Past Events

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2014 Events

Oct 14, 2014 7:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
The Innovators Author Walter Isaacson in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
The Innovators Author Walter Isaacson in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Join John Hollar for an in-depth conversation with Isaacson on this new book, which continues his exploration of innovation and genius, from Jobs to Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein. We are very pleased to welcome Walter Isaacson back to our stage.
The Innovators: How a Group of Inventors, Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution

Following his biography of Steve Jobs, award-winning author Walter Isaacson became fascinated with other compelling stories of the men and women who have led the global revolution of the Information Age. The Innovators is his revealing account of the revolutionaries who created the computer and the Internet, yet it begins in Victorian England. It is destined to be a standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens.

Isaacson asks: What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs—but not others—to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail? Isaacson begins with Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s daughter, who pioneered computer programming in the 1840s. He explores the fascinating personalities that created the digital revolution, including Vannevar Bush, Alan Turing, John von Neumann, J.C.R. Licklider, Doug Engelbart, Robert Noyce, Bill Gates, Steve Wozniak, Steve Jobs, Tim Berners-Lee, and Larry Page. In his typically energetic and insightful style, Isaacson goes behind the scenes to explore how their minds worked and what made them so inventive. It’s also a narrative of how these innovators’ abilities to collaborate and master the art of teamwork made them even more creative.

Join John Hollar for an in-depth conversation with Isaacson on this new book, which continues his exploration of innovation and genius, from Jobs to Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein. We are very pleased to welcome Walter Isaacson back to our stage.

Kepler's Books will be on-site selling copies of The Innovators before and after the program.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be recording tonight's program for future broadcast.

And, CSPAN Book TV is going to be on-site recording the program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Oct 11, 2014 8:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build I
Design_Code_Build I
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a daylong education program put on by the Computer History Museum. Each event is filled with activities that explore the basics of computer programming, from concept to coding. Students will meet inspiring tech industry “rock stars,” build their own working computers using a Raspberry Pi, and investigate how programming was done in the past. The day will end with creative group presentations in which students will showcase the concepts and skills they have learned.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a daylong education program put on by the Computer History Museum. Each event is filled with activities that explore the basics of computer programming, from concept to coding. Students will meet inspiring tech industry “rock stars,” build their own working computers using a Raspberry Pi, and investigate how programming was done in the past. The day will end with creative group presentations in which students will showcase the concepts and skills they have learned.

Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.

About Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events put on by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and working with Museum docents to investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.

Oct 8, 2014 5:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
How Google Works: Authors Eric Schmidt & Jonathan Rosenberg in Conversation with Yahoo's Marissa Mayer
How Google Works: Authors Eric Schmidt & Jonathan Rosenberg in Conversation with Yahoo's Marissa Mayer
Google Executive Chairman and ex-CEO Eric Schmidt and former SVP of Products Jonathan Rosenberg came to Google over a decade ago as proven technology executives. At the time, the company was already well-known for doing things differently, reflecting the visionary— and frequently contrarian—principles of founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. If Eric and Jonathan were going to succeed, they realized they would have to relearn everything they thought they knew about management and business.
Google Executive Chairman and ex-CEO Eric Schmidt and former SVP of Products Jonathan Rosenberg came to Google over a decade ago as proven technology executives. At the time, the company was already well-known for doing things differently, reflecting the visionary— and frequently contrarian—principles of founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. If Eric and Jonathan were going to succeed, they realized they would have to relearn everything they thought they knew about management and business.

In their new book, "How Google Works," Schmidt and Rosenberg pull back the curtain on the company that has changed the way we work and redefined what it takes to be successful in today’s business environment. The authors offer unprecedented access to Google's practices and the philosophies that define its unique culture, values and strategies.

Our moderator tonight, Marissa Mayer, knows a bit about how Google works, as she spent 13 years there, holding numerous positions including engineer, designer, product manager and executive, before departing to become President and CEO of Yahoo.

We are so pleased to welcome all three to our stage and invite you to join us for a "master class" in leadership and an inside look at an iconic company.

Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of "How Google Works" before and after the program.

KQED Radio will be recording this program for future broadcast.

And, CSPAN Book TV will be on-site recording this program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success. Please note the Program start time – to accommodate the speakers' schedules.
Oct 3, 2014 6:00 PM Special Events
CHM Presents Revolutionaries on the Road
An Evening with Entrepreneur & Philanthropist Steve Case
Invitation Only Event
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries on the Road
Museum CEO John Hollar will lead an in-depth conversation with Steve about his early life in Hawaii, how his passion for starting companies and for supporting entrepreneurs developed, his roller-coaster ride at the top of AOL, his work in the public policy arena and his philanthropic endeavors. They will also discuss his "Rise of the Rest" campaign and tour, giving entrepreneurs outside of Silicon Valley the opportunity to compete for startup funding.
The Museum's well-known Revolutionaries speaker series is going on the road. Our first stop is at NPR's new corporate headquarters and digital news center in Washington, DC, and our first speaker is Steve Case.

Today Case wears many hats—including serving as Chairman and CEO of Revolution LLC, a Washington DC-based investment firm that he co-founded. He is also Chairman of UP Global and Chairman of The Case Foundation.

But Case made his mark in computer history as the co-founder of America Online, where he began his entrepreneurial career in 1985. AOL put much of America online and on the Internet in the 1990s, and its merger with Time Warner in 2000 was one of the epic moments in the dot-com boom. Some observers believe it represented the zenith of the early Internet's heyday before Wall Street and the economy reset the playing field in the early 2000s.

