices of semiconductor firms that caused this environmental debacle and were the source of high illness rates among Silicon Valley workers.

Lecuyer also investigates the controversies that brought the region’s health and water contamination crises to light in the late 1970s and first half of the 1980s. These controversies were initiated by radical labor activists interested in unionizing Silicon Valley. In order to mobilize workers and build community support for the organizing of the semiconductor industry, they attacked corporate negligence regarding employee safety and health and the storage of toxic chemicals. Their campaign led to a revolution in safety in Silicon Valley and large-scale environmental remediation efforts supervised by the Federal government.

Join us at the Computer History Museum as Professor Christophe Lécuyer investigates the environmental history of Silicon Valley.
Aug 7, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring NASA's Anima Patil-Sabale
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Aug 7, 2016 10:00 AM Education Series
CHM Summer Workshops
Cracking the Code Family Workshop
Humans have been using codes to communicate and share information for centuries. In this workshop, participants will uncover the motivations behind code-writing, and explore how code is used by computers today.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Humans have been using codes to communicate and share information for centuries. In this workshop, participants will uncover the motivations behind code-writing, and explore how code is used by computers today.

The Computer History Museum’s Summer Workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Aug 6, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Educators' Edition Featuring LightUp's Josh Chan
Level 1: Introductory
Design_Code_Build for Educators combines elements of both the introductory and intermediate student programs, helping K12 classroom teachers and community educators explore concepts of computer programming, work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, and discover meaningful strategies for incorporating computer science and computer history into cross-curricular learning environments.
Design_Code_Build for Educators combines elements of both the introductory and intermediate student programs, helping K12 classroom teachers and community educators explore concepts of computer programming, work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, and discover meaningful strategies for incorporating computer science and computer history into cross-curricular learning environments. Educators will benefit as they gain experience and discuss how to create a framework of support that can enhance student learning.

The Design_Code_Build program welcomes educators from around the Bay Area to a one-day event that will provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and explore the intersection of history and engineering, science, technology, and math. The event will feature a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who will share his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. The rock stars will explore their personal journey and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest.

This program is appropriate for educators who work with students in all grades from K through 12.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Aug 2, 2016 10:00 AM Education Series
CHM Summer Workshops
Make Software Workshop for Children Entering Grades 3-5
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, students will explore the myriad impacts of software and investigate ways that they too can be makers of software. Students will use Raspberry Pi computers, learning about ways they can create software, while completing a group project.
Software allows computers to touch nearly every aspect of our daily lives. In this workshop, students will explore the myriad impacts of software and investigate ways that they too can be makers of software. Students will use Raspberry Pi computers, learning about ways they can create software, while completing a group project.

The Computer History Museum’s Summer Workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This is a public workshop, and is open to students in elementary school. No previous knowledge or experience is required. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jul 23, 2016 10:00 AM Education Series
CHM Summer Workshops
Design_Code_Build Family Workshop
The Design_Code_Build workshop explores how our relationship with computers has changed as input/output methods have evolved over time. This workshop will highlight historical methods of input/output and explore modern methods of input/output through physical computing using Raspberry Pi technology.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
The Design_Code_Build workshop explores how our relationship with computers has changed as input/output methods have evolved over time. This workshop will highlight historical methods of input/output and explore modern methods of input/output through physical computing using Raspberry Pi technology.

The Computer History Museum’s Summer Workshops explore the ongoing impact of computer history in our world. Through hands-on activities that emphasize collaboration and problem-solving, participants develop a deeper understanding of the history of technology and its role in shaping our present and future.

This workshop is open to children ages 7 and up accompanied by at least one adult. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required.
Jul 10, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Google's Patrick Clary
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jul 9, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring YouTube's Stephanie Leung
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jul 7, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
How to Spy on 600 Million People: Hidden Vulnerabilities in Chinese IT
How to Spy on 600 Million People
The rise of Input Method Editors (IMEs) in China has had a profound impact on Chinese computing, making it today perhaps the fastest text input languages on earth due to its heavy reliance on predictive text, autocompletion, shortcuts, and abbreviations. At the same time, the rise of IMEs carries with it a profound security vulnerability that no one has discussed before.

Join us as Professor Thomas Mullaney goes behind the scenes of Chinese IT to reveal the security vulnerabilities of IMEs.
The rise of Input Method Editors (IMEs) in China has had a profound impact on Chinese computing, making it today perhaps the fastest text input languages on earth due to its heavy reliance on predictive text, autocompletion, shortcuts, and abbreviations. At the same time, the rise of IMEs carries with it a profound security vulnerability that no one has discussed before.

Drawing on over a decade of research into the history of Chinese information technology in the modern age, Professor Thomas Mullaney addresses a hidden security vulnerability in Chinese IT that enables the surveillance of all Chinese computer users by the state or private interests—even when using seemingly "offline" or "private" programs like Microsoft Word, NotePad, TextEdit, and more. At a time when many of us have become wary of state surveillance over private communications—phone calls, text messages, and emails—this talk alerts us to ways in which it has become possible, in theory if not in practice, to spy upon any and all text input.

Join us as Professor Mullaney goes behind the scenes of Chinese IT to reveal the security vulnerabilities of IMEs.
Jun 18, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Father's Day Special Edition, Featuring Google's Arda Akman
Level 1: Introductory
This special event welcomes fathers to join their middle school-aged children in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. The event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. As families learn with and from each other, students will see their parents as life-long learners; parents will have opportunities to explore, create, and learn alongside and from their students; and everyone will gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators.
This special event welcomes fathers to join their middle school-aged children in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. The event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. As families learn with and from each other, students will see their parents as life-long learners; parents will have opportunities to explore, create, and learn alongside and from their students; and everyone will gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators.

The Design_Code_Build student program welcomes middle schoolers from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Please note that this event is for fathers with students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 5, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Planet Labs' Patrick Yeon
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 4, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring NASA's Ali Guarneros Luna
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jun 3, 2016 11:30 AM Special Events
Exponential Center: 1 to 1 Billion
Creating Exponential Impact in Silicon Valley
Pioneers John Doerr, Mike Lee, Regis McKenna, Jay Last, and Gordon Moore
One idea, combined with the entrepreneurial spirit of founders, venture capitalists, influencers, and changemakers, can create a billion devices, generate a billion dollars, or touch a billion people. The exponential power of innovation combined with entrepreneurship surrounds us: one set of Fairchild notebooks catalyzed the creation of semiconductor chips that power billions of devices; one business plan turned into Apple, a $500 billion company that...
One idea, combined with the entrepreneurial spirit of founders, venture capitalists, influencers, and changemakers, can create a billion devices, generate a billion dollars, or touch a billion people. The exponential power of innovation combined with entrepreneurship surrounds us: one set of Fairchild notebooks catalyzed the creation of semiconductor chips that power billions of devices; one business plan turned into Apple, a $500 billion company that has sold more than one billion devices; one person’s quest to lose weight created a community that has made a mark on the $55 billion digital health market.

How did the stars of these exponential stories fare in the face of risk and reward? How do pioneering entrepreneurs develop their vision? What are the roles of hard work and luck? How do innovators collaborate with Valley venture investors and other experts to navigate uncharted waters? What difficult decisions yield the greatest impact?

Join us for three panel discussions to celebrate the launch of the Computer History Museum’s Exponential Center, an exciting new center focused on innovation and entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley and around the world. These conversations provide a window into Silicon Valley from pioneers at crucial junctures―the birth of Fairchild, Intel and the semiconductor industry in the 1960s, the shaping of Apple’s and Intel’s first products in the 1980s, and the recent rise of digital health.

Session I
Fairchild Semiconductor Co-founder Jay Last joins the Museum’s Center for Software History Director David Brock to discuss the birth and rise of silicon technology, with video commentary from Fairchild and Intel Co-founder Gordon Moore.

Session II
Marketing trailblazer Regis McKenna teams with Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to discuss the evolution of tech innovation and marketing, from Apple and Intel to today’s big data environment.

Session III
Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers (KPCB) Chair John Doerr leads a conversation with MyFitnessPal Co-founders Mike Lee and Albert Lee about the dynamic between entrepreneur and investor through periods of growth and change.

This event is a part of the Computer History Museum's new center on entrepreneurship and innovation, the Exponential Center. The Exponential Center at the Computer History Museum is capturing the legacy—and advancing the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact. The center’s work focuses on five integrated initiatives: collections and exhibitions, research and insights, education, events, and thought leadership.
May 14, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build with Rock Star Alvaro Prieto
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
May 7, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Mother's Day Special Edition Featuring Google's Katherine Kuan
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build student program welcomes middle schoolers from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
This special event welcomes mothers to join their middle school-aged children in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Families will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” each other through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. The event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. As families learn with and from each other, students will see their parents as life-long learners; parents will have opportunities to explore, create, and learn alongside and from their students; and everyone will gain confidence as active, capable problem-solvers and innovators.

The Design_Code_Build student program welcomes middle schoolers from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Please note that this event is for mothers with students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Apr 29, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The History (and the Future) of Software
A Lecture by IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center's Grady Booch
Computing hardware resides in the physical world: we can see these artifacts, touch them, move them, study them. The software that brings life to that hardware lives in an ethereal world, largely hidden from observation. And yet, the story of software is just as compelling as that of hardware: both worlds are filled with stories of ambition, invention, creativity, vision, avarice, and serendipity. Just as we can identify clear eras in the evolution of computing hardware, so too can we name the epochs of software.
Computing hardware resides in the physical world: we can see these artifacts, touch them, move them, study them. The software that brings life to that hardware lives in an ethereal world, largely hidden from observation. And yet, the story of software is just as compelling as that of hardware: both worlds are filled with stories of ambition, invention, creativity, vision, avarice, and serendipity. Just as we can identify clear eras in the evolution of computing hardware, so too can we name the epochs of software.

In this lecture, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center's Grady Booch will take audiences on a journey that explores the evolution of software, from the time when computers were human to the present, where we live in a veritable sea of software. Along the way, Booch will look at historically interesting examples of software and study the evolution of the process and the tools of software development. Even now, the nature of software and software development is under rapid transformation, so Booch will conclude with some observations about the future of software.
Apr 26, 2016 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Alibaba and Jack Ma: Beyond E-commerce and China—Implications for Silicon Valley
Author Duncan Clark in Conversation with the Museum’s Marguerite Gong Hancock
Alibaba and Jack Ma: Beyond E-commerce and China—Implications for Silicon Valley
Alibaba: The House That Jack Ma Built is a story of how one entrepreneur, Jack Ma, used his charisma, ambition, and unrelenting determination to build a company that surprised the world. Today the dominant player in China’s e-commerce market, the company is testing the limits of the private sector’s potential to reshape the country’s economy. At the same time, Alibaba’s $25 billion IPO was the largest global IPO in history, and it is extending its reach around the world through e-commerce, finance, entertainment, and beyond. What are the implications for China and for Silicon Valley?

We bring together Marguerite Gong Hancock of the Computer History Museum with Duncan Clark, the author of the new book that digs deep into the remarkable journey of Jack Ma.
Alibaba: The House That Jack Ma Built, by Duncan Clark, is the story of an entrepreneur whose remarkable charisma, ambition, and unrelenting determination helped build a company that surprised the world.

In just a decade and a half, Jack Ma, a man from modest beginnings who started out as an English teacher, built Alibaba into one of the world’s largest companies, rivaling Walmart and Amazon. In 2014 Alibaba’s $25 billion IPO was the largest global IPO in history. A Rockefeller of his time who is courted by CEOs and presidents around the world, Ma is an icon for China’s booming private sector and the gatekeeper to hundreds of millions of middle-class consumers.

Alibaba is a story of East vs. West. How did an upstart company in China take on the giants of Silicon Valley, ultimately joining their ranks to become one of the world’s most successful Internet businesses? Alibaba is also a story of North vs. South. As Beijing government leaders attempt to wean the country off the old economic model of manufacturing and exports, do entrepreneurs far from the northern seat of government power, like Jack Ma, hold the keys to a consumer-led future in new frontiers, from finance to entertainment and beyond?

Marguerite Gong Hancock, executive director of the Exponential Center, the Museum’s new center for entrepreneurship and innovation and co-founder and former director of China 2.0 at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, hosted Jack Ma twice as a keynote speaker in the Valley. Marguerite will engage in a dynamic conversation with Duncan Clark on Jack Ma and Alibaba, the leader and the company that symbolize China’s current economic transformation. Duncan Clark first met Jack in 1999 in the small apartment where Jack founded Alibaba. Granted unprecedented access to a wealth of new material, including exclusive interviews, Clark draws on his own experience as an early adviser to Alibaba as well as his two decades in China chronicling the Internet’s impact on the country. Please join us.

“Anybody who thinks the Chinese just copy or steal technology from the West should read this book and think again. Jack Ma is part Bill Gates, part Steve Jobs, part Larry Page, part Sergei Brin, and part Mark Zuckerberg all rolled into one.”

—Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO of WPP

“...This book is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the present China and the heartbeat of a great entrepreneur.”

—Tim Draper, Founder of Draper Associates, DFJ, and Draper University

“Useful, business-minded reporting on an unconventional corporate magnate, containing both corporate and human-interest perspectives.”

—Kirkus Books Inc. will be on-site selling copies of Alibaba: The House That Jack Ma Built before and after the program. A book signing with author Duncan Clark will immediately follow the program.
Apr 21, 2016 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Technological Indian
Author Ross Bassett in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
The rise of India as a technological and engineering force, and the parallel rise of Indian engineers and executives to the pinnacle of the industry, is a success story played out over 150 years of history. At the heart of that story is a fascinating relationship between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a higher education infrastructure in India that spurred the growth of the Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT), modeled after MIT. In his new book The Technological Indian (2016, Harvard University Press), Professor Ross Bassett traces that international history, drawing on a unique database of every Indian to graduate from MIT between its founding and 2000.
The rise of India as a technological and engineering force, and the parallel rise of Indian engineers and executives to the pinnacle of the industry, is a success story played out over 150 years of history. At the heart of that story is a fascinating relationship between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a higher education infrastructure in India that spurred the growth of the Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT), modeled after MIT. In his new book The Technological Indian (2016, Harvard University Press), Professor Ross Bassett traces that international history, drawing on a unique database of every Indian to graduate from MIT between its founding and 2000. Bassett will chart this group’s ascent to the top levels of high-tech professions around the world in an engaging talk based on research conducted for his new book.

As a group of Indians sought a way forward for their country, they saw a future in technology. Bassett examines the tensions and surprising congruencies between this technological vision and Mahatma Gandhi’s nonindustrial modernity. The book shows how India’s first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, sought to use MIT-trained engineers to build an India where the government controlled technology for the benefit of the people. In the private sector, Indian business families sent their sons to MIT, while MIT graduates established India’s information technology industry.

By the 1960s, IIT students were drawn to the United States for graduate training and many of them stayed, becoming prominent industrialists, academics, and entrepreneurs. The MIT-educated Indian engineer became an integral part of a global system of technology-based capitalism. Yet, as Bassett shows, many focused less on India and its problems—a generation of technological Indians created without the regard for a technological India originally envisioned by the founders.

Please join us for a fascinating discussion with The Technological Indian author Ross Bassett and Museum CEO John Hollar.
Apr 16, 2016 6:00 PM Fellow Awards
CHM Presents
2016 Fellow Awards
Honoring the Past. Inspriring the Future.
Fellow Awards
The Fellow Awards is a signature program of the Computer History Museum. Since 1987, CHM’s Fellow Awards have honored distinguished technology leaders who have forever changed our world. This prestigious honor recognizes each Fellow’s role in the advancement of computing history, as well as the impact of their contributions. CHM is proud to highlight and preserve the stories of each Fellow to promote technology as a conduit for change and inspire future generations.
Their creativity, passion, and ingenuity have changed the world. They are the legends who have made computing historic.

Please join us for Silicon Valley’s biggest night as technology leaders, innovators, and visionaries around the world gather to celebrate the remarkable contributions of the Computer History Museum’s 2016 Fellow Award honorees.

This year’s honorees are:

David Cutler, for his fundamental contributions to computer architecture, compilers, operating systems, and software engineering.

Lee Felsenstein, for his influence on the technical and social environment of the early personal computing era.

Philip Moorby, for his invention and promotion of the Verilog hardware description language.

The Fellow Awards is a signature program of the Computer History Museum. Since 1987, CHM’s Fellow Awards have honored distinguished technology leaders who have forever changed our world. This prestigious honor recognizes each Fellow’s role in the advancement of computing history, as well as the impact of their contributions. CHM is proud to highlight and preserve the stories of each Fellow to promote technology as a conduit for change and inspire future generations.
The Fellow Awards is an invite-only event. For more information, please e-mail Carina Sweet, csweet@computerhistory.org.
Apr 10, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Apr 9, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Verily Life Sciences' Vicky Demas
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-sized maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 30, 2016 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Screens
Growing the 8 Bit Generation
The documentary Growing the 8 Bit Generation, produced by the 8bit Generation Project, focuses on the Commodore 64’s role in the home computer explosion and the personal computer revolution. The movie features never-before-seen interviews with Jack and Leonard Tramiel, Chuck Peddle, Al Charpentier, Bil Herd, Michael Tomczyk, Dave Rolfe, Richard Garriot, Jeff Minter, and Andy Finkel, as well as Steve Wozniak, Nigel Searle, John Grant, Nolan Bushnell, Al Alcorn, and Joe Decuir.
The documentary Growing the 8 Bit Generation, produced by the 8bit Generation Project, focuses on the Commodore 64’s role in the home computer explosion and the personal computer revolution. The movie features never-before-seen interviews with Jack and Leonard Tramiel, Chuck Peddle, Al Charpentier, Bil Herd, Michael Tomczyk, Dave Rolfe, Richard Garriot, Jeff Minter, and Andy Finkel, as well as Steve Wozniak, Nigel Searle, John Grant, Nolan Bushnell, Al Alcorn, and Joe Decuir.

The 8bit Generation Project is a labor of love and takes its name from the 8-bit microprocessor popular in machines from the early 1970s to the end of the 1980s. The 8-bit generation was characterized by young entrepreneurs, engineers, visionaries, dreamers, and geniuses who wanted to change their lives and ended up changing the world.

Executive Producer Bruno Grampa will join Museum CEO John Hollar for a fireside chat and audience Q&A.
Mar 13, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Autodesk's Tatjana Dzambazova (Special Event for Girls Only)
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.

Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 6, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring SRI International's Yasmina Chitti
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 5, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build (Special Event for Girls Only)
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-sized maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Mar 4, 2016 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Just ∫du It:
How Mathematica, Wolfram|Alpha & the Wolfram Language Came to Be
Forty years ago Stephen Wolfram was a kid who wanted to study physics but didn't like doing math, so he started building software to do math. The result was the creation of Mathematica, which has enabled countless inventions and discoveries for over a quarter of a century and has helped educate generations of technical students. Stephen Wolfram used Mathematica to explore the computational universe of...
Forty years ago Stephen Wolfram was a kid who wanted to study physics but didn't like doing math, so he started building software to do math. The result was the creation of Mathematica, which has enabled countless inventions and discoveries for over a quarter of a century and has helped educate generations of technical students. Stephen Wolfram used Mathematica to explore the computational universe of programs and build a major new direction in basic science. This, in turn, led him to create Wolfram|Alpha, which now provides computational knowledge for millions of people, phones, etc. Stephen Wolfram has had the rare experience of continuously building a stack of technology for more than 30 years, leading now to the recently released Wolfram Language. Stephen Wolfram's work has often been informed by his interest in the history of computers and computational thinking.

This talk will provide a unique first-person view of the evolution of Stephen Wolfram's work and thinking, as well as his interactions with many greats from science and technology.
Feb 23, 2016 7:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Originals Author Adam Grant in Conversation with Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg
<i>Originals</i> Author Adam Grant in Conversation with Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg
The New York Times bestselling author of Give and Take examines how people can champion new ideas—and how leaders can encourage originality in their organizations.
Originals is one of the most important and captivating books I have ever read, full of surprising and powerful ideas. It will not only change the way you see the world; it might just change the way you live your life. And it could very well inspire you to change your world.
Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook and #1 New York Times bestselling author of Lean In


The New York Times bestselling author of Give and Take examines how people can champion new ideas—and how leaders can encourage originality in their organizations.

With Give and Take, Adam Grant not only introduced a landmark new paradigm for success but also established himself as one of his generation’s most compelling and provocative thought leaders. In Originals he again addresses the challenge of improving the world, but now from the perspective of becoming original: choosing to champion novel ideas and values that go against the grain, battle conformity, and buck outdated traditions. How can we originate new ideas, policies, and practices without risking it all?

Using surprising studies and stories spanning business, politics, sports, and entertainment, Grant explores how to recognize a good idea, speak up without getting silenced, build a coalition of allies, choose the right time to act, and manage fear and doubt; how parents and teachers can nurture originality in children; and how leaders can fight groupthink to build cultures that welcome dissent. Learn from an entrepreneur who pitches his start-ups by highlighting the reasons not to invest, a woman at Apple who challenged Steve Jobs from three levels below, an analyst who overturned the rule of secrecy at the CIA, a billionaire financial wizard who fires employees for failing to criticize him, and a TV executive who didn’t even work in comedy but saved Seinfeld from the cutting-room floor. The payoff is a set of groundbreaking insights about rejecting conformity and improving the status quo.

Sheryl Sandberg returns to our stage to moderate what is certain to be a thought provoking, insightful and engaging conversation with Adam Grant. We hope you will join us.

We are very pleased that Books, Inc. will be selling copies of Originals before and after the program.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on site recording this program for broadcast on Thursday, March 3,at 8 p.m.
Feb 21, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build (February 21st)
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Feb 20, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build with Rock Star Mark Castruita of Broadcom
Level 1: Introductory Level
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 event introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-sized maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.


Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.


Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Feb 13, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Intermediate Level. Special event for girls only.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm,...
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.

Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Jan 19, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Thinking Big—Ada Lovelace: Mathematician and Visionary
As part of the Computer History Museum’s (CHM) bicentennial celebration of Ada Lovelace, please join us for an in-depth discussion to gain a deeper understanding of the mathematician and visionary Ada Lovelace. University of Oxford Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science Ursula Martin, Ada Lovelace biographer Dr. Betty Toole, and retired engineer and Charles Babbage expert Tim Robinson will critically explore the complexities of Ada Lovelace within the scope of each of their fields of expertise.
As part of the Computer History Museum’s (CHM) bicentennial celebration of Ada Lovelace, please join us for an in-depth discussion to gain a deeper understanding of the mathematician and visionary Ada Lovelace. University of Oxford Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science Ursula Martin, Ada Lovelace biographer Dr. Betty Toole, and retired engineer and Charles Babbage expert Tim Robinson will critically explore the complexities of Ada Lovelace within the scope of each of their fields of expertise. Topics will include Lovelace’s childhood and lifelong interest in a variety of fields and subjects, her mathematical contributions and their significance within the historical context of Victorian England, her partnership with Charles Babbage and their work together on the Analytical Engine, and her lasting legacy within computer science today.

Current research derived from the Bodleian Libraries’ archive of Lovelace papers will also be presented. This exceptional collection of primary sources, compiled by Lovelace’s mother Annabella Milbanke, provides an intimate glimpse into Lovelace’s remarkable life. Documentation from Lovelace’s childhood includes her governess’ early notes about Lovelace’s daily routine, school workbooks, and diary entries. Later correspondence comprises letters from Lovelace to her tutors, including Augustus De Morgan, Charles Babbage, and other well-known Victorian thinkers.
This event coincides with CHM’s newest exhibit, Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace (December 12, 2015–December 11, 2016). Drawing on the Lovelace papers held at the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries, CHM is the only location in the United States where you can discover these extraordinary papers.
Jan 14, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
An Evening with the U.S. Digital Service Team
An Evening with the U.S. Digital Service Team
Behind the scenes within the Obama Administration, the U.S. Digital Service (USDS) is quietly rethinking - and remaking - the way the federal government harnesses digital technology to serve the nation in the 21st Century. In this Revolutionaries evening, we will meet the brain trust behind this landmark initiative.
I want us to ask ourselves every day, how are we using technology to make a real difference in people’s lives. President Barack Obama


Behind the scenes within the Obama Administration, the U.S. Digital Service (USDS) is quietly rethinking—and remaking—the way the federal government harnesses digital technology to serve the nation in the 21st Century. In this Revolutionaries evening, we will meet the brain trust behind this landmark initiative.

USDS was created in 2014 by the White House and is housed within the Office of Management and Budget. It began as a small team of digital experts who were recruited to repair the HealthCare.gov website. That elite digital team now works in collaboration with other government agencies to make websites more consumer friendly, to identify and fix problems, and to help upgrade the government’s technology infrastructure. Along the way they are saving taxpayers a lot of money as well.

We have assembled a panel of USDS leaders for a conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar about the great work they’re doing to basically redefine the experience of government. They will talk about how they were recruited and why they continue to serve, and what’s so powerful about the idea of "giving back." In addition, they have a steep recruitment goal to hit to help build an ongoing pipeline of tech talent bound for the nation's capitol – and the response to their pitch has been overwhelming.

This is going to be an inspirational evening you won’t want to miss.

We are pleased that KQED Radio will be onsite recording this program for broadcast on Thursday, January 21 at 8pm, and again on Saturday, January 23 at 3pm.

We are very pleased that CSPAN will be recording this program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
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2015 Events

Dec 13, 2015 10:00 AM Special Events
Community Days @CHM
Adafest
Celebrate Computer Pioneer Ada Lovelace with a Day of Fun and Learning for All Ages
Adafest
Visit the Computer History Museum on Sunday, December 13 to celebrate the 200th birthday of Ada Lovelace. Lovelace was an English mathematician and remarkable thinker. Unlike most people of her era, she understood that computers could do much more than calculate numbers, and she predicted many of the ways in which we use technology today.
Visit the Computer History Museum (CHM) on Sunday, December 13 to celebrate the 200th birthday of Ada Lovelace. Lovelace was an English mathematician and remarkable thinker. Unlike most people of her era, she understood that computers could do much more than calculate numbers, and she predicted many of the ways in which we use technology today.

In connection with CHM’s newest exhibit Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace (December 12, 2015–December 11, 2016), Adafest is part of the Museum’s year-long Lovelace celebration and furthers our ongoing initiative to highlight and honor women in technology.

Join us to meet local artisans, uncover the sights and styles of Victorian England, and explore Ada’s life through storytelling, live demonstrations, and tours. We’ll even have a costume contest! The Museum will be open until 7:00 PM, with free admission after 4:00 PM. Museum members can enjoy a special morning reception and shop the store’s Semi-Annual Sale all day, with 25 percent off everything—just in time for the holidays! Museum admission is free from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m.*
Dec 12, 2015 Special Events
Exhibit Opening
Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace
The newest exhibit at the Computer History Museum
Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace
The newest exhibit at the Computer History Museum, Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace, celebrates the 200th birthday of English mathematician and visionary Ada Lovelace (1815–1852). Drawing on the Lovelace papers held at the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries, the Computer History Museum is the only other location in the world where you can discover these extraordinary papers.
The newest exhibit at the Computer History Museum, Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace, celebrates the 200th birthday of English mathematician and visionary Ada Lovelace (1815–1852). Drawing on the Lovelace papers held at the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries, the Computer History Museum is the only other location in the world where you can discover these extraordinary papers.

Ada, Countess of Lovelace, was a remarkable person who was charming, temperamental, inquisitive, and intelligent. Lovelace lived at a time when women couldn’t vote or attend university, but as a member of the upper class, her friends and teachers included some of the greatest thinkers of the time: Charles Babbage, Augustus De Morgan, Charles Dickens, Michael Faraday, and Mary Somerville.

Lovelace was the only legitimate daughter of the famous poet Lord Byron. Though her father abandoned her when she was only one month old, she remained fascinated by him all her life. Her overbearing mother, Annabella Milbanke, steered her away from the arts and towards mathematics and science, afraid Lovelace would develop what she perceived as her estranged husband’s “madness.”

Lovelace was a woman of fierce originality and intellectual interests. Her ideas went beyond those of pioneer Charles Babbage, who saw computers only as number manipulators, and focused on the creative possibilities and limitations of computers—the very issues we wrestle with today.
The Computer History Museum invites you to explore the world of Ada, Countess of Lovelace, through her own words and written in her own hand.
The exhibit will be on view December 12, 2015-December 11, 2016, during regular Museum hours.
Dec 10, 2015 6:00 PM Special Events
Private Event
Thinking Big with YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki & Computer Pioneer Ada Lovelace
Thinking Big with  Susan Wojcicki & Ada Lovelace
Join us for an exclusive evening with YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki in honor of the Museum’s newest exhibit Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace. As we celebrate the bicentennial birthday of English mathematician Ada Lovelace, we not only recognize her numerical prowess, but her imagination and inquisitiveness—her willingness to “think big.”
Join us for an exclusive evening with YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki in honor of the Museum’s newest exhibit Thinking Big: Ada, Countess of Lovelace. As we celebrate the bicentennial birthday of English mathematician Ada Lovelace, we not only recognize her numerical prowess, but her imagination and inquisitiveness—her willingness to “think big.”

In the spirit of Ada Lovelace and “thinking big,” Wojcicki will join Museum CEO John Hollar in a one on one conversation about her career, the role of women in technology today, the importance of encouraging young girls to pursue STEM-related careers, the future of computing, and her own thoughts about what it means to “think big.”

While Lovelace is perhaps best known for her close partnership with Charles Babbage and her significant 1843 paper “Sketch of the Analytical Engine Invented by Charles Babbage,” she was also a woman of fierce originality and intellectual interests. Her ideas about computers went beyond those of Babbage, who saw computers only as number manipulators. Instead, Lovelace envisioned the creative possibilities of computers—the very issues we grapple with today.

Susan Wojcicki, Google employee number 16 and the only woman CEO under the Alphabet umbrella, is the head of YouTube—the world’s most popular digital video platform used by a billion people across the globe to access information, share video, and shape culture. An early champion of online video, Wojcicki was instrumental in Google’s 2006 acquisition of YouTube. She now oversees YouTube’s content and business operations, engineering, and product development. Wojcicki has also been a major advocate for women in technology.
Invite-Only Event
Dec 9, 2015 6:00 PM Education Event
Computer History Museum and Embark Labs Present
Hour Of Code and Beyond!
Calling all K-8 educators: join us and learn how to keep the energy and excitement of Hour of Code going all year long. The goal of this session is to demystify some foundational concepts of computer science and coding while deepening your understanding of design and computational thinking, in order to create hands-on learning experiences in your classrooms. You will walk away with specific lessons and strategies you can begin using with students right away. You can get a sense of Embark Labs programs from these pictures and videos on our YouTube channel.
Calling all K-8 educators: join us and learn how to keep the energy and excitement of Hour of Code going all year long. The goal of this session is to demystify some foundational concepts of computer science and coding while deepening your understanding of design and computational thinking, in order to create hands-on learning experiences in your classrooms. You will walk away with specific lessons and strategies you can begin using with students right away. You can get a sense of Embark Labs programs from these pictures and videos on our YouTube channel. Light dinner will be provided.
Nov 16, 2015 5:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
The Father of Digital Logic
The Father of Digital Logic
Join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates an engaging conversation about the life and legacy of George Boole with three distinguished guests: Dr. Michael Murphy, president and chair of University College Cork; Nick Kent, founder and creative director of Oxford Film and Television; and Dr. Kieran Drain, CEO of the Tyndall National Institute.
"He was a brilliant thinker, the possessor of a truly original mind. His story is our story: the creation of one of the great intellectual pillars that support our modern world. It is the story of a remarkable man, beautifully told."

- Ian Stewart, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics, University of Warwick, England, and popular-science and science-fiction writer

George Boole was an English mathematician, philosopher, and logician. He specialized in differential equations and algebraic logic, and is now best known as the author of The Laws of Thought.

The huge impact of George Boole on technology today is explored in this stunning new film commissioned by University College Cork, where Boole was its first professor of mathematics. Narrated by Oscar-winning actor Jeremy Irons and produced by multi award-winning Oxford Film and Television, The Genius of George Boole assembles industry leaders and academics from across the globe to explore the life and impact of one of the world’s greatest unsung heroes. This 58-minute film shines new light on the life, work, and legacy of George Boole.

Join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates an engaging conversation, about the life and legacy of George Boole with three distinguished guests: Dr. Michael Murphy, President, University College Cork, Ireland; Ms. Virginia Teehan, Director of Cultural Projects, University College Cork & Commissioning Editor: The Genius of George Boole; and Dr. Kieran Drain, CEO of Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland.
The George Boole celebration is made possible in collaboration with University College Cork, Ireland.
Nov 14, 2015 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring Broadcom's Stephen Palm
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.

Nov 4, 2015 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Antikythera Mechanism: Decoding the World's First Computer
Join us as Tony Freeth presents the early research on the device as well as the remarkable progress of three Antikythera research pioneers—up to the point in 2005 when new scientific investigations were carried out at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. Tom Malzbender then takes up the story by describing a remarkable surface-imaging technique that he invented, which became one of the key tools for investigating the Antikythera Mechanism. He also describes Microfocus X-Ray Computed Tomography (X-Ray CT), which yields high-resolution 3D X-rays. Both techniques were crucial for understanding the Antikythera Mechanism. Tony Freeth returns to reveal the remarkable breakthroughs that came from this new data. The Antikythera Mechanism has emerged as an astronomical calculating machine of spectacular sophistication: one of the wonders of the ancient world and a key landmark in the history of computing.
In 1900 a party of Greek sponge divers chanced on an ancient wreck near the tiny island of Antikythera, between Crete and the Greek mainland. The first ever major underwater archaeology subsequently recovered a spectacular array of ancient Greek treasure. The divers also found a corroded lump, not considered at all important at the time. Then the lump split apart revealing some tiny bronze gearwheels—a shocking discovery for ancient Greece. It was the beginning of an extraordinary voyage of discovery over more than a hundred years as its hidden identity has been gradually decoded. Tony Freeth presents the early research on the device as well as the remarkable progress of three Antikythera research pioneers—up to the point in 2005 when new scientific investigations were carried out at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

Tom Malzbender then takes up the story by describing a remarkable surface-imaging technique that he invented, which became one of the key tools for investigating the Antikythera Mechanism. He also describes Microfocus X-Ray Computed Tomography (X-Ray CT), which yields high-resolution 3D X-rays. Both techniques were crucial for understanding the Antikythera Mechanism. Tony Freeth returns to reveal the remarkable breakthroughs that came from this new data. The Antikythera Mechanism has emerged as an astronomical calculating machine of spectacular sophistication: one of the wonders of the ancient world and a key landmark in the history of computing.
Oct 21, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
How We Got To Now Author Steven Johnson with the Museum's CEO John Hollar
How We Got To Now Author Steven Johnson with the Museum's CEO John Hollar
Join John Hollar as he moderates an engaging conversation with Johnson about everything from how innovation happens and the "hummingbird effect," to the story of two "time travelers" who are very well known to the Computer History Museum (Babbage and Lovelace).
Johnson is especially adept at dismantling the myths of technology creation that seem to distort our political and economic discourse. At various points in ‘How We Got to Now,’ he helps us see how innovation is almost never the result of a lone genius experiencing a sudden voila! moment; it’s a complex process involving a dizzying number of inputs, individuals, setbacks and (sometimes) accidents. Also, it’s hardly the exclusive domain of private-sector entrepreneurs. Important ideas are often driven by academics, governments and philanthropists. Author Jon Gertner
The New York Times' Sunday Book Review
December 26, 2014


We’re pleased to welcome New York Times-bestselling author Steven Johnson to the Museum on the occasion of How We Got To Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World's release in paperback.

Exploring networks of creativity and the "long-zoom" approach to history, Johnson delves into six key areas – glass, cold, sound, clean, time, light – to show how multiple unexpected inventions in each led to the modern life we experience today. Filled with surprising stories of accidental genius and brilliant mistakes, the book investigates the secret history behind the everyday objects of contemporary life.

Join John Hollar as he moderates an engaging conversation with Johnson about everything from how innovation happens and the "hummingbird effect," to the story of two "time travelers" who are very well known to the Computer History Museum (Babbage and Lovelace).

This event includes a book signing immediately following the program. We are pleased that Books, Inc. of Mountain View will be on-site selling copies of How We Got To Now before and after the program.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Oct 17, 2015 9:30 AM Speaker Series
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build All Girls Edition!
Featuring Nitro's Jenn Tran
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a "rock star" - a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.
Sep 27, 2015 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring IBM's Rudy J. Wojtecki
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.

Sep 26, 2015 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents:
Educator Edition Design_Code_Build Featuring Google's Sargun Kaur
Educators! Join us on September 26th for a very special Educator edition of Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build led by the Computer History Museum (DCB)!
Educators! Join us on September 26th for a very special Educator edition of Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build led by the Computer History Museum (DCB)!

This interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) program is a free, one-day event, designed to help educators develop a deeper understanding of computer programming and engineering-minded problem solving. Educators will gain confidence while exploring these topics, allowing them to better support all students as they help them to develop an interest in computer science and other technology-related studies and careers. Inspired educators inspire students!

The DCB program is designed for a middle school age audience, and this Educator edition will be a unique opportunity for educators to experience the day just as our students do! We will explore the concepts of computer programming and coding through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning. Participants will gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi computer, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigating historic methods of computer programming. The event is keynoted by a “Rock Star” – a tech industry luminary who will share his or her personal story and passion.

All classroom teachers and community educators are invited to participate in this program.
Sep 24, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Revolutionaries
MIT's Cynthia Breazeal and Microsoft Research's Eric Horvitz with the BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones
MIT's Cynthia Breazeal and Microsoft Research's Eric Horvitz with the BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones
This Revolutionaries evening not only features two of the world's foremost experts in artificial intelligence, but also opens what we hope will be a new co-production partnership with the BBC World Service, which reaches 190 million listeners per week around the globe.
The final frontier of robotics is actually the human environment and robots need to be social in order to engage with us in a natural way, to be part of our lives.Cynthia Breazeal
ReadWrite, August 2014


My own view is that AI will be incredibly empowering to humanity. It will help solve problems, it will help us do better science, it promises to really help with challenges in education, health care and hunger….I’m very optimistic about machine intelligence, and I see a need for studying and guiding its influences on people and society, and for continuing dialogue with the public.Eric Horvitz
AAAS Science Insider, January, 2015


Artificial Intelligence is remaking our world. In a special edition of Revolutionaries, two of the field’s world-leading figures join the BBC’s Rory Cellan Jones to discuss how.

This Revolutionaries evening not only features two of the world's foremost experts in artificial intelligence, but also opens what we hope will be a new co-production partnership with the BBC World Service, which reaches 210 million listeners per week around the globe.

Returning to our stage is Dr. Eric Horvitz, Distinguished Scientist and Managing Director of Microsoft Research. Dr. Horvitz made a landmark gift to Stanford in December 2014 to fund a century-long study of the effects of artificial intelligence on society: the Stanford 100 Year Study of AI, or AI100. He has been working in the field of AI for more than two decades, and his interests include the computational foundations of intelligence – how do our minds work? - as well as the ways that human and machine intelligence might complement one another.