The sum of this work has made Case one of America's best-known and most accomplished entrepreneurs and philanthropists. He is, without question, a pioneer in making the online world part of everyday life.
Museum CEO John Hollar will lead an in-depth conversation with Steve about his early life in Hawaii, how his passion for starting companies and for supporting entrepreneurs developed, his roller-coaster ride at the top of AOL, his work in the public policy arena and his philanthropic endeavors. They will also discuss his "Rise of the Rest" campaign and tour, giving entrepreneurs outside of Silicon Valley the opportunity to compete for startup funding.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be recording tonight's program for broadcast on Thursday, November 6 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Sep 26, 2014 10:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Computer History Museum: Celebrating 35 Years
Join us as Museum co-founder Gordon Bell and Museum Chairman Len Shustek discuss with Museum President and CEO John Hollar the making of the leading museum devoted to the computing and its impact on society.
The Computer History Museum marks its 35th birthday on September 24th. Visitors from around the world see an impressive set of exhibits, but the history of the institution and its collection is almost as interesting as a visit to the Museum itself.

The Museum has come a long way from a coat closet in Massachusetts to the beautiful multi-building permanent facility that today houses engaging exhibits and the largest collection of computing artifacts in the world.

Join us as Museum co-founder Gordon Bell and Museum Chairman Len Shustek discuss with Museum President and CEO John Hollar the making of the leading museum devoted to the computing and its impact on society.

Aug 21, 2014 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
From Mainframe to Smartphone: What an Amazing Trip It's Been with Dr. Dileep Bhandarkar, Qualcomm
From Mainframe to Smartphone: What an Amazing Trip It's Been
Disruptive technologies have caused dramatic changes in computing technology for decades. This talk will show how a series of disruptions have set the course for a world that has evolved from the mainframe to the current smartphone revolution.
Disruptive technologies have caused dramatic changes in computing technology for decades, often in unacknowledged ways. In this talk, Dr. Dileep Bhandarkar will paint a picture that puts these changes into perspective, and which shows how this series of disruptions have set a course that has evolved from the mainframe to the current smartphone, mobile and cloud computing world.

Dr. Bhandarkar has been an architect in the areas of memory and processor design, workstation and server systems, and data center infrastructure while at TI, DEC, Intel, and Microsoft. His current work as VP of Technology at Qualcomm focuses on energy efficient designs for next generation computing platforms. Dileep holds 16 US patents, and has published more than 30 technical papers. He became an IEEE Fellow for his contributions and technical leadership in the design of complex and reduced instruction set architecture, and in computer system performance analysis.


Join us for this fascinating lecture by Dr. Bhandakar as he paints a picture that puts this technology evolution into perspective.

Bring a bag lunch and enjoy the discussion with Museum family and friends. Box lunches will be made available for purchase in the Museum café.

This program is being sponsored by Qualcomm, the Santa Clara Valley Section of the IEEE, and the Computer History Museum.
Aug 7, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Akamai's Co-Founder & CEO Tom Leighton in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Akamai's Tom Leighton in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Join John Hollar for an in-depth conversation with Akamai Co-Founder and CEO Tom Leighton about his distinguished career. We'll also get a peek under the hood at one of the world’s leading Internet infrastructure companies.
"Our customers are located in 192 different countries, and Akamai allows us to deliver a fast experience wherever they might be. Akami has been a very important partner for us to scale Airbnb."
- Nathan BlecharczykCTO and Co-Founder, Airbnb


Akamai's beginnings lie in a challenge posed by World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in early 1995. The father of the Web foresaw the congestion that is now very familiar to Internet users, and he challenged colleagues at MIT to invent a fundamentally new and better way to deliver Internet content.
MIT Professor of Applied Mathematics Tom Leighton, who had an office down the hall from Dr. Berners-Lee, was intrigued by the challenge. Dr. Leighton, a renowned expert on parallel algorithms and architecture, recognized that a solution to Web congestion could be found in applied mathematics and algorithms. He solicited the help of graduate student Danny Lewin, and several other top researchers, to tackle the problem.

The company launched commercial service in 1999 and announced that one of the world’s most trafficked Web properties, Yahoo!, was a charter customer. Now, its customers include the top 30 media and entertainment companies, the top 60 ecommerce companies, all branches of the U.S. military and all major sports leagues. Akamai delivers between 15 to 30% of all Web traffic, and delivers over 2 trillion daily Internet interactions. Its cloud platform contains 147,000 servers in 92 countries, within over 1,200 networks.

Join us as John Hollar navigates an in-depth conversation with Tom Leighton about his distinguished career, and get a peek under the hood at one of the world's leading Internet infrastructure companies.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be recording this program for broadcast on Wednesday, August 20 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Jul 24, 2014 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Intel Trinity: How Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Built the World’s Most Important Company
The Intel Trinity
In today’s world of Google, Facebook, and Twitter, the digital age has all but forgotten its beginnings and the man who created the device upon whom all of these empires rested, the scientist behind two of the greatest inventions of the last century. Once hailed as the “Mayor of Silicon Valley,” Robert Noyce and his colleagues, “the Traitorous Eight,” sparked the technological revolution that...
In today’s world of Google, Facebook, and Twitter, the digital age has all but forgotten its beginnings and the man who created the device upon which all of these empires rested, the scientist behind two of the greatest inventions of the last century. Once hailed as the “Mayor of Silicon Valley,” Robert Noyce and his colleagues, the "Traitorous Eight,” sparked the technological revolution that we are still reaping the rewards from today. Noyce would eventually go on to cofound Intel, one of the most valuable companies in the world. Now, in his comprehensive and entertaining new book, The Intel Trinity: How Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Built the World’s Most Important Company, well-connected and trusted technology writer Michael S. Malone brings to life the story behind the company that made possible the personal computer, the Internet, telecommunications and the personal electronics revolution.

On a warm September morning in 1957 seven key employees of Shockley Transistor of Mountain View, California decided to quit their jobs and strike out on their own, marking the beginning of what would become Silicon Valley. These men would go on to form Fairchild Semiconductor and revolutionize the way we work and live. Drawing on unprecedented access to the Intel archives and on interviews and oral histories from its earliest days through the present, Malone reveals how each member of the founding Intel trio brought different things at different times. Noyce was the charismatic leader and the most respected high-tech figure of his generation. Gordon Moore set the law that accelerated the pace of innovation—the biennial doubling of computer chip performance. Andy Grove was the greatest and most ferocious businessman of his generation. Together, these three achieved Intel’s historic success.

Bring a bag lunch and enjoy the discussion with CHM family and friends. Box lunches will be made available for purchase in the Museum café.

Kepler’s Books will be on-site selling copies of The Intel Trinity before and after the program.
Jul 9, 2014 6:00 PM Special Events
Fearless Genius Exhibit Opening Party
Invite Only Event
The Computer History Museum invites our special guests to the opening of Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985–2000. The evening will include food, wine, and great conversation. Please join us to celebrate the opening of the new exhibit.
The Computer History Museum invites our special guests to the opening of Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985–2000. The evening will include food, wine, and great conversation. Please join us to celebrate the opening of the new exhibit.

Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985–2000 features 50 photographs by renowned documentary photographer Doug Menuez. In his fifteen years of unprecedented behind-the scenes access to Apple, Kleiner Perkins, Adobe, and other iconic Silicon Valley organizations, Menuez captures a pivotal time in the Valley’s history as the computing industry began its transition from analog to digital.

This exhibit chronicles the rise of pioneering innovators like Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Charles Geschke, and John Warnock, while shining a spotlight on the often forgotten moments of the men and women who toiled to turn the digital dream into reality, often at great personal sacrifice and struggle.

This exhibit is made possible through the generosity of Micron Technology.

Photo©Doug Menuez/Contour by Getty Images/Stanford University Libraries
Jul 9, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Fearless Genius by Doug Menuez
Fearless Genius by Doug Menuez
Award-winning photographer Doug Menuez documented the leading innovators of California’s Silicon Valley during the digital revolution as they invented the technology that would change our world forever. Menuez's project, Fearless Genius, began in 1985 with Steve Jobs as Jobs was starting over after losing a boardroom battle and leaving Apple.
Award-winning photographer Doug Menuez documented the leading innovators of California’s Silicon Valley during the digital revolution as they invented the technology that would change our world forever. Menuez's project, Fearless Genius, began in 1985 with Steve Jobs as Jobs was starting over after losing a boardroom battle and leaving Apple.

In an extraordinary act of trust, Jobs allowed Menuez special access to photograph him as he built a new company, NeXT, and a powerful new supercomputer that Jobs hoped would transform education. Once Silicon Valley heard that Jobs had granted Menuez complete access, everyone did. He spent time photographing more than seventy other leading companies and innovators, including Intel’s Gordon Moore and Andy Grove, Adobe’s John Warnock, and Sun Microsystems’ Bill Joy. Menuez continued working through the Internet boom of the 1990s.

In this talk, Menuez will share eyewitness stories of the unknown sacrifice, insanely hard work, and relentless optimism of a secretive, brilliant tribe during those early and transformative days of the digital revolution. There are significant lessons from this era that are relevant and inspiring for today’s innovators as we attempt to catch the next big wave of transformational technology development.

This event will coincide with the launch of our new exhibit Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley 1985–2000 on display in the lobby from July 9 to September 7, 2014.

Bring a bag lunch and enjoy the discussion with Museum family and friends. Box lunches will be made available for purchase in the Museum café.
©Doug Menuez/Contour by Getty Images/Stanford University Libraries
Jun 11, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar in Conversation with The New York Times' John Markoff
DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar in Conversation with The New York Times' John Markoff
Tonight Dr. Arati Prabhakar will join John Markoff for a conversation about her remarkable career, the Agency's history and impact, initiatives, and new breakthrough technologies like self-destructible computer chips. We will also learn more about her vision for DARPA's future and ways to keep the engine of innovation running in the face of fiscal constraints and other threats.
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) was created by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1958, when the political and defense communities recognized the need for a high-level defense organization to formulate and execute R&D projects that would expand the frontiers of technology and science far beyond immediate military requirements.

DARPA is the Department of Defense's primary innovation engine with a remarkable track record of breakthroughs in its 56 years, from precision guidance and navigation, stealth, night vision, communications and networking. Much of its success is due to hiring remarkable program managers for a finite term, who create projects they decide can really change the world. DARPA makes pivotal early investments in these projects, building and leveraging broad technical communities to help create the capabilities.

Dr. Arati Prabhakar first joined DARPA in 1986 as one of those program managers. After several years in public service she headed to Silicon Valley working largely in the commercial sector, before returning to DARPA’s as its twentieth director. She is uniquely qualified for the role as she has spent her career investing in world-class engineers and scientists to create new technologies and businesses.

Tonight she will join John Markoff for a conversation about her remarkable career, the Agency’s history and impact, initiatives, and new breakthrough technologies like self-destructible computer chips. We’ll also learn more about her vision for DARPA’s future and ways to keep the engine of innovation running in the face of fiscal constraints and other threats.

Please join us.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site recording this program for broadcast Wednesday, July 30 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
May 31 - Jun 1, 2014 10:00 AM Special Events
Community Event
Mountain View Community Weekend at the Computer History Museum!
Featuring our new exhibit: Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles
The Computer History Museum invites Mountain View residents and their families and friends to be our special guests and enjoy a fun-filled day at the Museum.
The Computer History Museum invites Mountain View residents, and their families and friends to be our special guests and enjoy a fun-filled day at the Museum. You’ll see the Museum’s large-scale 25,000 sq. ft. state of the art exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing. Revolution celebrates the spectacular history of computing, from the mysterious ancient devices to technologies of the future. Journey through 19 galleries displaying over 1,000 unique artifacts; discover, in our multimedia displays, the backstories, development drama, and astonishing breakthroughs of the gadgets, gurus and companies you love, or love to hate!

Also, experience our new exhibit Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles which chronicles the decades-long challenge of bringing self-driving cars to the general public. In this timely new exhibit, visitors will learn about the history of autonomous vehicles, enjoy science fiction and popular culture dreams of the driverless family car, get up close with the Google self-driving car, and learn how this amazing technology works.