Joining Dr. Horvitz will be Dr. Cynthia Breazeal, founder and Chief Scientist of the social robotics firm Jibo, and Associate Professor of Media Arts & Sciences at MIT's Media Lab. At MIT she founded and directs the Personal Robots Group. Dr. Breazeal, a pioneer and leader in social robotics, was inspired at an early age by Star Wars, R2D2 and C3PO. She has been quoted as saying that "if R2D2 and an iPad had a baby, it'd be Jibo." In addition to learning more about her work at MIT, we'll inquire about her vision for Jibo and about the company's highly successful crowdfunding campaign - $2.2 million in pre-orders in four hours. Jibo received an additional $25 million funding round from a group of venture investors, and now employs more than 20 people in the Boston area.

These two distinguished guests will discuss a wide range of AI topics, beginning with their backgrounds, education and career paths, and their own projects. We'll then expand the discussion to explore the possible perils of machine "superintelligence" and the huge potential both of our guests see for machines to enhance our lives and to positively impact humanity.

Rory Cellan-Jones, the BBC's Technology Correspondent, will travel from London to moderate.

Because this is a co-production with the BBC World Service, this program will run longer than usual. In addition, the format will be a little different from a traditional CHM evening. More details will be provided to the audience prior to the program's start.

The Museum thanks the Carsten-Ellis Foundation for its support, which helps to make the Computer History Museum’s contribution to this edition of Revolutionaries possible.

KQED Radio will broadcast this program on Thursday, October 8 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

The BBC World Service delivers news content around the world in English and 28 other language services, on radio, TV and digital, reaching a weekly audience of 210 million. As part of BBC World Service, BBC Learning English teaches English to global audiences. For more information, visit bbc.com/worldservice. The BBC attracts a weekly global news audience of 283 million people to its international news services including BBC World Service, BBC World News television channel and bbc.com/news.
Sep 22, 2015 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
SuperBetter Author Jane McGonigal in Conversation with NPR's Laura Sydell
SuperBetter Author Jane McGonigal in Conversation with NPR's Laura Sydell
Jane McGonigal first graced our stage as a Revolutionary in 2011, on her bestselling Reality is Broken book tour, in conversation with NPR’s Laura Sydell. Join us as we welcome the return of McGonigal and Sydell for another enlightening and inspirational conversation about the ways we can harness the power of games to improve our lives.
SUPERBETTER: A Revolutionary Approach to Getting Stronger, Happier, Braver and More Resilient - Powered by the Science of Games

In 2009, game designer and author Jane McGonigal suffered a severe concussion that wouldn’t heal. Unable to think clearly, or work, or even get out of bed, she became anxious and depressed, even suicidal—a common symptom for concussion sufferers. But rather than let herself sink further, she decided to get better by doing what she does best: she turned her recovery process into a game. What started as a simple motivational exercise became a set of rules she shared on her blog. These rules became a digital game, then an online portal and a major research study with the National Institutes of Health. Today more than 400,000 people have played SuperBetter to get happier and healthier.

Jane McGonigal first graced our stage as a Revolutionary in 2011, on her bestselling Reality is Broken book tour, in conversation with NPR’s Laura Sydell. Join us as we welcome the return of McGonigal and Sydell for another enlightening and inspirational conversation about the ways we can harness the power of games to improve our lives.

There will be a book signing immediately following the program’s end. We are pleased that Books, Inc. of Mountain View, will be on-site selling copies of SuperBetter before and after the program.

We are pleased that KQED Radio will be recording this program for broadcast on Wednesday, November 25 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Sep 17, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Medium's Evan Williams & Steven Levy in Conversation with the Museum's John Hollar
Medium's Evan Williams & Steven Levy in Conversation with John Hollar
John Hollar, a former journalist himself, will sit down for an in-depth conversation with Medium's CEO Evan Williams, and the editor-in-chief of its tech hub Backchannel, Steven Levy. Medium was launched in 2012 as a beautiful platform for writers. Levy joined its ranks in 2014 after a distinguished career at WIRED Magazine, among other traditional publishing outlets, because of the opportunity to work with Williams, and to create quality content. Why are over 25 million people visiting Medium monthly and why is that not the only metric Medium uses to measure its success? Medium uses the term 'platishing' to describe this form of journalism – an amalgam of "publishing" and "platform." What is 'platishing,' and how will it influence the future of journalism?
The written word is the most accessible yet powerful form of media there is.Evan Williams
Wired, April 2015


One of the things that I love about Medium is its commitment to experimentation, one that I fully embrace. So a precise description of what this new venture [Backchannel] is going to eventually become is gleefully elusive. But I can tell you this – it will feature not only my own best writing but the work of contributors who share my belief in deeply reported, colorfully rendered stories in and around the tech explosion.Steven Levy
Medium, June 2014


Tonight we continue our Re/New: The Future of News track, a series of conversations with news leaders and innovators about how technology is disrupting the news and journalism industries – from gathering to disseminating, to audience behavior and participation as well.

John Hollar, a former journalist himself, will sit down for an in-depth conversation with Medium's CEO Evan Williams, and the editor-in-chief of its tech hub Backchannel, Steven Levy. Medium was launched in 2012 as a beautiful platform for writers. Levy joined its ranks in 2014 after a distinguished career at Wired Magazine, among other traditional publishing outlets, because of the opportunity to work with Williams, and to create quality content. Why are over 25 million people visiting Medium monthly and why is that not the only metric Medium uses to measure its success? Medium uses the term 'platishing' to describe this form of journalism – an amalgam of "publishing" and "platform." What is 'platishing,' and how will it influence the future of journalism?

Join us tonight to learn the answers to these and so many other questions about Williams' and Levy's vision for Medium and Backchannel, and how they view this "hybrid" company’s place within the ranks of other news and media companies.

We are pleased that KQED Radio will be recording this program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Aug 27, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Machines of Loving Grace Author John Markoff in Conversation with the Museum's John Hollar
Machines of Loving Grace Author John Markoff in Conversation with the Museum's John Hollar
Markoff, who was the first reporter to describe the World Wide Web, travels across the country, from the brain trusts in Palo Alto and Silicon Valley to the expanding tech corridor between Boston—home of MIT—and New York, the latest incubator for future tech development, and evaluates the present state of the A.I. versus I.A. debate. He goes deep inside the science fiction worlds of Battlestar Galactica, Terminator, and the Jetsons, which are fast becoming a reality, and talks to the insiders—scientists, entrepreneurs, ethicists, hackers and others—who are shaping the future. The result is an incisive and chilling look at our lives today—and what may come tomorrow.
As robots are increasingly integrated into modern society—on the battlefield and the road, in business, education, and health—those who design the machines have a stark choice to make. They can design systems to enhance the quality of human work and life-or they can design systems that replace humans entirely. Both approaches will reshape the modern world. In MACHINES OF LOVING GRACE: The Quest for Common Ground Between Humans and Robots, Pulitzer-Prize-winning New York Times reporter John Markoff, explores this issue and searches for an answer to one of the most important questions of our age: will these robots help us . . . or will they replace us?

Markoff, who was the first reporter to describe the World Wide Web, travels across the country, from the brain trusts in Palo Alto and Silicon Valley to the expanding tech corridor between Boston—home of MIT—and New York, the latest incubator for future tech development, and evaluates the present state of the A.I. versus I.A. debate. He goes deep inside the science fiction worlds of Battlestar Galactica, Terminator, and the Jetsons, which are fast becoming a reality, and talks to the insiders—scientists, entrepreneurs, ethicists, hackers and others—who are shaping the future. The result is an incisive and chilling look at our lives today—and what may come tomorrow.

Museum CEO John Hollar will moderate a captivating conversation with John Markoff on the evolution of our relationship with robots and the profound changes the future might hold. Please join us.

Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of John Markoff's book before and after the program.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be recording the program for broadcast on Wednesday, September 2 at 8pm.

And, finally, CSPAN's Book TV will be onsite recording this program for future broadcast.
Aug 9, 2015 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring SRI International's Jeff Klaben
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.
Aug 3, 2015 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
If the Computer Fits, Wear it!
Wearable pioneers Thad Starner and Greg Priest-Dorman in conversation with Museum’s Internet History Program Founder Marc Weber
Pioneers have experimented with wearing computers for half a century. Yet aside from a few specialized applications like fitness trackers, our bodies remain largely free of the smart tech that fills our pockets and purses.
Pioneers have experimented with wearing computers for half a century. Yet aside from specialized applications like fitness trackers and certain industrial uses, our bodies remain largely free of the smart tech that fills our pockets and purses.

Why? Besides larger questions around how wearable computing might fit into our everyday lives, the technology wasn't ready. Early devices were too bulky, hot, isolated, or hard to use to be consumer products. But that may be changing.

Thad Starner, Greg Priest-Dorman and Daniel Siewiorek are major pioneers of wearable computing. But while Dan was developing multiple generations of wearables for industrial and military use, Thad and Greg were focused on a more elusive goal – consumer wearables that could be part worn in daily life. They were both hired as early members of the Google Glass team. They also practice what they preach; both men have been wearing computers daily since the early 1990s.

The traveling exhibit we are hosting this summer, On You: A Story of Wearable Computing, shows consumer, professional, and home-made devices. Curated at Georgia Tech by Starner and design researcher Clint Zeagler, the exhibit explores the four key technical hurdles to making a consumer wearable computer: power and heat, networking, mobile input, and displays. Have they been solved?

Come find out on August 3, and learn more the technology that yearns to be on you!

On You: A Story of Wearable Computing is on display at the Computer History Museum from June 30th to September 20.
Bring a bag lunch and enjoy the discussion with CHM family and friends. Beverages and light snacks will be provided on behalf of the Museum.
Jul 25, 2015 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring Google's Anupam Pathak
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.
Jul 10, 2015 9:30 AM Speaker Series
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring Georgia Tech's Thad Starner
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and working with Museum docents to investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.
Jun 30, 2015 10:00 AM Special Events
New Exhibit Opening
On You: A Story of Wearable Computing
A traveling exhibit by Georgia Institute of Technology
Join us for the opening of On You: A Story of Wearable Computing on display at the Computer History Museum from June 30th to September 20.
Pioneers have experimented with wearing computers for half a century. Yet aside from a few specialized apps like fitness trackers, our bodies remain largely free of the smart tech that fills our pockets and purses.

Why? Besides huge questions around how wearable computing might fit into our social and everyday lives, the technology wasn't ready. Early devices were too bulky, hot, isolated, or hard to use.

Displaying consumer, professional, and home-made devices, On You explores the four key technical hurdles to making a consumer wearable computer: power and heat, networking, mobile input, and displays. Have they been solved? Come find out, and discover the technology that yearns to be on you!

Join us for the opening of On You: A Story of Wearable Computing on display at the Computer History Museum from June 30th to September 20.

This exhibit is created by Georgia Institute of Technology.
Jun 27, 2015 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring Tesla's Celine Geiger
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events led by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and working with Museum docents to investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.

Jun 19, 2015 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Towards the Third Age of Computing
Towards the Third Age of Computing
Explore the origins of computational thinking and the rise of computer science as a discipline in this fascinating lecture by theoretical physicist Tony Hey.
Explore the origins of computational thinking and the rise of computer science as a discipline in this fascinating lecture by theoretical physicist Tony Hey. As outlined in his new book with Gyuri Pápay, Hey will begin by paying homage to the early pioneering work on computer hardware and programming in the US and the UK, starting with logic gates and rapidly moving on to the microprocessor and Moore’s Law. Next, on the software side, Hey will give a brief survey of algorithms, beginning with Euclid’s algorithm for the Greatest Common Divisor and continuing via the Traveling Salesman to PageRank, the billion-dollar algorithm that launched tech giant Google. After a quick look at the achievements of Xerox PARC and the Alto “time machine,” Hey will offer a short summary of the origins of the personal computer, followed by an overview of the Internet and the web. Lastly, Hey will take a look at the resurgence of artificial intelligence and machine learning, before concluding with Butler Lampson’s vision for a “third age of computing.”

After the lecture, Hey will be joined on stage by Museum CEO John Hollar for a special Q&A session. A book signing of The Computing Universe: A Journey through a Revolution will take place immediately following the program.
Bring a bag lunch and enjoy the discussion with CHM family and friends. Lunch will be made available for purchase in the Museum café. Beverages and light snacks will be provided on behalf of the Museum.
May 28, 2015 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Community and Computing: The Arduino Experience
Community and Computing
This lecture by Massimo Banzi, co-founder of the Arduino project, will cover the historical origins of Arduino, including discussion of the process of designing tools which make digital technology accessible to people who are not experts, and the essential role of the larger Arduino ecosystem that supports this remarkable computer platform. Come see how a simple idea turned into a global phenomenon.
Now a decade old, the Arduino computer platform has captivated hundreds of thousands of hobbyists, artists, and experimenters around the world. This credit card-sized computer powers projects as diverse as digital mosquito killers, wearable tech, flame-throwing jack-o’-lanterns, and Twitter-enabled coffee pots. Infinitely versatile, Arduino can be found in the bedrooms of middle school students as well as the research laboratories of Fortune 500 companies.

Arduino is both a computer and a community. People of all ages have taken to Arduino in a mass movement to understand computing technology while having fun and exploring new ideas, especially ones that involve interaction with the world around us. Arduino is about exploring electronics as a creative medium.

This lecture by Massimo Banzi, co-founder of the Arduino project, will cover the historical origins of Arduino, including discussion of the process of designing tools which make digital technology accessible to people who are not experts, and the essential role of the larger Arduino ecosystem that supports this remarkable computer platform. Come see how a simple idea turned into a global phenomenon.
Bring a bag lunch and enjoy the discussion with CHM family and friends. Lunch is available for purchase in the Museum café. Beverages and light snacks will be provided on behalf of the Museum.
May 13, 2015 10:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Secrets of the Antikythera Mechanism
Secrets of the Antikythera Mechanism
In 1900, sponge divers off the coast of the tiny Greek island of Antikythera made an astonishing discovery: the wreck of an ancient Roman ship lay 200 feet beneath the water, its dazzling cargo spread out over the ocean floor. Among the life-size statues and amphorae was an encrusted piece of metal, which after nearly a century of investigation, is finally revealing its secrets....
In 1900, sponge divers off the coast of the tiny Greek island of Antikythera made an astonishing discovery: the wreck of an ancient Roman ship lay 200 feet beneath the water, its dazzling cargo spread out over the ocean floor. Among the life-size statues and amphorae was an encrusted piece of metal, which after nearly a century of investigation, is finally revealing its secrets. Called the Antikythera Mechanism, study has shown that this improbably preserved object is actually an ancient Greek astronomical computer of a technical sophistication not seen until the clock making traditions of Medieval Europe—1,500 years after the Mechanism is believed to have been made (about 200 BC).Recent advances in computer imaging as well as painstaking scholarship have finally elucidated nearly all details of the Mechanism.

Join us as we dive into the mysterious history of the Antikythera Mechanism, guided by several world experts: marine archeologist Brendan Foley will describe his 2014 diving expedition to the original Antikythera wreck site; Michael Wright, former curator of mechanical engineering at the Science Museum in London, will describe the structure and recreation of the Mechanism at University College London and will be bringing a model of the device to the Museum for audience members to explore, and professor Nicolaos Alexopoulos will discuss sociology, engineering, and science in ancient Greece.
May 10, 2015 9:30 AM Speaker Series
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring Cisco's Shraddha Chaplot
Join us on May 10th for a very special Mother’s Day edition of Design_Code_Build! We invite mothers and their children to participate in this day-long program together. Middle school students will enjoy a shared hands-on learning experience with their mothers as they work together to explore problem-solving and programming. Meet other families in the area and celebrate a geeky Mother’s Day with us!
Join us on May 10th for a very special Mother’s Day edition of Design_Code_Build! We invite mothers and their children to participate in this day-long program together. Middle school students will enjoy a shared hands-on learning experience with their mothers as they work together to explore problem-solving and programming. Meet other families in the area and celebrate a geeky Mother’s Day with us!

About Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events put on by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and working with Museum docents to investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.
Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.
May 5, 2015 7:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace & Babbage Author Sydney Padua in Conversation with Google Doodle Leader Ryan Germick
Sydney Padua in Conversation with Google Doodle Leader Ryan Germick
Sydney Padua is a graphic artist and animator. Sydney wrote this “Steampunk” graphic novel based on thorough research on the biographies and correspondence between Babbage and Lovelace, as well as other bits of early Victoriana, which is then twisted for humorous effect. Ryan Germick, our moderator, first graced the Museum’s stage in 2012 as a panel participant in The Art & Technology of Google Doodles Revolutionaries program. His pairing with Sydney will most definitely result in a thrilling and adventurous evening you won’t want to miss. Please join us.
A graphic novel debut that transforms a compelling scientific collaboration into an unexpected -- and hilarious -- series of adventures.

Meet Victorian London’s most dynamic duo: Charles Babbage, the unrealized inventor of the computer, and his accomplice, Ada, Countess of Lovelace, the peculiar protoprogrammer and daughter of Lord Byron. When Lovelace translated a description of Babbage’s plans for an enormous mechanical calculating machine in 1842, she added annotations three times longer than the original work. Her footnotes contained the first appearance of the general computing theory, a hundred years before an actual computer was built. Sadly, Lovelace died of cancer a decade after publishing the paper, and Babbage never built any of his machines.

But do not despair! The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage presents a rollicking alternate reality in which Lovelace and Babbage do build the Difference Engine and then use it to build runaway economic models, battle the scourge of spelling errors, explore the wilder realms of mathematics, and, of course, fight crime—for the sake of both London and science.

Sydney Padua is a graphic artist and animator. Sydney wrote this “Steampunk” graphic novel based on thorough research on the biographies and correspondence between Babbage and Lovelace, as well as other bits of early Victoriana, which is then twisted for humorous effect. Ryan Germick, our moderator, first graced the Museum’s stage in 2012 as a panel participant in The Art & Technology of Google Doodles Revolutionaries program. His pairing with Sydney will most definitely result in a thrilling and adventurous evening you won’t want to miss. Please join us.

There will be a book signing following tonight’s program. Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of the book before and after the program.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be recording this program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

Members, please note that there is no member reception before the program. The Cloud Café will be open, come grab a quick bite, a glass of wine and connect with fellow CHM friends!
Apr 25, 2015 6:00 PM Fellow Awards
CHM Presents
2015 Fellow Awards
2015 Fellow Awards
On April 25, the Computer History Museum will be honoring the achievements of the 2015 Fellows whose creativity, persistence, vision, and global influence in the field of computing have helped shape our everyday lives.
On April 25, the Computer History Museum will be honoring the achievements of the 2015 Fellows whose creativity, persistence, vision, and global influence in the field of computing have helped shape our everyday lives.

The Fellow Awards annually honor distinguished technology leaders who have forever changed the world with their accomplishments. These prestigious awards celebrate the Fellows, their advancement of computing history, and the positive impact of their contributions on global society. The Computer History Museum is proud to highlight and preserve the stories of these esteemed technology heroes for future generations.

THE 2015 FELLOW HONOREES
Evelyn Berezin, for her early work in computer design
and a lifetime of entrepreneurial activity.

Charles Bachman, for his early work on developing
database management systems.

Bjarne Stroustrup, for his invention of the C++
programming language.
Apr 17, 2015 10:00 AM Speaker Series
CHM and CHF Presents
Moore's Law @ 50
Gordon Moore: the Man and the Law
Moore's Law @ 50
On April 19, 1965, Gordon Moore—chemist, semiconductor pioneer, and co-founder of Intel Corporation—published a paper in Electronics magazine titled “Cramming More Components onto Integrated Circuits.” In it he set forth the concept that became known as “Moore’s Law,” a principle that has propelled the digital revolution for half a century.

Moore’s Law is an observation that the number of transistors on microchips doubles roughly every two years – making electronics both less expensive and better -- and has held true since Moore first made the prediction.
On April 19, 1965, Gordon Moore—chemist, semiconductor pioneer, and co-founder of Intel Corporation—published a paper in Electronics magazine titled “Cramming More Components onto Integrated Circuits.” In it he set forth the concept that became known as “Moore’s Law,” a principle that has propelled the digital revolution for half a century.