REVOLUTION, WHERE TO? and more:

  • Experience the Babbage Engine, the PDP-1 Restoration, and the IBM 1401 Demo Lab

  • Learn about the Computer History Museum’s acclaimed lecture series Revolutionaries

  • Shop to your (geeky) heart’s content with 15% off in our Museum store

  • Two-year CHM memberships for the price of one annual membership

  • Find plenty of free parking


If you live or work in Mountain View you will receive free admission for the weekend. Bring as many family and friends along as you'd like! Simply present your proof of residency, or your company badge at the check-in table.
May 9, 2014 10:00 AM Special Events
Member Only Event
Member Preview of New Exhibit: Where to? A History of Autonomous Vehicles
We invite you and a guest to an exclusive member reception and debut of the Computer History Museum's latest visitor experience, Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles on Friday, May 9 from 10 AM to 12 PM. The morning will include a light brunch, mingling and a viewing of the new exhibit before it opens to the public.
We invite you and a guest to an exclusive member reception and debut of the Computer History Museum's latest visitor experience, Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles on Friday, May 9 from 10 AM to 12 PM. The morning will include a light brunch, mingling and a viewing of the new exhibit before it opens to the public.

Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles will chronicle the decades-long challenge of bringing self-driving cars to the general public. Self-driving cars have remained perpetually “two decades away” since the 1930s, while over the past century, autonomous and semi-autonomous vehicles have conquered the air, sea, and roamed the edges of our solar system. In this timely new exhibit, visitors will learn about the history of autonomous vehicles, enjoy science fiction and popular culture dreams of the driverless family car, get up close with the Google self-driving car, and learn how this amazing technology works.

Join us, for this special member celebration.

May 8, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Creativity, Inc: Author Ed Catmull in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Creativity, Inc: Author Ed Catmull in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Ed Catmull, a Fellow of the Computer History Museum, joins John Hollar for a conversation about how to build a sustained creative culture, nurturing both the technical and artistic "poles of creativity."
"Many have attempted to formulate and categorize inspiration and creativity. What Ed Catmull shares instead is his astute experience that creativity isn’t strictly a well of ideas, but an alchemy of people. In Creativity, Inc. Ed reveals, with commonsense specificity and honesty, examples of how not to get in your own way and how to realize a creative coalescence of art, business, and innovation."
- George Lucas

As a young man, Ed Catmull had a dream: to be an animator and an artist. When he learned that he lacked the natural talent for hand-drawn animation, he turned to his other passion: physics, and then computing. That pivot eventually drove a desire within Catmull to make the first computer-animated movie. He nurtured that dream as a Ph.D student at the University of Utah, where many computer graphics pioneers got their start. He eventually forged a partnership with George Lucas—an alliance that led, indirectly, to his founding Pixar Annimation Studios with Steve Jobs and John Lasseter in 1986. Nine years later, Pixar released Toy Story, the first feature-length film created entirely on computers. It changed animation forever.

Pixar has gone on, as of early 2014, to win 27 Academy Awards® for animated filmmaking. When The Walt Disney Company bought Pixar in 2006 for $7.4 billion, Catmull became the President and CEO of the combined Walt Disney Animation Studios. Thus, through his chosen route of physics, mathematics and computing, Ed Catmull realized his dream to be a Disney animator.

The environment that Catmull and his colleagues built at Pixar, and continue within Disney, is based on philosophies that honor the creative process, strike a delicate balance between artistic storytelling and skilled engineering, and defy convention. In his new book, Creativity, Inc., Catmull reveals some of the secrets of Pixar's success and describes his own approach to inspiring excellence in a very large organization over the long term.

Ed Catmull, a Fellow of the Computer History Museum, joins John Hollar for a conversation about how to build a sustained creative culture, nurturing both the technical and artistic "poles of creativity."

Please join us for what is certain to be an inspiring evening with a true revolutionary.

We are pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping this program for broadcast on Thursday, May 22 at 8pm, and that Kepler’s Books will be on-site selling copies of Creativity, Inc. before and after tonight’s program.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Apr 10, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Game Changers: Sony Computer Entertainment's Shuhei Yoshida in Conversation with Mark Cerny
Game Changers: Sony Computer Entertainment's Shuhei Yoshida in Conversation with Mark Cerny
Shuhei Yoshida is President of Worldwide Studios at Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. (SCE). He has been with SCE since its inception and has been an integral part of the development of the PlayStation® family. Yoshida has overseen several successful product launches and was responsible for creating SCE's internal product development team. He was an executive producer for Gran Turismo™, and produced ICO, Ape Escape™, and The Legend of Dragoon®, among other popular titles.
Shuhei Yoshida is President of Worldwide Studios at Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. (SCE). He has been with SCE since its inception and has been an integral part of the development of the PlayStation® family. Yoshida has overseen several successful product launches and was responsible for creating SCE's internal product development team. He was an executive producer for Gran Turismo™, and produced ICO, Ape Escape™, and The Legend of Dragoon®, among other popular titles.

In March 2000, Yoshida moved to the US to oversee product development at Sony Computer Entertainment America (SCEA). In May 2008, Yoshida was appointed President of Worldwide Studios and is responsible for all first-party game software development activities for PlayStation® platforms, including 14 studios across the US, Europe, and Japan. To open the week of the much anticipated PlayStation®4 (PS4™) launch, SCEA released an official unboxing video of a PS4™ starring Yoshida. Throughout the video you only see a dark figure with coffee-brown colored leather gloves unwrap the contents of the box. At the very end of the video, Yoshida appears telling the audience, "Greatness Awaits."

Mark Cerny, a true veteran of the video game industry for over 30 years, has worked as a game designer, programmer, and producer of arcade and console games in both the US and Japan. In 2008, with Yoshida's advice, SCE asked Cerny to lead the design of the next generation console, the top selling PS4™. Yoshida's instinct paid off. PS4™ delivered the best launch ever in PlayStation® history, selling over 4.2 million worldwide as of December 28, 2013.