Moore’s Law is an observation that the number of transistors on microchips doubles roughly every two years – making electronics both less expensive and better — and has held true since Moore first made the prediction. The impact of Moore’s Law is computing that has become cheap, powerful and ubiquitous. In this, Gordon Moore has been both a visionary and prime mover of the Information Age.

Moore’s life story is one of an innovator and businessman whose influence on technology is arguably as profound as that of Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, or Bill Gates. Now, for the first time, that story is told in his authorized biography—Moore’s Law: The Life of Gordon Moore, Silicon Valley’s Quiet Revolutionary. The book chronicles Moore’s life—from his upbringing and education in California to his professional career at Shockley Semiconductor, Fairchild and Intel. It gives context to the high-tech dynamism he helped to unleash, and provides a clear and accessible introduction to the story of silicon electronics—the technological foundation that has transformed commerce, defense and every-day life around the world.


In partnership with the Chemical Heritage Foundation, we will celebrate the 50th anniversary of Moore’s Law with a two-part symposium.

Part 1: Moore's Law: The Life of Gordon Moore, Silicon Valley's Quiet Revolutionary

The morning session will feature a conversation with the biography’s co-authors Arnold Thackray and David C. Brock. Thackray and Brock are both senior figures at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia—Thackray is the Chancellor, and Brock is Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Research. Together with London-based journalist Rachel Jones, they have meticulously crafted a biography that clearly reveals Moore’s life and his contributions. Museum CEO John Hollar will lead an in-depth conversation with Thackray and Brock about their writing and the impact of Moore’s work. Please reserve your spot by registering at the link below.

Luncheon will follow the first half of the day. A Commemoration of Moore's Law at 50 film will be shown during this time. Please reserve your spot by registering at the link below.

Part 2: Moore's Law: Past and Future

In the afternoon, Brock will moderate a panel session on the past and future of Moore’s Law. Panelists include 2002 Museum Fellow Carver Mead, the Gordon and Betty Moore Professor Emeritus of Engineering and Applied Science at the California Institute of Technology, and William H. Davidow, partner at Mohr Davidow Ventures, former Intel executive and author of several books on technology, including Overcorrected. The afternoon panel will also feature the Silicon Valley premiere of a 13-minute video of Gordon Moore himself speaking on Moore’s Law, its impact, and future. Please reserve your spot by registering at the link below.

We are also delighted to welcome Jody Roberts, Director for the Institute for Research at CHF, who also will be taking part in the day’s events.

Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of Moore's Law: The Life of Gordon Moore, Silicon Valley's Quiet Revolutionary before and after the program. There will be a book signing when the program adjourns.

Join us for this fascinating look at the life of one of the computing epoch’s most influential figures and a glimpse ahead at the implications for Moore’s Law in the future.
Apr 15, 2015 7:00 PM Special Events
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries on the Road
KQED's John Boland & NPR's Jarl Mohn in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Invitation-only Event
KQED's John Boland & NPR's Jarl Mohn in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
"Re/New: The Future of News" will kick off with a conversation with KQED President & CEO John Boland and NPR President & CEO Jarl Mohn. Boland is re-inventing KQED on a local and regional level and setting a new generation of news in motion on television, radio and the internet. Mohn, who has headed NPR for less than a year but has significant media experience, plans to extend and deepen broadcast and digital news at NPR. Together they represent some of the best thinking -and action – about the future in either commercial or public media.
In 2015 the Museum will produce a new track within our Revolutionaries series, "Re/New: The Future of News." Technology is changing everything about the news and journalism industries—from gathering to processing to disseminating, and audience behavior and participation as well. This track will feature a series of conversations with news leaders and innovators about that changing landscape.

"Re/New: The Future of News" will kick off with a conversation with KQED President & CEO John Boland and NPR President & CEO Jarl Mohn. Boland is re-inventing KQED on a local and regional level and setting a new generation of news in motion on television, radio and the internet. Mohn, who has headed NPR for less than a year but has significant media experience, plans to extend and deepen broadcast and digital news at NPR. Together they represent some of the best thinking -and action – about the future in either commercial or public media.

Tonight’s program will be an in-depth conversation with these outstanding executives about everything from their beginnings in media, the history of their organizations, how their approach to journalism is evolving, technology’s impact on what they do, and the changing nature of digital audiences. Our moderator, John Hollar, began his career as a reporter, so he’s well suited to conduct an insightful and engaging conversation with these two media mavericks.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success. Please Note: This Revolutionaries on the Road will take place in KQED’s Studio A in San Francisco. Because seating in the studio is extremely limited, the program will be invitation-only. It will be available on our YouTube channel within a week. And, KQED Radio is recording the event and will broadcast it on Saturday, April 18 at 2pm, and again on Thursday, April 23 at 8pm.
Apr 7, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Becoming Steve Jobs Authors Brent Schlender & Rick Tetzeli in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader
Becoming Steve Jobs Authors Brent Schlender & Rick Tetzeli in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Becoming Steve Jobs takes on and breaks down the existing myth and stereotypes about Steve Jobs. The conventional, one-dimensional view of Jobs is that he was half-genius, half-jerk from youth, an irascible and selfish leader who slighted friends and family alike. Becoming Steve Jobs answers the central question about the life and career of the Apple cofounder and CEO: How did a young man so reckless and arrogant that he was exiled from the company he founded become the most effective visionary business leader of our time, ultimately transforming the daily life of billions of people?
Still, I was always the reporter and Steve was the source and subject; I was the ink-stained wretch, and he was the rock star. More than anything, he wanted to get his stories told to the biggest and best audience possible, and I could give him that. For my part, I could sense he was bound for even bigger things and wanted to have a front-row seat. And so the overarching purpose for our social and personal interactions for the next 20 years would be journalistic transactions. And not all of them would please him.
Brent Schlender, Fortune Magazine
October 25, 2011


There have been many books—on a large and small scale—about Steve Jobs, one of the most famous CEOs in history. But this book is different from all the others.

Becoming Steve Jobs takes on and breaks down the existing myth and stereotypes about Steve Jobs. The conventional, one-dimensional view of Jobs is that he was half-genius, half-jerk from youth, an irascible and selfish leader who slighted friends and family alike. Becoming Steve Jobs answers the central question about the life and career of the Apple cofounder and CEO: How did a young man so reckless and arrogant that he was exiled from the company he founded become the most effective visionary business leader of our time, ultimately transforming the daily life of billions of people?

Drawing on incredible and sometimes exclusive access, Schlender and Tetzeli tell a different story of a real human being who wrestled with his failings and learned to maximize his strengths over time. Their rich, compelling narrative is filled with stories never told before from the people who knew Jobs best, and who decided to open up to the authors, including his family, former inner circle executives, and top people at Apple, Pixar and Disney, most notably Tim Cook, Jony Ive, Eddy Cue, Ed Catmull, John Lasseter, Robert Iger and many others. In addition, Brent knew Jobs personally for 25 years and draws upon his many interviews with him, on and off the record, in writing the book. He and Rick humanize the man and explain, rather than simply describe, his behavior. Along the way, the book provides rich context about the technology revolution we all have lived through, and the ways in which Jobs changed our world.

John Hollar will moderate a conversation with the authors about Steve Jobs’ evolution and also about the book’s genesis and their collaboration. Please join us.

A book signing will follow the program. Kepler's Books will be on-site selling copies of the book before and after the program.

CSPAN Book TV will be recording this program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

Mar 19, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
FIA Formula E Racing: Drive the Future
Fasten your seat belt and plan to join us for an inspiring and educational ride as we learn more about how Formula E is revolutionizing the world of racing.
The inaugural race was unexpectedly dramatic. A crash at the last turn of the final lap involving the leading cars allowed the Brazilian driver Lucas di Grassi of the Audi Sport ABT team to win. The Beijing ePrix took place in Olympic Park, site of the 2008 Olympics. The cars made 25 laps on the 3.44 kilometer course, weaving between the Water Cube and Bird’s Nest.”
Becky Davis, The New York Times
September 13, 2014


Formula E is a new FIA (International Automobile Association) single-seater championship and the world’s first fully electric racing series. It runs from September 2014 through to June 2015, and will compete in the heart of nine of the world’s leading cities, from Beijing to London, racing around their iconic landmarks. For the inaugural season, ten teams, each with two drivers, will go head to head creating a unique and exciting racing series designed to appeal to a new generation of motorsport fans. Team owners include Sir Richard Branson, the four-time Formula One champion Alain Prost and the actor Leonardo DiCaprio. Drivers include Formula One veteran Jarno Trulli, Lucas de Grassi and Katherine Leggae.

Formula E represents CEO Alejandro Agag’s vision for the future of the motor industry over the coming decades, serving as a framework for R&D around the electric vehicle, accelerating general interest in these cars and promoting sustainability. Agag sees the research and development of electric racing cars as a catalyst for the development of tomorrow’s clean city cars. With over a decade of motorsports experience and years of shaping global and social issues as a politician, Agag is determined to revolutionize the world of clean mobility on the racetrack, city streets and consumer markets.

We look forward to welcoming Alejandro Agag to our stage, and to learning more about his vision for this inaugural race and beyond. John Hollar will moderate a conversation about the nuts and bolts of how racing electric vehicles really works and the larger sustainability mission driving Agag. They will also talk about the challenges involved in raising the $100 million necessary to launch, and in recruiting ten teams and drivers. And, of course we’ll learn about the technology that’s been incorporated into the cars, and how Formula E is using social media to enhance the fan experience.

The Museum is very fortunate to host this program in advance of the two races in U.S. cities – Miami in March and Long Beach in April. We’ve also invited Agag to bring along a team owner and a driver, and hope to confirm their participation very soon.

Fasten your seat belt and plan to join us for an inspiring and educational ride as we learn more about how Formula E is revolutionizing the world of racing.

We are pleased that KQED Radio is recording this program for broadcast on Thursday, May 7 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Mar 14, 2015 10:30 AM Education Event
Pi Day Celebration
Be Irrational. Celebrate Pi Day!
Who says you can’t have your Pi and eat it, too? Not us! Join us at the Computer History Museum and celebrate the never-ending number with Pi-themed activities and fun for all ages! Enjoy music in our lobby and delicious PiE, PiZZA, and PiNTS, available for purchase in our Cloud Café.
Who says you can’t have your Pi and eat it, too? Not us! Join us at the Computer History Museum and celebrate the never-ending number with Pi-themed activities and fun for all ages! Enjoy music in our lobby and delicious PiE, PiZZA, and PiNTS, available for purchase in our Cloud Café.

“π” is the symbol used in mathematics to represent the constant ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, which is approximately 3.1415926. To celebrate this phenomenon, math and science lovers everywhere have been joining together since 1988 to honor Pi on 3/14—an homage to the first three digits of everyone’s favorite number. The year 2015 brings a rare opportunity to celebrate on the month, day, and year of the first five digits of Pi—3/14/15. Check out our activity schedule and special hours for all Pi Day details!

Early Hours and Admission Information:
9:26 AM—The Museum is opening its doors early in honor of the sixth, seventh, and eighth digits of Pi and granting FREE admission to eager partygoers who arrive before or at 9:26 AM.

9:27–10 AM—Enjoy half-priced admission. All Pi Day activities are included with admission.

10 AM—Regular admission. Pi Day activities are included with Museum admission and free to Museum members.
Space is limited for some events and workshops. To reserve your spot, register at the links below.
Feb 28 - Mar 1, 2015 11:00 AM Special Events
Adobefest Community Weekend
Celebrating 25 Years of Photoshop
Adobefest
Please join us at the Computer History Museum to see live demos of Photoshop, explore vintage photography equipment, and learn the basics of Photoshop using an interactive exhibit or by attending a one-hour workshop.
Adobe Photoshop is one of the most successful pieces of software ever written. Now used by millions of graphics and photographic professionals worldwide, Photoshop has come to shape the entire visual environment of 21st-century culture. Gum wrappers, subway signs, billboards, book covers, Hollywood special effects, posters, portraits, product packaging, brochures, animation, architecture, astronomy, fashion design, forensic investigations, medicine, industrial design, photography, web design—the list of Photoshop applications is limitless.

Please join us at the Computer History Museum to see live demos of Photoshop, explore vintage photography equipment, and learn the basics of Photoshop using an interactive exhibit or by attending a one-hour workshop.

Free admission to Adobe employees and their guests, with a company badge presented.

Regular admission to the Museum is required for the general public.
Space is limited for Adobe Photoshop Family Workshop sessions. To reserve your spot, register here.
Feb 27, 2015 8:30 AM Education Series
CHM Presents
Talking to the Future 2015
Talking to the Future 2015
Talking to the Future is a live annual event that brings local high school students and their teachers together with a diverse group of innovators.
Talking to the Future brings high school students and tech innovators together to share ideas and inspire each other to transform creative concepts into viable solutions for today’s global challenges. During a dynamic day filled with design challenges, speaker panels, and interactive demonstrations, participants learn about the challenges, opportunities, and processes involved in innovation and entrepreneurship. Using the Museum’s collections, students learn from the past as they prepare for their future as tomorrow’s innovators.

For more information, visit: computerhistory.org/education/getinvested or email Aimee Gardner: agardner@computerhistory.org.
Special thanks to our donors for the Get Invested program, of which Talking to the Future is part:
Severns Family Foundation, Oracle, SanDisk Foundation
Feb 20, 2015 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Computing: The Human Experience-Anarchy & Order with IBM Fellow Grady Booch
Anarchy & Order with IBM Fellow Grady Booch
Anarchy and Order, presented by Grady Booch, is the fourth lecture in the documentary project, Computing: The Human Experience. Here, we examine the ways that governments have used computing to further their means, for good and for evil...
The worst thing in the world, next to anarchy, is government.
— Henry Beecher Ward

The care of human life and happiness, said Thomas Jefferson, is the first and only object of good government. As such, governments – and the political institutions, legal structures, and economic infrastructures that support them – seek to apply all of the resources around them to further their reach and their control. This is especially true of technology: in every industrialized age, governments have used technology to tax their citizens, to protect their borders and their economic interests, to communicate and shape opinion, and to monitor their activities.

The continual challenge, of course, is how governments use such technology in the care of human life and happiness balanced against the tyranny and subterfuge that this same technology makes possible.

Unlike every other age, however, computing has changed this balance. At one time, communication traveled at the speed of a horse; now most every war, no matter how distant, is broadcast in real time. At one time, governments acted on information limited by the ability of human processes to gather it; now we govern based on an embarrassment of digital riches whose collection and visibility are not necessarily transparent. At one time the speed and the reach of political and military action was constrained by the movement of matter; now we may observe another human – or kill another human – a literal world away, almost instantaneously.

Anarchy and Order, presented by Grady Booch, is the fourth lecture in the documentary project, Computing: The Human Experience. Here, we examine the ways that governments have used computing to further their means, for good and for evil. We will explore how governments and legal systems have evolved not only to embrace computing but also how they are subtly being reshaped by computing (and in many ways being left behind). In our journey, we will see how Lincoln’s use of technology foreshadowed our present day governmental overreaching. We will consider some of the contemporary, pragmatic issues that computing presents, such as the legal implications of a first strike cyberwar policy and the very meaning of privacy as weighed against a government’s need for security., Finally, we will contemplate the future of governing in an age of abundant and relentless information that respects no cultural or political borders, leading us to ponder how to live as a citizen in a digital world.
Feb 19, 2015 7:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Mastering the Pixel: 25 Years of Photoshop
Mastering the Pixel
Adobe Photoshop is one of the most successful pieces of software ever written. Now used by millions of graphics and photographic professionals worldwide, Photoshop has come to shape the entire visual environment of 21-century culture. Gum wrappers, subway signs, billboards, book covers, Hollywood special effects, posters, portraits, product packaging, brochures, animation, architecture, astronomy, fashion design, forensic investigations, medicine, industrial design, photography, web...
Adobe Photoshop is one of the most successful pieces of software ever written. Now used by millions of graphics and photographic professionals worldwide, Photoshop has come to shape the entire visual environment of 21-century culture. Gum wrappers, subway signs, billboards, book covers, Hollywood special effects, posters, portraits, product packaging, brochures, animation, architecture, astronomy, fashion design, forensic investigations, medicine, industrial design, photography, web design—the list of Photoshop applications is almost limitless.

How did this remarkable tool come to be and what has been its influence on our lives and larger culture? Join us for a remarkable, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to hear the answers from four key people who made Photoshop what it is today:

Russell Brown – Original Photoshop evangelist
Steve Guttman - Original Photoshop product manager
Thomas Knoll – Photoshop co-creator
John Knoll - Photoshop co-creator

Please join us for this special panel discussion on Photoshop, a unique creativity tool that has changed our world and how we see it forever.

Members, please note that there is no member reception before the program. The Cloud Café will be open, come grab a quick bite, a glass of wine and connect with fellow CHM friends!
Feb 18, 2015 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Believer Author David Axelrod in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Believer Author David Axelrod in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Join us for an engaging conversation with a man who, after 40 years in politics, is still a believer, and is working to help inspire and train the next generation of leaders.
The strategist who masterminded Obama’s historic election campaigns, and their breakthrough use of technology, opens up about his years as a young journalist, political consultant, and ultimately senior adviser to the president.

The man behind some of the greatest political changes of the last decade, David Axelrod has devoted a lifetime to questioning political certainties and daring to bring fresh thinking into the political landscape. Whether as a child hearing John F. Kennedy stump in New York, or as a strategist guiding the first African American to the White House, Axelrod shows in Believer how his own life stands at the center of a tumultuous American century.

Believer begins in 1960s New York, but rapidly moves west. As a young newspaperman in the Chicago of the 1970s and 1980s, Axelrod reported on the dissolution of the last of the big city political machines, along with the emergence of a black, independent movement that made Obama’s ascent possible. Seeing the golden age of Chicago journalism collapse, Axelrod switched careers to become a political strategist, working for path breakers like Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton and morally conflicted characters like John Edwards. For better and worse, Axelrod helped to redefine the techniques by which modern political campaigns are run.

Our moderator, John Hollar, will explore with Axelrod all of the above plus the impact story of technology – from social media to Web 2.0 and big data and beyond – utilized by campaigns but also by the electorate, and what the implications may be on our politics and public policy.

Join us for an engaging conversation with a man who, after 40 years in politics, is still a believer, and is working to help inspire and train the next generation of leaders.

Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of Believer before and after the program. There will be a book signing when the program adjourns.

We are pleased that KQED Radio will be on site recording this program for broadcast on March 11 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success. Note that this Revolutionaries program will begin at 12:00PM, with a 30 minute book signing following the program's end about 1:15PM.
Jan 29, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Composer & Cellist Philip Sheppard in Conversation with Sid Lee's Will Travis
Composer & Cellist Philip Sheppard in Conversation with Sid Lee's Will Travis
Sheppard says that, for him, creativity is like oxygen. The Museum has invited him to bring his cello to help illustrate exactly why that is so. Please join us for an inspiring and illuminating evening.
I like smashing new technology into old technology and the older the technology the better. One of the cellos I use was made in the 17th century, and some of the equipment I use was made last week. I find if you pull from as far away as possible, you often end up with a much more interesting result.”
Philip Sheppard
Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, June 2014


Philip Sheppard has gathered international acclaim for his diverse career as a composer, conductor, an arranger, and innovative performer. His work reinvents perceptions of classical music and succeeds in engaging a huge range of audiences from different musical backgrounds. Musical collaborator for both the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games and the opening ceremony of the 2014 Tour de France, Sheppard has also worked with such musical legends as David Bowie and Jeff Buckley and frequently speaks and plays at technology and creative conferences. A cellist and graduate of London’s Royal Academy of Music, where he is now a professor and a fellow, he lives happily in both the classical and rock music worlds. He has also forged a highly successful career as a film music composer and recently wrote the score for the new BBC Two Human Universe series, featuring English physicist Professor Brian Cox.

Will Travis of Sid Lee returns to the Museum’s stage to moderate a conversation with Sheppard about the intersection of music and technology. They’ll discuss the impact technology has had on Sheppard’s work, from composing to teaching to performing, while also addressing how he bridges the new and old worlds, including what exactly it means to “smash” new and old technologies. Other topics of conversation will include Sheppard’s views on today’s changing music industry—the impact on musicians and how the world finds and experiences music.

Sheppard says that, for him, creativity is like oxygen. The Museum has invited him to bring his cello to help illustrate exactly why that is so. Please join us for an inspiring and illuminating evening.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will record this program for future broadcast.


This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

Members, please note that there is no member reception before the program. The Cloud Café will be open, come grab a quick bite, a glass of wine and connect with fellow CHM friends!
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2014 Events

Dec 17, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Defy Ventures Founder & CEO Catherine Hoke in Conversation with NPR's Laura Sydell
Defy Ventures' Catherine Hoke in Conversation with NPR's Laura Sydell
Tonight Catherine Hoke, Founder and CEO of Defy Ventures, will sit down for a conversation with NPR’s Digital Culture Correspondent Laura Sydell. They’ll talk about Hoke’s background, her experience in private equity and venture capital here in the Bay Area, and how visiting a prison in Texas transformed her life and ultimately showed her the value of "investing in the margins." Later in the conversation they'll be joined on stage by one of Defy’s EITs, who will give a firsthand account of the impact of the program and its power to transform lives. Please join us for an inspirational evening.
"I wish we'd ask ourselves, what would it be like if I was only known for the worst thing I've done? Moved by empathy, we’d recognize people for who they are today and not for the mistakes they made yesterday. Millions with criminal histories would unlock their potential."
Catherine Hoke
Founder & CEO, Defy Ventures


Defy Ventures is a NYC-based entrepreneurship, employment and character training program that recognizes that many former drug dealers and gang leaders can become successful, legal entrepreneurs. Defy “transforms the hustle” of formerly incarcerated Entrepreneurs-in-Training (EITs) by offering intensive leadership development, Shark Tank-style business plan competitions, executive mentoring, financial investment and startup incubation. Defy intentionally builds life-giving, authentic community between EITs and their executive volunteers as they bond in their humanity.

Leveraging technology, Defy has created a "blended learning" model that holds the promise of scaling globally to revitalize the most underserved communities. Defy's online instructors include underdog-loving influencers like Tim Draper (Founder, Draper Fisher Jurvetson), Duncan Niederauer (CEO, NYSE), and Seth Godin (marketing guru).

Tonight Catherine Hoke, Founder and CEO of Defy Ventures, will sit down for a conversation with NPR’s Digital Culture Correspondent Laura Sydell. They’ll talk about Hoke’s background, her experience in private equity and venture capital here in the Bay Area, and how visiting a prison in Texas transformed her life and ultimately showed her the value of "investing in the margins." Later in the conversation they'll be joined on stage by one of Defy’s EITs, who will give a firsthand account of the impact of the program and its power to transform lives. Please join us for an inspirational evening.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Dec 9, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Theranos Founder & CEO Elizabeth Holmes in Conversation with KQED's Michael Krasny
Theranos Founder & CEO Elizabeth Holmes in Conversation with KQED's Michael Krasny
We’re very pleased to welcome KQED’s Michael Krasny back to our stage to moderate an in-depth conversation with a woman who wants nothing less than to revolutionize the health care system using technology, creativity and innovation.
I don’t want to make an incremental change in some technology in my life. I want to create a whole new technology, and one that is aimed at helping humanity at all levels regardless of geography or ethnicity or age or gender.
Elizabeth Holmes
Fortune Magazine June 12, 2014


Elizabeth Holmes believed from an early age that starting her own company would afford her the greatest opportunity to make change in the world. She left Stanford's School of Engineering in 2003, at the age of 19, to found Theranos – a new paradigm of diagnosis designed to detect the onset of disease in time to do something about it, without having to wait for the emergence of physical symptoms. It’s now worth more than $9 billion, with just under 700 employees, and is headquartered in Palo Alto. In addition to being its founder & CEO, she is a named inventor on 98 U.S. and 205 foreign patent applications, of which 19 in the U.S. and 75 abroad have been issued.

Holmes believes that access to real-time, affordable diagnostic information is a basic human right. Theranos is thus on a mission to make actionable health information accessible to people everywhere in the world at the time it matters, enabling early detection and intervention of disease. She has led the creation of a laboratory infrastructure that requires just a few drops of blood to perform up to 70 tests on a single sample. By optimizing the chemistries used and leveraging software, Theranos’ labs can perform these tests faster, cheaper and with much less discomfort, to fundamentally redefine the paradigm of clinical diagnosis.

We’re very pleased to welcome KQED’s Michael Krasny back to our stage to moderate an in-depth conversation with a woman who wants nothing less than to revolutionize the health care system using technology, creativity and innovation.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be recording tonight's program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Dec 7, 2014 8:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build with Rock Star Shuchi Grover
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a daylong education program put on by the Computer History Museum. Each event is filled with activities that explore the basics of computer programming, from concept to coding. Students will meet inspiring tech industry “rock stars,” build their own working computers using a Raspberry Pi, and investigate how programming was done in the past. The day will end with creative group presentations in which students will showcase the concepts and skills they have learned.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a daylong education program put on by the Computer History Museum. Each event is filled with activities that explore the basics of computer programming, from concept to coding. Students will meet inspiring tech industry “rock stars,” build their own working computers using a Raspberry Pi, and investigate how programming was done in the past. The day will end with creative group presentations in which students will showcase the concepts and skills they have learned.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.

About Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events put on by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and working with Museum docents to investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.
IMAGE USE CONSENT:
Note that by registering for this program, you grant permission to the Computer History Museum (CHM) to take photos and video to use in materials related to CHM programs, and further understand and agree that CHM is not legally liable, financially or otherwise, for use of these images.
Dec 3, 2014 7:00 PM Cinema Series
CHM Presents
A Private Screening of THE IMITATION GAME
A Private Screening of THE IMITATION GAME
The Museum is delighted to be screening THE IMITATION GAME, and very much appreciate the Weinstein Company working with us to make this screening possible.
THE IMITATION GAME is a dramatic portrayal of the life and work of one of Britain's most extraordinary unsung heroes, Alan Turing. Benedict Cumberbatch ("The Fifth Estate", "Star Trek Into Darkness", and TV’s "Sherlock") and Keira Knightley (BAFTA nominee for “Atonement”, Oscar® nominee for "Pride and Prejudice") star as Turing and his ally and fellow code-breaker Joan Clarke, alongside a top-notch cast, including Matthew Goode (“Stoker”, "A Single Man"), Mark Strong ("Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy"), Rory Kinnear ("Skyfall"), Charles Dance ("Gosford Park", TV's "Game of Thrones"), Allen Leech (“In Fear”, TV’s "Downton Abbey") and Matthew Beard ("An Education").

Norwegian filmmaker Morten Tyldum, 2012 BAFTA nominee for "Headhunters", directs from a screenplay by Graham Moore, based on the book "Alan Turing: The Enigma" by Andrew Hodges. Black Bear Pictures’ Teddy Schwarzman produces alongside Bristol Automotive’s Nora Grossman and Ido Ostrowsky, with Moore as executive producer and Peter Heslop (“The King’s Speech”) as co-producer. Behind-the-camera talent includes director of photography Óscar Faura (“The
Impossible”), editor William Goldenberg (Oscar® winner for “Argo”), production designer Maria Djurkovic (“Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”), costume designer Sammy Sheldon Differ ("Kick-Ass"), hair and make-up designer Ivana Primorac (“Anna Karenina”), casting director Nina Gold (“Les Miserables”) and composer Alexandre Desplat (Oscar® nominee for “Argo”).

The film was shot in England over eight weeks on locations in London, Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Dorset, including a Victorian mansion which was the former home of author and naval intelligence officer Ian Fleming, a disused RAF base, King's Cross station, Sherborne School, where the young Turing was educated and the Bletchley Park codebreaking centre itself.

The Museum is delighted to be screening THE IMITATION GAME, and we very much appreciate the Weinstein Company's help in making it possible. THIS IS AN INVITATION ONLY EVENT
Nov 18, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
IBM's Chairman & CEO Ginni Rometty in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
IBM's Ginni Rometty in Conversation with the Museum's John Hollar
Join us tonight as John Hollar sits down for a conversation with Ginni Rometty about technology, innovation and change.
IBM is at the center of computing’s history and future like few other enterprises in the world. Today it is a globally integrated technology company headquartered in Armonk, New York. In its 103-year history of solving problems and providing leading-edge technology to businesses, governments and non-profits, it has had only nine chief executives. In this edition of Revolutionaries, we welcome Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Ginni Rometty.

Ginni Rometty began her career at IBM 33 years ago and has held a series of leadership positions, most recently as Senior Vice President and Group Executive, IBM Sales, Marketing and Strategy. In January 2012 she was appointed to her current position as the company’s chief executive.

Under her leadership, IBM is embarking on a bold transformation agenda to lead in a new era of computing, where unprecedented amounts of data are being generated every moment, powerful business and technology services are accessed via the cloud, and people are connecting in new ways through mobile and social networks, placing new demands on security.

Join us tonight as John Hollar sits down for a conversation with Ginni Rometty about technology, innovation and change.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Nov 15, 2014 8:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build with Rock Star Regis Vincent
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a daylong education program put on by the Computer History Museum. Each event is filled with activities that explore the basics of computer programming, from concept to coding. Students will meet inspiring tech industry “rock stars,” build their own working computers using a Raspberry Pi, and investigate how programming was done in the past. The day will end with creative group presentations in which students will showcase the concepts and skills they have learned.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a daylong education program put on by the Computer History Museum. Each event is filled with activities that explore the basics of computer programming, from concept to coding. Students will meet tech industry "rock star", Dr. Regis Vincent, Associate Director in Robotics at SRI International. They will build their own working computers using a Raspberry Pi, and investigate how programming was done in the past. The day will end with creative group presentations in which students will showcase the concepts and skills they have learned.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.

About Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events put on by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and working with Museum docents to investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

IMAGE USE CONSENT:
Note that by registering for this program, you grant permission to the Computer History Museum (CHM) to take photos and video to use in materials related to CHM programs, and further understand and agree that CHM is not legally liable, financially or otherwise, for use of these images.
Oct 14, 2014 7:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
The Innovators Author Walter Isaacson in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
The Innovators Author Walter Isaacson in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Join John Hollar for an in-depth conversation with Isaacson on this new book, which continues his exploration of innovation and genius, from Jobs to Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein. We are very pleased to welcome Walter Isaacson back to our stage.
The Innovators: How a Group of Inventors, Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution

Following his biography of Steve Jobs, award-winning author Walter Isaacson became fascinated with other compelling stories of the men and women who have led the global revolution of the Information Age. The Innovators is his revealing account of the revolutionaries who created the computer and the Internet, yet it begins in Victorian England. It is destined to be a standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens.

Isaacson asks: What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs—but not others—to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail? Isaacson begins with Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s daughter, who pioneered computer programming in the 1840s. He explores the fascinating personalities that created the digital revolution, including Vannevar Bush, Alan Turing, John von Neumann, J.C.R. Licklider, Doug Engelbart, Robert Noyce, Bill Gates, Steve Wozniak, Steve Jobs, Tim Berners-Lee, and Larry Page. In his typically energetic and insightful style, Isaacson goes behind the scenes to explore how their minds worked and what made them so inventive. It’s also a narrative of how these innovators’ abilities to collaborate and master the art of teamwork made them even more creative.

Join John Hollar for an in-depth conversation with Isaacson on this new book, which continues his exploration of innovation and genius, from Jobs to Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein. We are very pleased to welcome Walter Isaacson back to our stage.

Kepler's Books will be on-site selling copies of The Innovators before and after the program.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be recording tonight's program for future broadcast.

And, CSPAN Book TV is going to be on-site recording the program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Oct 11, 2014 8:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build with Rock Star Greg Washington
Design_Code_Build with Rock Star Greg Washington
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a daylong education program put on by the Computer History Museum. Each event is filled with activities that explore the basics of computer programming, from concept to coding. Students will meet inspiring tech industry “rock stars,” build their own working computers using a Raspberry Pi, and investigate how programming was done in the past. The day will end with creative group presentations in which students will showcase the concepts and skills they have learned.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a daylong education program put on by the Computer History Museum. Each event is filled with activities that explore the basics of computer programming, from concept to coding. Students will meet inspiring tech industry “rock stars,” build their own working computers using a Raspberry Pi, and investigate how programming was done in the past. The day will end with creative group presentations in which students will showcase the concepts and skills they have learned.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.

About Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events put on by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and working with Museum docents to investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Oct 8, 2014 5:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
How Google Works: Authors Eric Schmidt & Jonathan Rosenberg in Conversation with Yahoo's Marissa Mayer
How Google Works: Authors Eric Schmidt & Jonathan Rosenberg in Conversation with Yahoo's Marissa Mayer
Google Executive Chairman and ex-CEO Eric Schmidt and former SVP of Products Jonathan Rosenberg came to Google over a decade ago as proven technology executives. At the time, the company was already well-known for doing things differently, reflecting the visionary— and frequently contrarian—principles of founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. If Eric and Jonathan were going to succeed, they realized they would have to relearn everything they thought they knew about management and business.
Google Executive Chairman and ex-CEO Eric Schmidt and former SVP of Products Jonathan Rosenberg came to Google over a decade ago as proven technology executives. At the time, the company was already well-known for doing things differently, reflecting the visionary— and frequently contrarian—principles of founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. If Eric and Jonathan were going to succeed, they realized they would have to relearn everything they thought they knew about management and business.

In their new book, "How Google Works," Schmidt and Rosenberg pull back the curtain on the company that has changed the way we work and redefined what it takes to be successful in today’s business environment. The authors offer unprecedented access to Google's practices and the philosophies that define its unique culture, values and strategies.

Our moderator tonight, Marissa Mayer, knows a bit about how Google works, as she spent 13 years there, holding numerous positions including engineer, designer, product manager and executive, before departing to become President and CEO of Yahoo.

We are so pleased to welcome all three to our stage and invite you to join us for a "master class" in leadership and an inside look at an iconic company.

Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of "How Google Works" before and after the program.

KQED Radio will be recording this program for future broadcast.

And, CSPAN Book TV will be on-site recording this program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success. Please note the Program start time – to accommodate the speakers' schedules.
Oct 3, 2014 6:00 PM Special Events
CHM Presents Revolutionaries on the Road
An Evening with Entrepreneur & Philanthropist Steve Case
Invitation Only Event
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries on the Road
Museum CEO John Hollar will lead an in-depth conversation with Steve about his early life in Hawaii, how his passion for starting companies and for supporting entrepreneurs developed, his roller-coaster ride at the top of AOL, his work in the public policy arena and his philanthropic endeavors. They will also discuss his "Rise of the Rest" campaign and tour, giving entrepreneurs outside of Silicon Valley the opportunity to compete for startup funding.
The Museum's well-known Revolutionaries speaker series is going on the road. Our first stop is at NPR's new corporate headquarters and digital news center in Washington, DC, and our first speaker is Steve Case.

Today Case wears many hats—including serving as Chairman and CEO of Revolution LLC, a Washington DC-based investment firm that he co-founded. He is also Chairman of UP Global and Chairman of The Case Foundation.

But Case made his mark in computer history as the co-founder of America Online, where he began his entrepreneurial career in 1985. AOL put much of America online and on the Internet in the 1990s, and its merger with Time Warner in 2000 was one of the epic moments in the dot-com boom. Some observers believe it represented the zenith of the early Internet's heyday before Wall Street and the economy reset the playing field in the early 2000s.

The sum of this work has made Case one of America's best-known and most accomplished entrepreneurs and philanthropists. He is, without question, a pioneer in making the online world part of everyday life.
Museum CEO John Hollar will lead an in-depth conversation with Steve about his early life in Hawaii, how his passion for starting companies and for supporting entrepreneurs developed, his roller-coaster ride at the top of AOL, his work in the public policy arena and his philanthropic endeavors. They will also discuss his "Rise of the Rest" campaign and tour, giving entrepreneurs outside of Silicon Valley the opportunity to compete for startup funding.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be recording tonight's program for broadcast on Thursday, November 6 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Sep 26, 2014 10:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Computer History Museum: Celebrating 35 Years
Join us as Museum co-founder Gordon Bell and Museum Chairman Len Shustek discuss with Museum President and CEO John Hollar the making of the leading museum devoted to the computing and its impact on society.
The Computer History Museum marks its 35th birthday on September 24th. Visitors from around the world see an impressive set of exhibits, but the history of the institution and its collection is almost as interesting as a visit to the Museum itself.

The Museum has come a long way from a coat closet in Massachusetts to the beautiful multi-building permanent facility that today houses engaging exhibits and the largest collection of computing artifacts in the world.

Join us as Museum co-founder Gordon Bell and Museum Chairman Len Shustek discuss with Museum President and CEO John Hollar the making of the leading museum devoted to the computing and its impact on society.

Aug 21, 2014 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
From Mainframe to Smartphone: What an Amazing Trip It's Been with Dr. Dileep Bhandarkar, Qualcomm
From Mainframe to Smartphone: What an Amazing Trip It's Been
Disruptive technologies have caused dramatic changes in computing technology for decades. This talk will show how a series of disruptions have set the course for a world that has evolved from the mainframe to the current smartphone revolution.
Disruptive technologies have caused dramatic changes in computing technology for decades, often in unacknowledged ways. In this talk, Dr. Dileep Bhandarkar will paint a picture that puts these changes into perspective, and which shows how this series of disruptions have set a course that has evolved from the mainframe to the current smartphone, mobile and cloud computing world.

Dr. Bhandarkar has been an architect in the areas of memory and processor design, workstation and server systems, and data center infrastructure while at TI, DEC, Intel, and Microsoft. His current work as VP of Technology at Qualcomm focuses on energy efficient designs for next generation computing platforms. Dileep holds 16 US patents, and has published more than 30 technical papers. He became an IEEE Fellow for his contributions and technical leadership in the design of complex and reduced instruction set architecture, and in computer system performance analysis.


Join us for this fascinating lecture by Dr. Bhandakar as he paints a picture that puts this technology evolution into perspective.

Bring a bag lunch and enjoy the discussion with Museum family and friends. Box lunches will be made available for purchase in the Museum café.

This program is being sponsored by Qualcomm, the Santa Clara Valley Section of the IEEE, and the Computer History Museum.
Aug 7, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Akamai's Co-Founder & CEO Tom Leighton in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Akamai's Tom Leighton in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Join John Hollar for an in-depth conversation with Akamai Co-Founder and CEO Tom Leighton about his distinguished career. We'll also get a peek under the hood at one of the world’s leading Internet infrastructure companies.
"Our customers are located in 192 different countries, and Akamai allows us to deliver a fast experience wherever they might be. Akami has been a very important partner for us to scale Airbnb."
- Nathan BlecharczykCTO and Co-Founder, Airbnb


Akamai's beginnings lie in a challenge posed by World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in early 1995. The father of the Web foresaw the congestion that is now very familiar to Internet users, and he challenged colleagues at MIT to invent a fundamentally new and better way to deliver Internet content.
MIT Professor of Applied Mathematics Tom Leighton, who had an office down the hall from Dr. Berners-Lee, was intrigued by the challenge. Dr. Leighton, a renowned expert on parallel algorithms and architecture, recognized that a solution to Web congestion could be found in applied mathematics and algorithms. He solicited the help of graduate student Danny Lewin, and several other top researchers, to tackle the problem.