We’re pleased to welcome Mark Cerny back to our stage, this time in the moderator’s seat. As a result of their decades-long partnership and experience in the gaming industry, this is sure to be a compelling, in-depth conversation about Yoshida's early life and career path to SCE, their work together, the evolution of gaming software and hardware, and the state of the industry. Please join us.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be taping this program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Mar 27, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
The Art & Technology of Cirque du Soleil
The Art & Technology of Cirque du Soleil
From its beginnings 30 years ago as a group of 20 street performers, Cirque du Soleil is now a major Quebec-based organization providing high-quality artistic entertainment. The company has 5,000 employees, including more than 1,300 artists from more than 50 countries. It has brought wonder and delight to more than 100 million spectators in more than 300 cities in more than 40 countries on 6 continents.
From its beginnings 30 years ago as a group of 20 street performers, Cirque du Soleil is now a major Quebec-based organization providing high-quality artistic entertainment. The company has 5,000 employees, including more than 1,300 artists from more than 50 countries. It has brought wonder and delight to more than 100 million spectators in more than 300 cities in more than 40 countries on 6 continents.

Tonight our moderator, Will Travis, President of Sid Lee USA, will give the audience a glimpse into the technical “magic” driving their imaginative and daring programs. He’ll be joined by Cirque’s Director of Creation, Welby Altidor, and its Technical Director, Matthew Whelan.

They will also walk us through a case study to better illustrate their process—Michael Jackson ONE, a heartfelt tribute to the work, innovative spirit, and legacy of Michael Jackson in performance at Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. Technical elements of the show include a GPS tracking system equipped with sensors, 5,412 seat speakers, 26 projectors and 11 TV monitors, and a 40-ft-wide, 30-ft-high LED wall made up of 8 separate columns.

Cirque du Soleil’s mission is to invoke the imagination, provoke the senses, and evoke the emotions of people around the world. This is a rare look inside an imaginative organization that successfully blends daring artistry with cutting-edge technology.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be onsite taping the evening’s program for broadcast on Saturday, April 26 at 2pm.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Mar 12, 2014 2:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries:
Technion's President Peretz Lavie in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology was founded in 1912 in Haifa and is the oldest university in Israel and the Middle East. The university offers degrees in science and engineering, as well as related fields such as architecture, medicine, industrial management, and education.
This event highlights the Museum's ongoing commitment to showcasing computing history from around the world.

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology was founded in 1912 in Haifa and is the oldest university in Israel and the Middle East. The university offers degrees in science and engineering, as well as related fields such as architecture, medicine, industrial management, and education.

Israel is known as the "startup nation" and much of that drive and brainpower comes from the Technion, located in the northern city of Haifa. The fusion of academics and industry there has created a unique entrepreneurial fusion, much as it has here in Silicon Valley.

John Hollar will moderate a conversation with Professor Peretz Lavie, the Technion's 16th president. Along with Israel's penchant for innovation and entrepreneurship, they'll talk about the Technion's storied history, as well as Lavie's background and path to its presidency. Looking ahead, they'll discuss the Technion Cornell Innovation Institute, which will be located on Roosevelt Island in New York City.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Please note the special timing of this program –3PM– to accommodate the Professor’s travel schedule.
Mar 4, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries:
MLB Advanced Media's Robert A. Bowman in Conversation with Museum President & CEO John Hollar
Bob Bowman serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer of MLB Advanced Media, a position he has held since 2000.

Following Baseball Commissioner Allan H. (Bud) Selig’s recommendation in January 2000, professional baseball owners voted to centralize their collective internet and interactive media operations under one roof by building a technology company – MLBAM. Over its first 13 years guided by Bowman and his team, MLBAM’s developmental evolution and work in the interactive space has not only made it a model for building a successful and sustainable 21st Century digital media operation, but ultimately may define it as one of the great American business success stories.
"Major League Baseball Advanced Media – BAM, for short – is as technologically sophisticated as any company, anywhere."
– Fast Company

Bob Bowman serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer of MLB Advanced Media, a position he has held since 2000.

Following Baseball Commissioner Allan H. (Bud) Selig’s recommendation in January 2000, professional baseball owners voted to centralize their collective internet and interactive media operations under one roof by building a technology company – MLBAM. Over its first 13 years guided by Bowman and his team, MLBAM’s developmental evolution and work in the interactive space has not only made it a model for building a successful and sustainable 21st Century digital media operation, but ultimately may define it as one of the great American business success stories.

MLBAM, the largest New York born-and-bred technology company, has a proprietary multimedia ecosystem that is a one-of-a-kind graft of internet infrastructure and traditional television broadcasting. It is designed, built and managed internally for the acquisition, production and delivery of live and on-demand HD sports and non-sports content to millions of users. MLBAM supports dozens of partners for encoding and streaming more than 20,000 live events annually.

MLBAM: A Box Score

  • 8th Most Valuable Privately Owned Tech Company in the World (Business Insider)

  • 9th Most Valuable Global Sports Brand (Forbes)

  • 13 million visits to MLB.com per day during baseball season

  • 10th highest-grossing iOS app ever (MLB.com At Bat)

  • 10 million downloads of MLB.com At Bat in 2013 (+49% YOY)

  • 1.5 petabytes of live and on-demand baseball video content generated by MLBAM each season



Museum President & CEO John Hollar will conduct a play-by-play interview with Bowman about the path that led to MLBAM, and how with great leadership and deft political skills he was able to turn a fledgling startup into a multimedia powerhouse. Bowman’s vision for MLBAM always put technology at the forefront of the organization, and that vision and entrepreneurial spirit has made the baseball fan user experience second to none. It also means that the company is highly successful and constantly innovating and pushing technological limits. Join us for a riveting conversation with a revolutionary at the intersection of sports, business and technology.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be onsite taping the evening’s program for broadcast Thursday, April 3 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed speaker series, Revolutionaries. It features renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Mar 3, 2014 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries:
The New Digital Age: Authors Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen in Conversation with Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg
In an unparalleled collaboration, two leading global thinkers in technology and foreign affairs give us their widely anticipated, transformational vision of the future: a world where everyone is connected — a world full of challenges and benefits that are ours to meet and harness.
“At last, a brilliant guide book for the next century—what the future holds for entrepreneurs, revolutionaries, politicians, and ordinary citizens alike. Schmidt and Cohen offer a dazzling glimpse into how the new digital revolution is changing our lives. This book is the most insightful exploration of our future world I’ve ever read, and once I started reading I was simply unable to put it down.”