The company launched commercial service in 1999 and announced that one of the world’s most trafficked Web properties, Yahoo!, was a charter customer. Now, its customers include the top 30 media and entertainment companies, the top 60 ecommerce companies, all branches of the U.S. military and all major sports leagues. Akamai delivers between 15 to 30% of all Web traffic, and delivers over 2 trillion daily Internet interactions. Its cloud platform contains 147,000 servers in 92 countries, within over 1,200 networks.

Join us as John Hollar navigates an in-depth conversation with Tom Leighton about his distinguished career, and get a peek under the hood at one of the world's leading Internet infrastructure companies.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be recording this program for broadcast on Wednesday, August 20 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Jul 24, 2014 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Intel Trinity: How Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Built the World’s Most Important Company
The Intel Trinity
In today’s world of Google, Facebook, and Twitter, the digital age has all but forgotten its beginnings and the man who created the device upon whom all of these empires rested, the scientist behind two of the greatest inventions of the last century. Once hailed as the “Mayor of Silicon Valley,” Robert Noyce and his colleagues, “the Traitorous Eight,” sparked the technological revolution that...
In today’s world of Google, Facebook, and Twitter, the digital age has all but forgotten its beginnings and the man who created the device upon which all of these empires rested, the scientist behind two of the greatest inventions of the last century. Once hailed as the “Mayor of Silicon Valley,” Robert Noyce and his colleagues, the "Traitorous Eight,” sparked the technological revolution that we are still reaping the rewards from today. Noyce would eventually go on to cofound Intel, one of the most valuable companies in the world. Now, in his comprehensive and entertaining new book, The Intel Trinity: How Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Built the World’s Most Important Company, well-connected and trusted technology writer Michael S. Malone brings to life the story behind the company that made possible the personal computer, the Internet, telecommunications and the personal electronics revolution.

On a warm September morning in 1957 seven key employees of Shockley Transistor of Mountain View, California decided to quit their jobs and strike out on their own, marking the beginning of what would become Silicon Valley. These men would go on to form Fairchild Semiconductor and revolutionize the way we work and live. Drawing on unprecedented access to the Intel archives and on interviews and oral histories from its earliest days through the present, Malone reveals how each member of the founding Intel trio brought different things at different times. Noyce was the charismatic leader and the most respected high-tech figure of his generation. Gordon Moore set the law that accelerated the pace of innovation—the biennial doubling of computer chip performance. Andy Grove was the greatest and most ferocious businessman of his generation. Together, these three achieved Intel’s historic success.

Bring a bag lunch and enjoy the discussion with CHM family and friends. Box lunches will be made available for purchase in the Museum café.

Kepler’s Books will be on-site selling copies of The Intel Trinity before and after the program.
Jul 9, 2014 6:00 PM Special Events
Fearless Genius Exhibit Opening Party
Invite Only Event
The Computer History Museum invites our special guests to the opening of Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985–2000. The evening will include food, wine, and great conversation. Please join us to celebrate the opening of the new exhibit.
The Computer History Museum invites our special guests to the opening of Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985–2000. The evening will include food, wine, and great conversation. Please join us to celebrate the opening of the new exhibit.

Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985–2000 features 50 photographs by renowned documentary photographer Doug Menuez. In his fifteen years of unprecedented behind-the scenes access to Apple, Kleiner Perkins, Adobe, and other iconic Silicon Valley organizations, Menuez captures a pivotal time in the Valley’s history as the computing industry began its transition from analog to digital.

This exhibit chronicles the rise of pioneering innovators like Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Charles Geschke, and John Warnock, while shining a spotlight on the often forgotten moments of the men and women who toiled to turn the digital dream into reality, often at great personal sacrifice and struggle.

This exhibit is made possible through the generosity of Micron Technology.

Photo©Doug Menuez/Contour by Getty Images/Stanford University Libraries
Jul 9, 2014 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Fearless Genius by Doug Menuez
Fearless Genius by Doug Menuez
Award-winning photographer Doug Menuez documented the leading innovators of California’s Silicon Valley during the digital revolution as they invented the technology that would change our world forever. Menuez's project, Fearless Genius, began in 1985 with Steve Jobs as Jobs was starting over after losing a boardroom battle and leaving Apple.
Award-winning photographer Doug Menuez documented the leading innovators of California’s Silicon Valley during the digital revolution as they invented the technology that would change our world forever. Menuez's project, Fearless Genius, began in 1985 with Steve Jobs as Jobs was starting over after losing a boardroom battle and leaving Apple.

In an extraordinary act of trust, Jobs allowed Menuez special access to photograph him as he built a new company, NeXT, and a powerful new supercomputer that Jobs hoped would transform education. Once Silicon Valley heard that Jobs had granted Menuez complete access, everyone did. He spent time photographing more than seventy other leading companies and innovators, including Intel’s Gordon Moore and Andy Grove, Adobe’s John Warnock, and Sun Microsystems’ Bill Joy. Menuez continued working through the Internet boom of the 1990s.

In this talk, Menuez will share eyewitness stories of the unknown sacrifice, insanely hard work, and relentless optimism of a secretive, brilliant tribe during those early and transformative days of the digital revolution. There are significant lessons from this era that are relevant and inspiring for today’s innovators as we attempt to catch the next big wave of transformational technology development.

This event will coincide with the launch of our new exhibit Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley 1985–2000 on display in the lobby from July 9 to September 7, 2014.

Bring a bag lunch and enjoy the discussion with Museum family and friends. Box lunches will be made available for purchase in the Museum café.
©Doug Menuez/Contour by Getty Images/Stanford University Libraries
Jun 11, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar in Conversation with The New York Times' John Markoff
DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar in Conversation with The New York Times' John Markoff
Tonight Dr. Arati Prabhakar will join John Markoff for a conversation about her remarkable career, the Agency's history and impact, initiatives, and new breakthrough technologies like self-destructible computer chips. We will also learn more about her vision for DARPA's future and ways to keep the engine of innovation running in the face of fiscal constraints and other threats.
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) was created by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1958, when the political and defense communities recognized the need for a high-level defense organization to formulate and execute R&D projects that would expand the frontiers of technology and science far beyond immediate military requirements.

DARPA is the Department of Defense's primary innovation engine with a remarkable track record of breakthroughs in its 56 years, from precision guidance and navigation, stealth, night vision, communications and networking. Much of its success is due to hiring remarkable program managers for a finite term, who create projects they decide can really change the world. DARPA makes pivotal early investments in these projects, building and leveraging broad technical communities to help create the capabilities.

Dr. Arati Prabhakar first joined DARPA in 1986 as one of those program managers. After several years in public service she headed to Silicon Valley working largely in the commercial sector, before returning to DARPA’s as its twentieth director. She is uniquely qualified for the role as she has spent her career investing in world-class engineers and scientists to create new technologies and businesses.

Tonight she will join John Markoff for a conversation about her remarkable career, the Agency’s history and impact, initiatives, and new breakthrough technologies like self-destructible computer chips. We’ll also learn more about her vision for DARPA’s future and ways to keep the engine of innovation running in the face of fiscal constraints and other threats.

Please join us.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site recording this program for broadcast Wednesday, July 30 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
May 31 - Jun 1, 2014 10:00 AM Special Events
Community Event
Mountain View Community Weekend at the Computer History Museum!
Featuring our new exhibit: Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles
The Computer History Museum invites Mountain View residents and their families and friends to be our special guests and enjoy a fun-filled day at the Museum.
The Computer History Museum invites Mountain View residents, and their families and friends to be our special guests and enjoy a fun-filled day at the Museum. You’ll see the Museum’s large-scale 25,000 sq. ft. state of the art exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing. Revolution celebrates the spectacular history of computing, from the mysterious ancient devices to technologies of the future. Journey through 19 galleries displaying over 1,000 unique artifacts; discover, in our multimedia displays, the backstories, development drama, and astonishing breakthroughs of the gadgets, gurus and companies you love, or love to hate!

Also, experience our new exhibit Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles which chronicles the decades-long challenge of bringing self-driving cars to the general public. In this timely new exhibit, visitors will learn about the history of autonomous vehicles, enjoy science fiction and popular culture dreams of the driverless family car, get up close with the Google self-driving car, and learn how this amazing technology works.

REVOLUTION, WHERE TO? and more:

  • Experience the Babbage Engine, the PDP-1 Restoration, and the IBM 1401 Demo Lab

  • Learn about the Computer History Museum’s acclaimed lecture series Revolutionaries

  • Shop to your (geeky) heart’s content with 15% off in our Museum store

  • Two-year CHM memberships for the price of one annual membership

  • Find plenty of free parking


If you live or work in Mountain View you will receive free admission for the weekend. Bring as many family and friends along as you'd like! Simply present your proof of residency, or your company badge at the check-in table.
May 9, 2014 10:00 AM Special Events
Member Only Event
Member Preview of New Exhibit: Where to? A History of Autonomous Vehicles
We invite you and a guest to an exclusive member reception and debut of the Computer History Museum's latest visitor experience, Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles on Friday, May 9 from 10 AM to 12 PM. The morning will include a light brunch, mingling and a viewing of the new exhibit before it opens to the public.
We invite you and a guest to an exclusive member reception and debut of the Computer History Museum's latest visitor experience, Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles on Friday, May 9 from 10 AM to 12 PM. The morning will include a light brunch, mingling and a viewing of the new exhibit before it opens to the public.

Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles will chronicle the decades-long challenge of bringing self-driving cars to the general public. Self-driving cars have remained perpetually “two decades away” since the 1930s, while over the past century, autonomous and semi-autonomous vehicles have conquered the air, sea, and roamed the edges of our solar system. In this timely new exhibit, visitors will learn about the history of autonomous vehicles, enjoy science fiction and popular culture dreams of the driverless family car, get up close with the Google self-driving car, and learn how this amazing technology works.

Join us, for this special member celebration.

May 8, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Creativity, Inc: Author Ed Catmull in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Creativity, Inc: Author Ed Catmull in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Ed Catmull, a Fellow of the Computer History Museum, joins John Hollar for a conversation about how to build a sustained creative culture, nurturing both the technical and artistic "poles of creativity."
"Many have attempted to formulate and categorize inspiration and creativity. What Ed Catmull shares instead is his astute experience that creativity isn’t strictly a well of ideas, but an alchemy of people. In Creativity, Inc. Ed reveals, with commonsense specificity and honesty, examples of how not to get in your own way and how to realize a creative coalescence of art, business, and innovation."
- George Lucas

As a young man, Ed Catmull had a dream: to be an animator and an artist. When he learned that he lacked the natural talent for hand-drawn animation, he turned to his other passion: physics, and then computing. That pivot eventually drove a desire within Catmull to make the first computer-animated movie. He nurtured that dream as a Ph.D student at the University of Utah, where many computer graphics pioneers got their start. He eventually forged a partnership with George Lucas—an alliance that led, indirectly, to his founding Pixar Annimation Studios with Steve Jobs and John Lasseter in 1986. Nine years later, Pixar released Toy Story, the first feature-length film created entirely on computers. It changed animation forever.

Pixar has gone on, as of early 2014, to win 27 Academy Awards® for animated filmmaking. When The Walt Disney Company bought Pixar in 2006 for $7.4 billion, Catmull became the President and CEO of the combined Walt Disney Animation Studios. Thus, through his chosen route of physics, mathematics and computing, Ed Catmull realized his dream to be a Disney animator.

The environment that Catmull and his colleagues built at Pixar, and continue within Disney, is based on philosophies that honor the creative process, strike a delicate balance between artistic storytelling and skilled engineering, and defy convention. In his new book, Creativity, Inc., Catmull reveals some of the secrets of Pixar's success and describes his own approach to inspiring excellence in a very large organization over the long term.

Ed Catmull, a Fellow of the Computer History Museum, joins John Hollar for a conversation about how to build a sustained creative culture, nurturing both the technical and artistic "poles of creativity."

Please join us for what is certain to be an inspiring evening with a true revolutionary.

We are pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping this program for broadcast on Thursday, May 22 at 8pm, and that Kepler’s Books will be on-site selling copies of Creativity, Inc. before and after tonight’s program.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Apr 10, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Game Changers: Sony Computer Entertainment's Shuhei Yoshida in Conversation with Mark Cerny
Game Changers: Sony Computer Entertainment's Shuhei Yoshida in Conversation with Mark Cerny
Shuhei Yoshida is President of Worldwide Studios at Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. (SCE). He has been with SCE since its inception and has been an integral part of the development of the PlayStation® family. Yoshida has overseen several successful product launches and was responsible for creating SCE's internal product development team. He was an executive producer for Gran Turismo™, and produced ICO, Ape Escape™, and The Legend of Dragoon®, among other popular titles.
Shuhei Yoshida is President of Worldwide Studios at Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. (SCE). He has been with SCE since its inception and has been an integral part of the development of the PlayStation® family. Yoshida has overseen several successful product launches and was responsible for creating SCE's internal product development team. He was an executive producer for Gran Turismo™, and produced ICO, Ape Escape™, and The Legend of Dragoon®, among other popular titles.

In March 2000, Yoshida moved to the US to oversee product development at Sony Computer Entertainment America (SCEA). In May 2008, Yoshida was appointed President of Worldwide Studios and is responsible for all first-party game software development activities for PlayStation® platforms, including 14 studios across the US, Europe, and Japan. To open the week of the much anticipated PlayStation®4 (PS4™) launch, SCEA released an official unboxing video of a PS4™ starring Yoshida. Throughout the video you only see a dark figure with coffee-brown colored leather gloves unwrap the contents of the box. At the very end of the video, Yoshida appears telling the audience, "Greatness Awaits."

Mark Cerny, a true veteran of the video game industry for over 30 years, has worked as a game designer, programmer, and producer of arcade and console games in both the US and Japan. In 2008, with Yoshida's advice, SCE asked Cerny to lead the design of the next generation console, the top selling PS4™. Yoshida's instinct paid off. PS4™ delivered the best launch ever in PlayStation® history, selling over 4.2 million worldwide as of December 28, 2013.

We’re pleased to welcome Mark Cerny back to our stage, this time in the moderator’s seat. As a result of their decades-long partnership and experience in the gaming industry, this is sure to be a compelling, in-depth conversation about Yoshida's early life and career path to SCE, their work together, the evolution of gaming software and hardware, and the state of the industry. Please join us.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be taping this program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Mar 27, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
The Art & Technology of Cirque du Soleil
The Art & Technology of Cirque du Soleil
From its beginnings 30 years ago as a group of 20 street performers, Cirque du Soleil is now a major Quebec-based organization providing high-quality artistic entertainment. The company has 5,000 employees, including more than 1,300 artists from more than 50 countries. It has brought wonder and delight to more than 100 million spectators in more than 300 cities in more than 40 countries on 6 continents.
From its beginnings 30 years ago as a group of 20 street performers, Cirque du Soleil is now a major Quebec-based organization providing high-quality artistic entertainment. The company has 5,000 employees, including more than 1,300 artists from more than 50 countries. It has brought wonder and delight to more than 100 million spectators in more than 300 cities in more than 40 countries on 6 continents.

Tonight our moderator, Will Travis, President of Sid Lee USA, will give the audience a glimpse into the technical “magic” driving their imaginative and daring programs. He’ll be joined by Cirque’s Director of Creation, Welby Altidor, and its Technical Director, Matthew Whelan.

They will also walk us through a case study to better illustrate their process—Michael Jackson ONE, a heartfelt tribute to the work, innovative spirit, and legacy of Michael Jackson in performance at Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. Technical elements of the show include a GPS tracking system equipped with sensors, 5,412 seat speakers, 26 projectors and 11 TV monitors, and a 40-ft-wide, 30-ft-high LED wall made up of 8 separate columns.

Cirque du Soleil’s mission is to invoke the imagination, provoke the senses, and evoke the emotions of people around the world. This is a rare look inside an imaginative organization that successfully blends daring artistry with cutting-edge technology.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be onsite taping the evening’s program for broadcast on Saturday, April 26 at 2pm.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Mar 12, 2014 2:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries:
Technion's President Peretz Lavie in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology was founded in 1912 in Haifa and is the oldest university in Israel and the Middle East. The university offers degrees in science and engineering, as well as related fields such as architecture, medicine, industrial management, and education.
This event highlights the Museum's ongoing commitment to showcasing computing history from around the world.

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology was founded in 1912 in Haifa and is the oldest university in Israel and the Middle East. The university offers degrees in science and engineering, as well as related fields such as architecture, medicine, industrial management, and education.

Israel is known as the "startup nation" and much of that drive and brainpower comes from the Technion, located in the northern city of Haifa. The fusion of academics and industry there has created a unique entrepreneurial fusion, much as it has here in Silicon Valley.

John Hollar will moderate a conversation with Professor Peretz Lavie, the Technion's 16th president. Along with Israel's penchant for innovation and entrepreneurship, they'll talk about the Technion's storied history, as well as Lavie's background and path to its presidency. Looking ahead, they'll discuss the Technion Cornell Innovation Institute, which will be located on Roosevelt Island in New York City.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Please note the special timing of this program –3PM– to accommodate the Professor’s travel schedule.
Mar 4, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries:
MLB Advanced Media's Robert A. Bowman in Conversation with Museum President & CEO John Hollar
Bob Bowman serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer of MLB Advanced Media, a position he has held since 2000.

Following Baseball Commissioner Allan H. (Bud) Selig’s recommendation in January 2000, professional baseball owners voted to centralize their collective internet and interactive media operations under one roof by building a technology company – MLBAM. Over its first 13 years guided by Bowman and his team, MLBAM’s developmental evolution and work in the interactive space has not only made it a model for building a successful and sustainable 21st Century digital media operation, but ultimately may define it as one of the great American business success stories.
"Major League Baseball Advanced Media – BAM, for short – is as technologically sophisticated as any company, anywhere."
– Fast Company

Bob Bowman serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer of MLB Advanced Media, a position he has held since 2000.

Following Baseball Commissioner Allan H. (Bud) Selig’s recommendation in January 2000, professional baseball owners voted to centralize their collective internet and interactive media operations under one roof by building a technology company – MLBAM. Over its first 13 years guided by Bowman and his team, MLBAM’s developmental evolution and work in the interactive space has not only made it a model for building a successful and sustainable 21st Century digital media operation, but ultimately may define it as one of the great American business success stories.

MLBAM, the largest New York born-and-bred technology company, has a proprietary multimedia ecosystem that is a one-of-a-kind graft of internet infrastructure and traditional television broadcasting. It is designed, built and managed internally for the acquisition, production and delivery of live and on-demand HD sports and non-sports content to millions of users. MLBAM supports dozens of partners for encoding and streaming more than 20,000 live events annually.

MLBAM: A Box Score

  • 8th Most Valuable Privately Owned Tech Company in the World (Business Insider)

  • 9th Most Valuable Global Sports Brand (Forbes)

  • 13 million visits to MLB.com per day during baseball season

  • 10th highest-grossing iOS app ever (MLB.com At Bat)

  • 10 million downloads of MLB.com At Bat in 2013 (+49% YOY)

  • 1.5 petabytes of live and on-demand baseball video content generated by MLBAM each season



Museum President & CEO John Hollar will conduct a play-by-play interview with Bowman about the path that led to MLBAM, and how with great leadership and deft political skills he was able to turn a fledgling startup into a multimedia powerhouse. Bowman’s vision for MLBAM always put technology at the forefront of the organization, and that vision and entrepreneurial spirit has made the baseball fan user experience second to none. It also means that the company is highly successful and constantly innovating and pushing technological limits. Join us for a riveting conversation with a revolutionary at the intersection of sports, business and technology.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be onsite taping the evening’s program for broadcast Thursday, April 3 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed speaker series, Revolutionaries. It features renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Mar 3, 2014 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries:
The New Digital Age: Authors Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen in Conversation with Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg
In an unparalleled collaboration, two leading global thinkers in technology and foreign affairs give us their widely anticipated, transformational vision of the future: a world where everyone is connected — a world full of challenges and benefits that are ours to meet and harness.
“At last, a brilliant guide book for the next century—what the future holds for entrepreneurs, revolutionaries, politicians, and ordinary citizens alike. Schmidt and Cohen offer a dazzling glimpse into how the new digital revolution is changing our lives. This book is the most insightful exploration of our future world I’ve ever read, and once I started reading I was simply unable to put it down.”