-Sir Richard Branson, founder and chairman, Virgin Group

In an unparalleled collaboration, two leading global thinkers in technology and foreign affairs give us their widely anticipated, transformational vision of the future: a world where everyone is connected — a world full of challenges and benefits that are ours to meet and harness.

Schmidt and Cohen traveled to more than 35 countries, including some of the world’s most volatile and repressive societies, where they met with political leaders, entrepreneurs, and activists to learn firsthand about the challenges they face. They tackle some of the most interesting questions about our future: how will technology change privacy and security, war and intervention, diplomacy, revolution and terrorism? How will technology improve our lives? What new disruptions can we expect?

Eric Schmidt is one of Silicon Valley’s great leaders, having taken Google from a small startup to one of the world’s most influential companies. Jared Cohen is the director of Google Ideas and a former adviser to Secretaries of State Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Clinton.

The New Digital Age's release in paperback – with a new afterward -- provided the spark for this program. We’re very pleased to host the authors and to welcome Sheryl Sandberg back to our stage, this time as moderator. Please join us for a thoughtful and provocative conversation about the promise and perils of the digital revolution, with these outstanding speakers.

We are very pleased that CSPAN Book TV will be taping this event for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Feb 20, 2014 6:00 PM Special Events
NextGen Advisory Board Presents
Ninja Innovation and Startup Culture
Fresh from his command performance at CES 2014, Consumer Electronics Association President and CEO Gary Shapiro joins moderator and tech evangelist Robert Scoble in a wide-ranging conversation about Gary’s New York Times bestseller, Ninja Innovation: The Ten Killer Strategies of the World's Most Successful Businesses.

Ninja Innovator [ˈninjə ˈinəˌvātər] noun
Leaders who exhibit the traits of ancient Japanese warriors: they are disciplined, determined and passionate, and willing...
Fresh from his command performance at CES 2014, Consumer Electronics Association President and CEO Gary Shapiro joins moderator and tech evangelist Robert Scoble in a wide-ranging conversation about Gary’s New York Times bestseller, Ninja Innovation: The Ten Killer Strategies of the World's Most Successful Businesses.

Ninja Innovator [ˈninjə ˈinəˌvātər] noun
Leaders who exhibit the traits of ancient Japanese warriors: they are disciplined, determined and passionate, and willing to take risks in order to succeed. Above all, modern Ninja Innovators understand that in today’s technology world, a successful startup must innovate or die!

In three decades leading the Consumer Electronics Association, Gary and his team have built CES into the must-see technology event of the year each January. In the meantime, he has learned important lessons about “ninja innovation”—disruption, determination, discipline and passion. In his book, he distills many of these lessons into important principles that work in any business setting. Many of those principles were on display this year when CES again featured startups and entrepreneurs at their "Eureka Park Tech Zone" -- now in its third year and growing exponentially.

In the latest in our “Future History Makers series,” Gary will share his knowledge and describe key emerging trends that are helping direct startup “ninja innovation” in this competitive landscape.

Come discover how you can find and develop your inner ninja!
Feb 18, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Cisco's Padmasree Warrior in Conversation with NPR's Laura Sydell
Padmasree Warrior is a true revolutionary. As a young woman she came to the U.S. to pursue her masters degree in chemical engineering at Cornell University with $100 in her pocket and a one-way plane ticket. Just over twenty years later, she’s one of Forbes “100 Most Powerful Women,” and Cisco CEO John Chambers says she’s among those at the top of the list to succeed him.
Padmasree Warrior is a true revolutionary. As a young woman she came to the U.S. to pursue her masters degree in chemical engineering at Cornell University with $100 in her pocket and a one-way plane ticket. Just over twenty years later, she’s one of Forbes “100 Most Powerful Women,” and Cisco CEO John Chambers says she’s among those at the top of the list to succeed him.

As Cisco’s Chief Technology & Strategy Officer, Padmasree Warrior is charged with aligning technology development and corporate strategy to enable Cisco to anticipate, shape, and lead major market transitions. She helps direct technology and operational innovation across the company and oversees strategic partnerships, mergers and acquisitions, the integration of new business models, the incubation of new technologies, and the cultivation of world-class technical talent.

In her previous role, Warrior served as Chief Technology Officer (CTO) and also co-led Cisco's worldwide engineering organization. As Senior Vice President, Engineering, she was responsible for core switching, collaboration, cloud computing and data center/virtualization, security, and architectures for business transformation.

Tonight NPR Correspondent Laura Sydell will moderate a wide-ranging conversation with a real revolutionary, Padmasree Warrior. Please join us.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be onsite taping this program for broadcast on Wednesday, March 5 at 8pm.
Feb 13, 2014 3:00 PM Special Events
How Do We Continue to Power Modern Civilization Without Destroying It? A Film Screening of Pandora's Promise
From time to time, the Computer History Musuem joins with partners from around the country to bring programming of special interest to our broad audiences. We are pleased to invite you to just such a program: a screening of Pandora’s Promise, an award-winning documentary by Academy Award® nominee Robert Stone. The film is presented in partnership with GW & Wade, LLC.

Please note that you’re also...
From time to time, the Computer History Musuem joins with partners from around the country to bring programming of special interest to our broad audiences. We are pleased to invite you to just such a program: a screening of Pandora’s Promise, an award-winning documentary by Academy Award® nominee Robert Stone. The film is presented in partnership with GW & Wade, LLC.

Please note that you’re also invited to the special post-screening conversation with Robert Stone, Michael Shellenberger, and Nobel Laureate Burton Richter, moderated by Museum advisory board member Ray Rothrock.

Names for the evening screening and reception wait list are being accepted.

The matinee showing has available tickets, please register at the link provided below.

If you have any questions regarding this event please contact our partner for this event Gene Sinclair at (650) 618-6323 or gsinclair@gwwade.com.
Feb 6, 2014 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Regis McKenna in Conversation with John Markoff
Regis McKenna founded his own high tech marketing firm, Regis McKenna, Inc., in Silicon Valley in 1970 after working in the marketing departments of two early semiconductor pioneering companies. Over the past 30 years, his firm evolved from one focused on high tech start ups to a broad based marketing strategy firm servicing international clients in many different industries and countries. McKenna retired from consulting in 2000 and is concentrating his efforts on high tech entrepreneurial seed-ventures.
Regis McKenna founded his own high tech marketing firm, Regis McKenna, Inc., in Silicon Valley in 1970 after working in the marketing departments of two early semiconductor pioneering companies. Over the past 30 years, his firm evolved from one focused on high tech start ups to a broad based marketing strategy firm servicing international clients in many different industries and countries. McKenna retired from consulting in 2000 and is concentrating his efforts on high tech entrepreneurial seed-ventures.

McKenna and his firm worked with a number of entrepreneurial start-ups during their formation years including: America Online, Apple, Compaq, Electronic Arts, Genentech, Intel, Linear Technology, Lotus, Microsoft, National Semiconductor, Silicon Graphics, 3COM, and many others. McKenna helped launch some of the most important technological innovations of the last thirty years including the first microprocessor (Intel Corporation), the first personal computer (Apple Computer), the first recombinant DNA genetically engineered product (Genentech, Inc.), and the first retail computer store (The Byte Shop). In the last decade, McKenna consulted on strategic marketing and business issues to industrial, consumer, transportation, healthcare, and financial firms in the United States, Japan, and Europe. McKenna continues to be involved in high tech start-up companies through his venture activities.

McKenna is included in the San Jose Mercury News' Millennium 100 as one of the 100 people who made Silicon Valley what it is today. McKenna has written and lectured extensively on the social and market effects of technological change advancing innovations in marketing theories and practices.

Our moderator is John Markoff of The New York Times, who will guide us through a fascinating conversation with a marketing mastermind.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Jan 9, 2014 12:00 PM Speaker Series
Computer History Museum and Commonwealth Club of SF Present
Telecommunications Policy: Remarks by new FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler
Tom Wheeler, the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission under President Obama, will appear for the first time in Silicon Valley to deliver remarks on his vision for national telecommunications policy. Wheeler became the 31st Chairman of the FCC on November 4.

For more than three decades, Chairman Wheeler has been involved with new telecommunications networks and services, experiencing the revolution...
Tom Wheeler, the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission under President Obama, will appear for the first time in Silicon Valley to deliver remarks on his vision for national telecommunications policy. Wheeler became the 31st Chairman of the FCC on November 4.

For more than three decades, Chairman Wheeler has been involved with new telecommunications networks and services, experiencing the revolution in telecommunications as a policy expert, an advocate, and a businessman. The FCC’s approach to regulation, technology innovation and market growth is of critical importance to Silicon Valley and the nation, and this will be the first opportunity for West Coast audiences to hear from Chairman Wheeler personally since his confirmation.

Following Chairman Wheeler's remarks he will sit for a Q&A session with Museum President & CEO, John Hollar.

If you are with the media and wish to attend this event, please contact Carina Sweet, csweet@computerhistory.org.

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2013 Events

Dec 14, 2013 10:00 AM Education Event
Education Event
The Hour of Code!
Code for an Hour!
This year, on December 14, we will participate in The Hour of Code, a national campaign sponsored by code.org, which will introduce the creativity, excitement, and fun of computer programming for everyone. From 10am to 4pm, visitors will be able to try their hand at a variety of self-guided tutorials that can be done on any device by anybody, from students to seniors. No experience necessary!
Today, history is being made by technologies that are transforming the way we work, live, learn, and play. We use these every day, but very few of us know how to write the programs that make them work.

On December 14, the Museum will participate in The Hour of Code, a worldwide campaign sponsored by code.org, to introduce the creativity, excitement, and fun of computer programming to everyone. From 10am to 4pm, visitors can try their hand at self-guided tutorials that can be done on any device by anybody, from students to seniors. No experience necessary! Bring your own tablet or mobile device or use one of our laptops. We’ll have everything you need to learn the basics of computer programming … in just an hour!

About The Hour of Code:
The Hour of Code is part of Computer Science Education week (December 9-15), developed by code.org to celebrate the birthday of Grace Murray Hopper. Hopper was one of the first women engineers, a developer of the COBOL programming language, and a 1987 Fellow of the Museum. Learn more about her at computerhistory.org/fellowawards/hall/bios/Grace,Hopper/. Code.org is a non-profit dedicated to expanding computer science education, especially for women and underrepresented students of color.

For more information visit code.org
Dec 11, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
OSTP's Director John P. Holdren with John Markoff of The New York Times
OSTP's Director John P. Holdren with John Markoff of The New York Times
This event is part of the Museum's Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
"Whether it’s improving our health or harnessing clean energy, protecting our security or succeeding in the global economy, our future depends on reaffirming America’s role as the world’s engine of scientific discovery and technological innovation."
-President Barack Obama

Dr. John P. Holdren is Assistant to the President for Science and Technology, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), and Co-Chair of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST).

Congress established the Office of Science and Technology Policy in 1976 with a broad mandate to advise the President and others within the Executive Office of the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The 1976 Act also authorizes OSTP to lead interagency efforts to develop and implement sound science and technology policies and budgets, and to work with the private sector, state and local governments, the science and higher education communities, and other nations toward this end.

We are very pleased to welcome Dr. Holdren and our moderator, John Markoff, the Pulitzer prize winning senior writer of The New York Times science section. Tonight we will learn more about the Director and his mandate, as well as many of the initiatives the OSTP has put in place.