-Sir Richard Branson, founder and chairman, Virgin Group

In an unparalleled collaboration, two leading global thinkers in technology and foreign affairs give us their widely anticipated, transformational vision of the future: a world where everyone is connected — a world full of challenges and benefits that are ours to meet and harness.

Schmidt and Cohen traveled to more than 35 countries, including some of the world’s most volatile and repressive societies, where they met with political leaders, entrepreneurs, and activists to learn firsthand about the challenges they face. They tackle some of the most interesting questions about our future: how will technology change privacy and security, war and intervention, diplomacy, revolution and terrorism? How will technology improve our lives? What new disruptions can we expect?

Eric Schmidt is one of Silicon Valley’s great leaders, having taken Google from a small startup to one of the world’s most influential companies. Jared Cohen is the director of Google Ideas and a former adviser to Secretaries of State Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Clinton.

The New Digital Age's release in paperback – with a new afterward -- provided the spark for this program. We’re very pleased to host the authors and to welcome Sheryl Sandberg back to our stage, this time as moderator. Please join us for a thoughtful and provocative conversation about the promise and perils of the digital revolution, with these outstanding speakers.

We are very pleased that CSPAN Book TV will be taping this event for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Feb 20, 2014 6:00 PM Special Events
NextGen Advisory Board Presents
Ninja Innovation and Startup Culture
Fresh from his command performance at CES 2014, Consumer Electronics Association President and CEO Gary Shapiro joins moderator and tech evangelist Robert Scoble in a wide-ranging conversation about Gary’s New York Times bestseller, Ninja Innovation: The Ten Killer Strategies of the World's Most Successful Businesses.

Ninja Innovator [ˈninjə ˈinəˌvātər] noun
Leaders who exhibit the traits of ancient Japanese warriors: they are disciplined, determined and passionate, and willing...
Fresh from his command performance at CES 2014, Consumer Electronics Association President and CEO Gary Shapiro joins moderator and tech evangelist Robert Scoble in a wide-ranging conversation about Gary’s New York Times bestseller, Ninja Innovation: The Ten Killer Strategies of the World's Most Successful Businesses.

Ninja Innovator [ˈninjə ˈinəˌvātər] noun
Leaders who exhibit the traits of ancient Japanese warriors: they are disciplined, determined and passionate, and willing to take risks in order to succeed. Above all, modern Ninja Innovators understand that in today’s technology world, a successful startup must innovate or die!

In three decades leading the Consumer Electronics Association, Gary and his team have built CES into the must-see technology event of the year each January. In the meantime, he has learned important lessons about “ninja innovation”—disruption, determination, discipline and passion. In his book, he distills many of these lessons into important principles that work in any business setting. Many of those principles were on display this year when CES again featured startups and entrepreneurs at their "Eureka Park Tech Zone" -- now in its third year and growing exponentially.

In the latest in our “Future History Makers series,” Gary will share his knowledge and describe key emerging trends that are helping direct startup “ninja innovation” in this competitive landscape.

Come discover how you can find and develop your inner ninja!
Feb 18, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Cisco's Padmasree Warrior in Conversation with NPR's Laura Sydell
Padmasree Warrior is a true revolutionary. As a young woman she came to the U.S. to pursue her masters degree in chemical engineering at Cornell University with $100 in her pocket and a one-way plane ticket. Just over twenty years later, she’s one of Forbes “100 Most Powerful Women,” and Cisco CEO John Chambers says she’s among those at the top of the list to succeed him.
Padmasree Warrior is a true revolutionary. As a young woman she came to the U.S. to pursue her masters degree in chemical engineering at Cornell University with $100 in her pocket and a one-way plane ticket. Just over twenty years later, she’s one of Forbes “100 Most Powerful Women,” and Cisco CEO John Chambers says she’s among those at the top of the list to succeed him.

As Cisco’s Chief Technology & Strategy Officer, Padmasree Warrior is charged with aligning technology development and corporate strategy to enable Cisco to anticipate, shape, and lead major market transitions. She helps direct technology and operational innovation across the company and oversees strategic partnerships, mergers and acquisitions, the integration of new business models, the incubation of new technologies, and the cultivation of world-class technical talent.

In her previous role, Warrior served as Chief Technology Officer (CTO) and also co-led Cisco's worldwide engineering organization. As Senior Vice President, Engineering, she was responsible for core switching, collaboration, cloud computing and data center/virtualization, security, and architectures for business transformation.

Tonight NPR Correspondent Laura Sydell will moderate a wide-ranging conversation with a real revolutionary, Padmasree Warrior. Please join us.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be onsite taping this program for broadcast on Wednesday, March 5 at 8pm.
Feb 13, 2014 3:00 PM Special Events
How Do We Continue to Power Modern Civilization Without Destroying It? A Film Screening of Pandora's Promise
From time to time, the Computer History Musuem joins with partners from around the country to bring programming of special interest to our broad audiences. We are pleased to invite you to just such a program: a screening of Pandora’s Promise, an award-winning documentary by Academy Award® nominee Robert Stone. The film is presented in partnership with GW & Wade, LLC.

Please note that you’re also...
From time to time, the Computer History Musuem joins with partners from around the country to bring programming of special interest to our broad audiences. We are pleased to invite you to just such a program: a screening of Pandora’s Promise, an award-winning documentary by Academy Award® nominee Robert Stone. The film is presented in partnership with GW & Wade, LLC.

Please note that you’re also invited to the special post-screening conversation with Robert Stone, Michael Shellenberger, and Nobel Laureate Burton Richter, moderated by Museum advisory board member Ray Rothrock.

Names for the evening screening and reception wait list are being accepted.

The matinee showing has available tickets, please register at the link provided below.

If you have any questions regarding this event please contact our partner for this event Gene Sinclair at (650) 618-6323 or gsinclair@gwwade.com.
Feb 6, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Regis McKenna in Conversation with John Markoff
Regis McKenna founded his own high tech marketing firm, Regis McKenna, Inc., in Silicon Valley in 1970 after working in the marketing departments of two early semiconductor pioneering companies. Over the past 30 years, his firm evolved from one focused on high tech start ups to a broad based marketing strategy firm servicing international clients in many different industries and countries. McKenna retired from consulting in 2000 and is concentrating his efforts on high tech entrepreneurial seed-ventures.
Regis McKenna founded his own high tech marketing firm, Regis McKenna, Inc., in Silicon Valley in 1970 after working in the marketing departments of two early semiconductor pioneering companies. Over the past 30 years, his firm evolved from one focused on high tech start ups to a broad based marketing strategy firm servicing international clients in many different industries and countries. McKenna retired from consulting in 2000 and is concentrating his efforts on high tech entrepreneurial seed-ventures.

McKenna and his firm worked with a number of entrepreneurial start-ups during their formation years including: America Online, Apple, Compaq, Electronic Arts, Genentech, Intel, Linear Technology, Lotus, Microsoft, National Semiconductor, Silicon Graphics, 3COM, and many others. McKenna helped launch some of the most important technological innovations of the last thirty years including the first microprocessor (Intel Corporation), the first personal computer (Apple Computer), the first recombinant DNA genetically engineered product (Genentech, Inc.), and the first retail computer store (The Byte Shop). In the last decade, McKenna consulted on strategic marketing and business issues to industrial, consumer, transportation, healthcare, and financial firms in the United States, Japan, and Europe. McKenna continues to be involved in high tech start-up companies through his venture activities.

McKenna is included in the San Jose Mercury News' Millennium 100 as one of the 100 people who made Silicon Valley what it is today. McKenna has written and lectured extensively on the social and market effects of technological change advancing innovations in marketing theories and practices.

Our moderator is John Markoff of The New York Times, who will guide us through a fascinating conversation with a marketing mastermind.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Jan 9, 2014 12:00 PM Speaker Series
Computer History Museum and Commonwealth Club of SF Present
Telecommunications Policy: Remarks by new FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler
Tom Wheeler, the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission under President Obama, will appear for the first time in Silicon Valley to deliver remarks on his vision for national telecommunications policy. Wheeler became the 31st Chairman of the FCC on November 4.

For more than three decades, Chairman Wheeler has been involved with new telecommunications networks and services, experiencing the revolution...
Tom Wheeler, the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission under President Obama, will appear for the first time in Silicon Valley to deliver remarks on his vision for national telecommunications policy. Wheeler became the 31st Chairman of the FCC on November 4.

For more than three decades, Chairman Wheeler has been involved with new telecommunications networks and services, experiencing the revolution in telecommunications as a policy expert, an advocate, and a businessman. The FCC’s approach to regulation, technology innovation and market growth is of critical importance to Silicon Valley and the nation, and this will be the first opportunity for West Coast audiences to hear from Chairman Wheeler personally since his confirmation.

Following Chairman Wheeler's remarks he will sit for a Q&A session with Museum President & CEO, John Hollar.

If you are with the media and wish to attend this event, please contact Carina Sweet, csweet@computerhistory.org.

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2013 Events

Dec 14, 2013 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Event
The Hour of Code!
Code for an Hour!
This year, on December 14, we will participate in The Hour of Code, a national campaign sponsored by code.org, which will introduce the creativity, excitement, and fun of computer programming for everyone. From 10am to 4pm, visitors will be able to try their hand at a variety of self-guided tutorials that can be done on any device by anybody, from students to seniors. No experience necessary!
Today, history is being made by technologies that are transforming the way we work, live, learn, and play. We use these every day, but very few of us know how to write the programs that make them work.

On December 14, the Museum will participate in The Hour of Code, a worldwide campaign sponsored by code.org, to introduce the creativity, excitement, and fun of computer programming to everyone. From 10am to 4pm, visitors can try their hand at self-guided tutorials that can be done on any device by anybody, from students to seniors. No experience necessary! Bring your own tablet or mobile device or use one of our laptops. We’ll have everything you need to learn the basics of computer programming … in just an hour!

About The Hour of Code:
The Hour of Code is part of Computer Science Education week (December 9-15), developed by code.org to celebrate the birthday of Grace Murray Hopper. Hopper was one of the first women engineers, a developer of the COBOL programming language, and a 1987 Fellow of the Museum. Learn more about her at computerhistory.org/fellowawards/hall/bios/Grace,Hopper/. Code.org is a non-profit dedicated to expanding computer science education, especially for women and underrepresented students of color.

For more information visit code.org
Dec 11, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
OSTP's Director John P. Holdren with John Markoff of The New York Times
OSTP's Director John P. Holdren with John Markoff of The New York Times
This event is part of the Museum's Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
"Whether it’s improving our health or harnessing clean energy, protecting our security or succeeding in the global economy, our future depends on reaffirming America’s role as the world’s engine of scientific discovery and technological innovation."
-President Barack Obama

Dr. John P. Holdren is Assistant to the President for Science and Technology, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), and Co-Chair of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST).

Congress established the Office of Science and Technology Policy in 1976 with a broad mandate to advise the President and others within the Executive Office of the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The 1976 Act also authorizes OSTP to lead interagency efforts to develop and implement sound science and technology policies and budgets, and to work with the private sector, state and local governments, the science and higher education communities, and other nations toward this end.

We are very pleased to welcome Dr. Holdren and our moderator, John Markoff, the Pulitzer prize winning senior writer of The New York Times science section. Tonight we will learn more about the Director and his mandate, as well as many of the initiatives the OSTP has put in place.

Please join us.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping tonight's program and will broadcast it Wednesday, January 8 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum's Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Dec 9, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Technology Legend: Honoring Douglas Engelbart
Honoring Douglas Engelbart
Join us for an evening of celebrating his achievements, and of challenging some of today’s pivotal leaders to think about how his unfinished revolution may be useful going forward.
As a young Doug Engelbart could only imagine sixty years ago, much of the world’s population does the bulk of its reading, writing, and research tasks online. We sit at interactive screens, just as he foresaw, and click on the hypertext links he developed, with the mouse he invented. We chat and send emails, as his Augmentation Research Center staff did in the 1960s. We meet in videoconferences, the technology they showed the world at a famous 1968 public demo. We do all of this over computer networks including the Internet, both partly developed within his laboratory at SRI.

But when it comes to the kind of knowledge navigation and collaboration tools that were the heart of Engelbart’s oNLine System (NLS), we’ve climbed only the first rung of the ladder. And when it comes to the ambitious goal that drove him to build all his technology – to augment human intelligence so that we might better address the world’s big problems – we’ve barely even stepped off the ground. What can we learn today from this great inventor, whose idea of iterative “bootstrapping” anticipated the promises of the Singularity but with a human face – no machine intelligence required?

Join us for an evening of celebrating his achievements, and of challenging some of today’s pivotal leaders to think about how his unfinished revolution may be useful going forward. December 9 will be the 45th Anniversary of the “Mother of All Demos.”Douglas Engelbart died on July 2 this year. Some of the main records of his laboratory at SRI are in the Museum’s collection, and form a crucial part of the CHM Internet History Program. The Douglas Engelbart Memorial Fund helps support preservation and access for these materials.
Dec 7, 2013 10:00 AM Special Events
Members Only Event
Member Appreciation Day
As a special thank you to our loyal members, the Computer History Museum is hosting its Annual Member Day celebration! Friends unite for a one-stop shopping experience in our Museum Store, and what better timing than right before the holidays. Find favorite gadgets, hundreds of books, geeky apparel, unique jewelry, games and receive 25% off everything. The day will also include...

--Unlimited guests! Members can...
As a special thank you to our loyal members, the Computer History Museum is hosting its Annual Member Day celebration! Friends unite for a one-stop shopping experience in our Museum Store, and what better timing than right before the holidays. Find favorite gadgets, hundreds of books, geeky apparel, unique jewelry, games and receive 25% off everything. The day will also include...

--Unlimited guests! Members can bring in any number of guests and they too will receive free admission to the Museum.
--Member and guests enjoy some holiday goodies. 10 am to 11:30 am.
--Holiday Sing-a-long with the PDP-1. Enjoy a chance to sing holiday favorites with other Museum enthusiasts while accompanied by DEC’s PDP-1 computer.

If you are unable to join us on Saturday, December 7 you may preview and select items in our Museum Store 3 days prior to the event. We will hold your items with your credit card number, and will ring up the purchase on Saturday, December 7. You can pick up your purchase during our regular store hours beginning Sunday, December 8 – Saturday, December 14. Questions? Email the Museum Store Manager, Sandra Shu-Lee, or call her at (650) 810-1031.

If you have any questions about the Member Appreciation Day please email membership@computerhistory.org.


We look forward to seeing you!
Nov 20, 2013 10:00 AM Special Events
Members Only Event
IBM 1401 Demo Lab: Member Preview
Please join us for a special celebration of the Computer History Museum’s latest visitor experience: IBM 1401 Demo Lab. This invitation is for Museum members and their guests to join us on Wednesday, November 20, for a reception and private demonstration as we open the IBM 1401 Demo Lab.

The IBM 1401 Demo Lab represents a new era in the Museum’s continued growth. Through generous...
Please join us for a special celebration of the Computer History Museum’s latest visitor experience: IBM 1401 Demo Lab. This invitation is for Museum members and their guests to join us on Wednesday, November 20, for a reception and private demonstration as we open the IBM 1401 Demo Lab.

The IBM 1401 Demo Lab represents a new era in the Museum’s continued growth. Through generous contributions from Museum members, trustees, volunteers, private donors and IBM, we have expanded the former 1401 restoration area into a full-on Lab that will now be fully exhibited to the public for the first time. The Lab houses two restored IBM 1401 mainframe systems that have only been available for private access until now.

We hope you’ll join us —to meet the restoration teams, see the new space and celebrate a special era in computer history.

The 1401 Demo Lab will be open to the public starting November 20th. Public demonstrations will be held Wednesday at 3pm.
Nov 18, 2013 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Smithsonian's History of America in 101 Objects: Author Richard Kurin in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
The Smithsonian's History of America in 101 Objects: Author Richard Kurin in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Please join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates a conversation with Dr. Kurin about the genesis of the book and the journey he took in pulling it together, and the surprises he encountered along the way.
The Smithsonian Institution is America's largest, most important, and most beloved repository for the objects that define our common heritage. Now Under Secretary for Art, History, and Culture Richard Kurin, aided by a team of top Smithsonian curators and scholars, has assembled a literary exhibition of 101 objects from across the Smithsonian's museums that together offer a marvelous new perspective on the history of the United States.

Ranging from the earliest years of the pre-Columbian continent to the Digital Age, and from the American Revolution to Vietnam, each entry pairs the fascinating history surrounding each object with the story of its creation or discovery and the place it has come to occupy in our national memory. Kurin sheds remarkable new light on objects we think we know well, from Lincoln's hat to Dorothy's ruby slippers and Julia Child's kitchen, including the often astonishing tales of how each made its way into the collections of the Smithsonian. Other objects will be eye-opening new discoveries for many, but no less evocative of the most poignant and important moments of the American experience. Some objects, such as Harriet Tubman's hymnal, Sitting Bull's ledger, Cesar Chavez's union jacket, and the Enola Gay bomber, tell difficult stories from the nation's history, and inspire controversies when exhibited at the Smithsonian. Others, from George Washington's sword to the space shuttle Discovery, celebrate the richness and vitality of the American spirit. In Kurin's hands, each object comes to vivid life, providing a tactile connection to American history.

Please join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates a conversation with Dr. Kurin about this remarkable book.

We are very pleased that Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of Dr. Kurin's book before and after the program.
Oct 27, 2013 2:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
A Special Screening of 10x10's Girl Rising: Educate Girls, Change the World
The Computer History Museum is proud to host this special screening of Girl Rising. Intel Corporation is the film’s Strategic Action Partner, and Intel’s Vice President and CMO, Deborah Conrad, will introduce the film. Following the screening, Museum CEO John Hollar will have a conversation about making the film with its Senior Producer and Creative Director, Martha Adams.
"This film gives visual corroboration to knowledge we already have: Educating women and girls has the most optimistic, positive effects on families, communities, and economies worldwide. If to see it is to know it, this film delivers hope; reasonable, measurable, tangible hope that the world can be healed and helped to a better future!"
- Meryl Streep

One Girl with Courage is a Revolution. Girl Rising, a groundbreaking film directed by Academy Award nominee Richard Robbins, tells the stories of 9 extraordinary girls from 9 countries, written by 9 celebrated writers and narrated by 9 renowned actresses. Girl Rising showcases the strength of the human spirit and the power of education to change the world.

The Computer History Museum is proud to host this special screening of Girl Rising. Intel Corporation is the film’s Strategic Action Partner, and Intel’s Vice President and CMO, Deborah Conrad, will introduce the film. Following the screening, Museum CEO John Hollar will have a conversation about making the film with its Senior Producer and Creative Director, Martha Adams.

Please join us, and prepare to be inspired! Note that this film is rated PG-13 – Parents Strongly Cautioned. Some Material May Be Inappropriate for Children Under 13. Thematic material
Oct 25, 2013 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Deus Ex Machina
IBM Fellow Grady Booch on Computing: The Human Experience
This presentation is the next in our series for Computing: The Human Experience. No matter your individual position on the matter, it is a reality that faith is a powerful element of the human experience, and so it comes as no surprise that computing intersects with the story of belief in many profound ways. In this lecture, we will examine several of these stories, leading to an understanding in how different faith traditions have reacted to and in some ways contributed to the advance of computing. From Pope Benedict’s blessing via Twitter to the growth of the Digital Sabbath movement, from the technology-driven exegesis of the Dead Sea Scrolls to the rise of the virtual church, computing has impacted the ways we believe and the means by which some make their faith manifest.
I have made things clear to some extent by the origin of numbers from 0 and 1, which I have observed is the most beautiful symbol of the continuous creation of things from nothing and of their dependence on God.
- Gottfried Leibniz

In the days in which mainframes ruled the earth, there walked among us a programming priesthood. Just like the monks of old who would studiously labor over the production of their elegant manuscripts, programmers would do likewise. Each character, each line was important and so required their utmost concentration and the perfection of form. Their work completed, they would cautiously carry their precious cards to the sacred place of computation and hand their offerings to intermediaries locked away in their cold, sterile rooms. The members of this programming priesthood would in turn submit those gifts to their waiting machines, all hoping that they had carried out their rituals just right. If the machines were indeed well pleased, they would signal their reply with precise although not necessarily useful answers; if displeased, they would offer curious divinations, requiring hours of study to decipher before the ritual could begin again.