Please join us.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping tonight's program and will broadcast it Wednesday, January 8 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum's Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Dec 9, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Technology Legend: Honoring Douglas Engelbart
Honoring Douglas Engelbart
Join us for an evening of celebrating his achievements, and of challenging some of today’s pivotal leaders to think about how his unfinished revolution may be useful going forward.
As a young Doug Engelbart could only imagine sixty years ago, much of the world’s population does the bulk of its reading, writing, and research tasks online. We sit at interactive screens, just as he foresaw, and click on the hypertext links he developed, with the mouse he invented. We chat and send emails, as his Augmentation Research Center staff did in the 1960s. We meet in videoconferences, the technology they showed the world at a famous 1968 public demo. We do all of this over computer networks including the Internet, both partly developed within his laboratory at SRI.

But when it comes to the kind of knowledge navigation and collaboration tools that were the heart of Engelbart’s oNLine System (NLS), we’ve climbed only the first rung of the ladder. And when it comes to the ambitious goal that drove him to build all his technology – to augment human intelligence so that we might better address the world’s big problems – we’ve barely even stepped off the ground. What can we learn today from this great inventor, whose idea of iterative “bootstrapping” anticipated the promises of the Singularity but with a human face – no machine intelligence required?

Join us for an evening of celebrating his achievements, and of challenging some of today’s pivotal leaders to think about how his unfinished revolution may be useful going forward. December 9 will be the 45th Anniversary of the “Mother of All Demos.”Douglas Engelbart died on July 2 this year. Some of the main records of his laboratory at SRI are in the Museum’s collection, and form a crucial part of the CHM Internet History Program. The Douglas Engelbart Memorial Fund helps support preservation and access for these materials.
Dec 7, 2013 10:00 AM Special Events
Members Only Event
Member Appreciation Day
As a special thank you to our loyal members, the Computer History Museum is hosting its Annual Member Day celebration! Friends unite for a one-stop shopping experience in our Museum Store, and what better timing than right before the holidays. Find favorite gadgets, hundreds of books, geeky apparel, unique jewelry, games and receive 25% off everything. The day will also include...

--Unlimited guests! Members can...
As a special thank you to our loyal members, the Computer History Museum is hosting its Annual Member Day celebration! Friends unite for a one-stop shopping experience in our Museum Store, and what better timing than right before the holidays. Find favorite gadgets, hundreds of books, geeky apparel, unique jewelry, games and receive 25% off everything. The day will also include...

--Unlimited guests! Members can bring in any number of guests and they too will receive free admission to the Museum.
--Member and guests enjoy some holiday goodies. 10 am to 11:30 am.
--Holiday Sing-a-long with the PDP-1. Enjoy a chance to sing holiday favorites with other Museum enthusiasts while accompanied by DEC’s PDP-1 computer.

If you are unable to join us on Saturday, December 7 you may preview and select items in our Museum Store 3 days prior to the event. We will hold your items with your credit card number, and will ring up the purchase on Saturday, December 7. You can pick up your purchase during our regular store hours beginning Sunday, December 8 – Saturday, December 14. Questions? Email the Museum Store Manager, Sandra Shu-Lee, or call her at (650) 810-1031.

If you have any questions about the Member Appreciation Day please email membership@computerhistory.org.


We look forward to seeing you!
Nov 20, 2013 10:00 AM Special Events
Members Only Event
IBM 1401 Demo Lab: Member Preview
Please join us for a special celebration of the Computer History Museum’s latest visitor experience: IBM 1401 Demo Lab. This invitation is for Museum members and their guests to join us on Wednesday, November 20, for a reception and private demonstration as we open the IBM 1401 Demo Lab.

The IBM 1401 Demo Lab represents a new era in the Museum’s continued growth. Through generous...
Please join us for a special celebration of the Computer History Museum’s latest visitor experience: IBM 1401 Demo Lab. This invitation is for Museum members and their guests to join us on Wednesday, November 20, for a reception and private demonstration as we open the IBM 1401 Demo Lab.

The IBM 1401 Demo Lab represents a new era in the Museum’s continued growth. Through generous contributions from Museum members, trustees, volunteers, private donors and IBM, we have expanded the former 1401 restoration area into a full-on Lab that will now be fully exhibited to the public for the first time. The Lab houses two restored IBM 1401 mainframe systems that have only been available for private access until now.

We hope you’ll join us —to meet the restoration teams, see the new space and celebrate a special era in computer history.

The 1401 Demo Lab will be open to the public starting November 20th. Public demonstrations will be held Wednesday at 3pm.
Nov 18, 2013 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Smithsonian's History of America in 101 Objects: Author Richard Kurin in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
The Smithsonian's History of America in 101 Objects: Author Richard Kurin in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Please join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates a conversation with Dr. Kurin about the genesis of the book and the journey he took in pulling it together, and the surprises he encountered along the way.
The Smithsonian Institution is America's largest, most important, and most beloved repository for the objects that define our common heritage. Now Under Secretary for Art, History, and Culture Richard Kurin, aided by a team of top Smithsonian curators and scholars, has assembled a literary exhibition of 101 objects from across the Smithsonian's museums that together offer a marvelous new perspective on the history of the United States.

Ranging from the earliest years of the pre-Columbian continent to the Digital Age, and from the American Revolution to Vietnam, each entry pairs the fascinating history surrounding each object with the story of its creation or discovery and the place it has come to occupy in our national memory. Kurin sheds remarkable new light on objects we think we know well, from Lincoln's hat to Dorothy's ruby slippers and Julia Child's kitchen, including the often astonishing tales of how each made its way into the collections of the Smithsonian. Other objects will be eye-opening new discoveries for many, but no less evocative of the most poignant and important moments of the American experience. Some objects, such as Harriet Tubman's hymnal, Sitting Bull's ledger, Cesar Chavez's union jacket, and the Enola Gay bomber, tell