The coming of the minicomputer and then the personal computer brought an abrupt end to this curious period of computing, in a fashion not unlike Martin Luther’s subversive declarations that similarly broke the stranglehold of the church in the Middle Ages. And therein lies a story: does technology liberate the individual or does it make us a servant to the machines we ourselves create? Does computing contribute to our spiritual well-being or does it disrupt it by encouraging an interrupt-driven life that is filled with the noise of digital ephemera?

This presentation is the next in our series for Computing: The Human Experience. No matter your individual position on the matter, it is a reality that faith is a powerful element of the human experience, and so it comes as no surprise that computing intersects with the story of belief in many profound ways. In this lecture, we will examine several of these stories, leading to an understanding in how different faith traditions have reacted to and in some ways contributed to the advance of computing. From Pope Benedict’s blessing via Twitter to the growth of the Digital Sabbath movement, from the technology-driven exegesis of the Dead Sea Scrolls to the rise of the virtual church, computing has impacted the ways we believe and the means by which some make their faith manifest.

Belief systems came into being in part as a means of explaining the unexplainable, but along the way gave rise to important traditions that contributed to the advance of humanity in a number of unexpected ways. Yet, computing has been important tool in pushing back the edges of what we know we do not know, and so just as it has been with all technology, it is both a threat as well as an aid to faith. There’s even more: at the confluence of computing and physics, there are some who have proposed a very different kind of creation story for a fully digital universe, and so we are led to ask if there is even a deeper spiritual mystery that awaits us.
Oct 23, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Game Changers: Trip Hawkins with the New York Times' John Markoff
Game Changers: Trip Hawkins with the New York Times' John Markoff
This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Trip Hawkins is a Game Changer and a Revolutionary, who considered interactive games to be a new art form and their creators, artists. He founded Electronic Arts, 3DO and Digital Chocolate. He is also a Hall of Fame game industry and digital media consultant.

We are extremely pleased to welcome this gaming industry pioneer to our stage for a conversation with the New York Times’ John Markoff. They’ll talk about everything from his early days at Apple working for Steve Jobs, to founding Electronic Arts thirty years ago to 3DO and Digital Chocolate. He’s also on the board of Extreme Reality, a 3D gesturing company. What are his thoughts about how the gaming industry has evolved, the state of gaming today and how 3D technologies may change the ways we interact with devices. Please join us.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping this event for broadcast Wednesday, October 30 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Oct 8, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
An Evening with Intel's Justin Rattner
An Evening with Intel's Justin Rattner
This event is part of the Computer History Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Justin Rattner is an Intel Senior Fellow. He was Intel's Chief Technology Officer (CTO) and director of Intel Labs from 2006-2013 where he directed Intel's global research efforts in processors, programming, systems, security, communications and, most recently, user experience and interaction. As part of Intel Labs, Rattner was also responsible for funding academic research worldwide through its Science and Technology Centers, international research institutes, and individual faculty awards. Rattner joined Intel in 1973. He was named its first Principal Engineer in 1979 and its fourth Intel Fellow in 1988.

This is another event in a series designed to give our audiences unique insight into the remarkable work being done in our research labs around the world – a celebration of innovation. We hope you’ll join us for another compelling conversation about innovation in our research labs, moderated by Museum CEO John Hollar.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping tonight's event for broadcast on Wednesday, November 20 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Computer History Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Aug 27, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
America's Cup Comes to San Francisco: Technology Under Sail
America's Cup Comes to San Francisco: Technology Under Sail
This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
This is the 2013 "Summer of Racing" with some of the most sophisticated technology ever deployed in both America’s Cup racing and for the televised coverage of the race itself. The Museum is excited to host this special panel just before the America’s Cup finals in September. Our guests include Tom Ehman, Vice Commodore of the Golden Gate Yacht Club and Executive Director, America’s Cup Properties, Jimmy Spithill, Helmsman and Skipper of Oracle Team USA Racing, and the man behind the technology driving the race, Stan Honey, Director of Technology, America's Cup Event Authority.

We will learn about the challenges inherent in televising sailing and how those challenges were overcome with Stan Honey and his "A-Team." Honey, who invented the virtual first-down line for the NFL and strike-zone tracking for MLB (winning Emmys for both), will talk about the augmented reality system he is created for sailing, LiveLine, which helps distinguish who is in the lead, between-boat distances and other data to help viewers more easily follow the competition.

We will learn more about the technology deployed in the command center, the boats and on board the helicopters following the boats. Ehman and Spithill are both America's Cup veterans and will bring their own unique perspectives to the conversation.

John Hollar is our intrepid moderator and up for the challenge of navigating an exciting and educational conversation with some world-class sailors. We are certain that after attending you will be energized about watching the America's Cup finals – either in person or on television!

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping this event for broadcast Thursday, August 29 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Aug 8, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
An Evening with Qualcomm's Dr. Paul E. Jacobs
An Evening with Qualcomm's Dr. Paul E. Jacobs
This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Dr. Paul E. Jacobs is chairman of Qualcomm’s board of directors and the Company’s chief executive officer. A leader in the field of mobile communications for over two decades and a key architect of Qualcomm’s strategic vision, Dr. Jacobs is responsible for leadership and oversight of all the Company’s initiatives and operations.

He’ll join the Museum’s CEO John Hollar for a wide-ranging conversation about his beginnings, his path to Qualcomm and his vision for the company and for wireless. Additionally they’ll discuss Jacobs’ dedication to influencing U.S. broadband public policy, as well as his service to the World Economic Forum and the UN’s Broadband Commission for Digital Development.

Please join us for a thought-provoking conversation.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping this event for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Jul 16, 2013 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Totalisator - An Algorithm that Led to an Industry
Before the advent of computers, special-purpose hardware was used to solve computational problems. For the pari-mutuel system of gambling the main problem was keeping accurate totals of the bets placed on each horse in a race, and the grand total of all bets, in the frenzied half hour before the race, when, at the larger racecourses, tens of thousands of bets would be placed...
Before the advent of computers, special-purpose hardware was used to solve computational problems. For the pari-mutuel system of gambling the main problem was keeping accurate totals of the bets placed on each horse in a race, and the grand total of all bets, in the frenzied half hour before the race, when, at the larger racecourses, tens of thousands of bets would be placed at 100s of betting booths. Mechanical solutions to this problem were pioneered by Sir George Julius who formed the company Automatic Totalisators Ltd., operating from Sydney, Australia. Indeed, this year is the centenary of Julius' first machine which was set operating in Auckland, New Zealand in 1913.

Please join Bob Doran, Emeritus Professor of Computer Science at the University of Auckland, for a presentation on the history of a little-known application of large-scale mechanical calculating machines – the horse track betting machines pioneered by Sir George Julius a century ago.

Doran will also touch on the origins of the Pari-mutuel system, devised by Joseph Oller in the 1860s. Then the first generation of simple machines that started in the 1880s and the course-wide manual systems that were used well into the 20th century. Then he will look at Julius's first machine, its "Principles of Operation", and how it was developed into a reliable product that was widely used in the 1920s, culminating with the truly giant Longchamp totalisator installed in Paris in 1927 which had 293 on-line ticket-selling machines. He will also summarize some of the further developments, including dividend prediction, that took place over the years until the special-purpose machines were phased-out in the 1970s.
Jun 11, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
An Evening with IBM Research's Dr. John Kelly
Revolutionaries is the Museum's acclaimed speaker series distributed throughout the world on multiple platforms. It features renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

Tonight’s event is another in our series celebrating innovation at our research labs. Please join us.
Dr. John E. Kelly III is senior vice president and director of IBM Research. In this position he directs the worldwide operations of IBM Research, with approximately 3,000 scientists and technical employees at 12 laboratories in 10 countries around the world, and helps guide IBM’s overall technical strategy.

Dr. Kelly’s top priorities as head of IBM Research are to stimulate innovation in key areas of information technology, and quickly bring those innovations into the marketplace to sustain and grow IBM’s existing business; to create the new businesses of IBM’s future, and to apply these innovations to help IBM clients succeed.

IBM Research breakthroughs have helped to create and shape the world’s computing industry, while more recent breakthroughs, including Deep Blue computing systems, breaking the Petaflop barrier, and the introduction of Watson, the deep question answering natural-language computer system, are blazing the computing trails of the future.

Museum CEO John Hollar will moderate a fascinating conversation with Kelly on topics ranging from his background and the path that led him to IBM, the history of research there, IBM’s Watson and cognitive computing, to the newest lab in Nairobi, Kenya. Africa, IBM says, is destined to become an important growth market for the company. “Africa is a complex place,” Dr. Kelly said. "But we feel it is on the cusp, at an inflection point. It’s going to take off."

Revolutionaries is the Museum's acclaimed speaker series distributed throughout the world on multiple platforms. It features renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

Tonight’s event is another in our series celebrating innovation at our research labs. Please join us.
May 22, 2013 8:30 AM Speaker Series
Ethernet Innovation Summit Day Conference
Inspired by 40 Years of Ethernet Innovation
Ethernet Innovation Summit: Inspired by 40 Years of Ethernet Innovation
May 22nd 1973 was the day the Ethernet concept was first outlined in a memo from the young Bob Metcalfe at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) and, forty years on, this key moment in the history of human communications is being celebrated in the form of a two day Ethernet Innovation Summit looking at past, present and future innovations in networking. Tickets: $375 per person.
NetEvents is producing a fantastic event at the Computer History Museum to celebrate 40 years of Ethernet Innovation, take a look and book online now.

Ethernet Innovation Summit (May 22nd - Day):

Organized by PARC at Silicon Valley’s famous Computer History Museum. A great line-up of industry speakers from the "Ethernet Inventors" to future "Innovations in Networking." Meet Ethernet inventors Bob Metcalfe, Dave Boggs and other networking visionaries, pioneers and drivers and hear how todays innovations impact tomorrow business.

The cost to attend the day summit is $375 per person.

For a detailed agenda visit http://www.netevents.org.uk/ethernet-innovation-conference.

Computer History Museum members get 50% discount for the conference day pass!
Enter the code NE13EIS when registering.
May 22, 2013 6:30 PM Speaker Series
Ethernet 40th Birthday Party Celebrations
Ethernet Innovation Summit Evening
Ethernet 40th Birthday Party Celebrations and Charity Auction Awards Dinner (May 22nd - Evening):

“Ethernet Idol” Innovation Awards: From a short list of the industry’s most innovative and dynamic contenders, a team of analysts and IT industry gurus have eliminated all but their top three contestants. The three finalists will each make a brief presentation to the assembled dinner guests before a select panel of...
Ethernet 40th Birthday Party Celebrations and Charity Auction Awards Dinner (May 22nd - Evening):

“Ethernet Idol” Innovation Awards: From a short list of the industry’s most innovative and dynamic contenders, a team of analysts and IT industry gurus have eliminated all but their top three contestants. The three finalists will each make a brief presentation to the assembled dinner guests before a select panel of judges including representatives from PARC.

Celebrity auction in aid of STEM Education: We need more students that excel in science, math, technology and engineering to become contributors to the global technology marketplace. High-tech companies have vacancies due to a lack of qualified candidates, and the demand for scientists and mathematicians is projected to grow dramatically. Over 50% of US 8th graders receive instruction from a science and math teacher without a relevant degree or real world experience to inspire their students.

The Computer History Museum, as a 2012 STEM Innovation Award Winner, and HP Catalyst Initiative participant, is proud to raise money for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education by hosting tonight’s Ethernet Celebrity Auction.

Bids will help educate tomorrow’s innovators.
May 15, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Chroniclers of Technology: An Evening with David Kirkpatrick, Steven Levy & John Markoff
Chroniclers of Technology: An Evening with David Kirkpatrick, Steven Levy & John Markoff
Kirkpatrick, Levy and Markoff will take the stage with moderator John Hollar, to tell their personal versions of history gleaned from three decades covering one of the most riveting journalism beats on the planet.
David Kirkpatrick, Steven Levy and John Markoff are three of the most prolific tech writers in the country and have been friends for almost 30 years. Levy is a senior writer for Wired Magazine and the author of seven books, many of them bestsellers, on everything from computer hackers and cryptography to the inside stories of the iPod’s invention and Google’s birth. Kirkpatrick, long-time Fortune Magazine writer and now chairman of the Techonomy conferences, wrote the behind-the-scenes story of Facebook’s founding and explosive growth in the bestselling book "The Facebook Effect." Markoff, a senior writer for The New York Times, began writing about technology in 1976 and joined the Times in 1988.

Kirkpatrick, Levy and Markoff will take the stage with moderator John Hollar to tell their personal versions of history gleaned from three decades covering one of the most riveting journalism beats on the planet.

We are very pleased that KQED FM will be onsite taping this event for broadcast Wednesday, May 22 at 8pm.

Revolutionaries is the Museum's acclaimed speaker series distributed throughout the world on multiple platforms. It features renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
May 8, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead. Author Sheryl Sandberg in Conversation with Google's Eric Schmidt
Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead.
This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
For the past five years, I've sat at a desk next to Sheryl and I've learned something from her almost every day. She has a remarkable intelligence that can cut through complex processes and find solutions to the hardest problems. Lean In combines Sheryl’s ability to synthesize information with her understanding of how to get the best out of people. The book is smart and honest and funny. Her words will help all readers—especially men—to become better and more effective leaders.
- Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO, Facebook


Thirty years after women became 50 percent of the college graduates in the United States, men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in government and industry. This means that women’s voices are still not heard equally in the decisions that most affect our lives. In Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg examines why women's progress in achieving leadership roles has stalled, explains the root causes, and offers compelling, commonsense solutions that can empower women to achieve their full potential.

Sandberg is the chief operating officer of Facebook and is ranked on Fortune’s list of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Business and as one of Time's 100 Most Influential People in the World. In 2010, she gave an electrifying TEDTalk in which she described how women unintentionally hold themselves back in their careers. Her talk, which became a phenomenon and has been viewed more than two million times, encouraged women to "sit at the table," seek challenges, take risks, and pursue their goals with gusto.

Join Google's Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt as he moderates what is certain to be a fascinating conversation with Sandberg about women, leadership and so much more.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

We are very pleased that our partner Kepler's Books will be onsite before and after this event selling copies of Lean In.

And, we are very pleased that CSPAN Book TV will be onsite taping this event for future broadcast.
Apr 29, 2013 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Martian's Daughter: A Memoir. Author Marina von Neumann Whitman in conversation with John Hollar
The Martian's Daughter: A Memoir.  Author Marina von Neumann Whitman in conversation with John Hollar
Join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates a conversation with Whitman about her life with her father and her remarkable rise to become the first or highest-ranking woman in a variety of areas he unfortunately did not live to see.
"How did a young Hungarian immigrant and his daughter both become leading advisors to Presidents of the United States? This richly detailed memoir not only illuminates Marina von Neumann Whitman's ground-breaking life, but sheds long-awaited new light on her father, bringing us as close as we may ever get to the autobiography that John von Neumann never had the chance to write."
—George Dyson,
author of Darwin Among the Machines,
Project Orion, and Turing's Cathedral


One of the five Hungarian scientific geniuses dubbed "the Martians" by their colleagues, John von Neumann is often hailed as the greatest mathematician of the twentieth century and even as the greatest scientist after Einstein. He was a key figure in the Manhattan Project; the inventor of game theory; the pioneer developer of the modern stored-program electronic computer; and an adviser to the top echelons of the American military establishment. In The Martian's Daughter, Marina von Neumann Whitman reveals intimate details about the famed scientist and explores how the cosmopolitan environment in which she was immersed, the demanding expectations of her parents, and her own struggles to emerge from the shadow of a larger-than-life parent shaped her life and work.

Join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates a conversation with Whitman about her life with her father and her remarkable rise to become the first or highest-ranking woman in a variety of areas he unfortunately did not live to see.

The Computer History Museum is honored to host Marina von Neumann Whitman.

We are also very pleased that our partner, Kepler's, will be onsite selling copies of the Martian's Daughter before and after the program.

And, we are very pleased that C-SPAN Book TV will be onsite taping this event for future broadcast.
Apr 20, 2013 10:00 AM Special Events
CHM Presents
Hack the Future
Hack the Future is an all-day party / hackathon to show you what it's like to be a hacker and see if it's for you. We won't tell you what to do. You'll be free to work on whatever you want. We'll try to keep you from getting stuck, and we'll give you a place to start (if you want one). This is a unique opportunity to learn the state of the art in software and hardware design and engineering from mentors in Bay Area startups and companies like Facebook and Microsoft.
Are you a 5th-12th grade student who wants to learn about building stuff with computers and electronics than they teach you in school? Then it's time to start teaching yourself!

Hack the Future is an all-day party / hackathon to show you what it's like to be a hacker and see if it's for you. We won't tell you what to do. You'll be free to work on whatever you want. We'll try to keep you from getting stuck, and we'll give you a place to start (if you want one). This is a unique opportunity to learn the state of the art in software and hardware design and engineering from mentors in Bay Area startups and companies like Facebook and Microsoft.

Parents, don't reserve a ticket for yourself. We encourage you to let your children learn on their own!

We'll be serving snacks and beverages throughout the day, and we’ll also serve lunch. Every young hacker gets a one-of-a-kind Hack the Future 7 t-shirt with the awesome art shown, screen printed beautifully just for this event. Please remember that all young hackers should bring a laptop! Don’t leave home without one.
Apr 17, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Innovating the Future: SRI's Curt Carlson and Bill Mark in Conversation with John Markoff of The New York Times
Innovating the Future: SRI's Curt Carlson and Bill Mark in Conversation with John Markoff of The New York Times
This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
SRI International’s pioneering contributions to computing are legendary, from the invention of the computer mouse and interactive computing in the 1960s, to the first internetworked and wireless connections in the 1970s. Fast-forward to 2010, when SRI created the first-generation virtual personal assistant and sold Siri to Apple.

Over 66 years, SRI has conducted billions of dollars of R&D and has created enormous value through spin-off ventures such as Nuance and Intuitive Surgical. Other innovations include new cancer drugs, digital math curriculum to help students break through algebra and move on to higher math, and much more. How does SRI do it, while many powerhouse corporate research labs have disappeared?

John Markoff of The New York Times will explore SRI, beginning with a conversation with William Mark, Vice President of Information and Computing Sciences. Hear what Mark and his researchers are imagining and turning into reality: from virtual personal assistants capable of human-like dialogue, to next-generation textbooks that use artificial intelligence, and human-machine interfaces that anticipate your moves.

To learn how SRI moves its research from the laboratory into the marketplace, they will be joined on stage by SRI’s President and CEO Curt Carlson. Carlson will offer a unique definition of innovation and discuss its importance in government policy, education, and U.S. competitiveness.

We hope you’ll join us for another compelling conversation led by John Markoff, who is our moderator-in-chief for this track examining and celebrating innovation at research labs.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

We are very pleased that KQED FM will be onsite taping this event for broadcast Wednesday, April 24 at 8pm.

And, we are also pleased that CSPAN will be onsite taping this event for future broadcast.
Mar 14, 2013 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America Author Ernest Freeberg in conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar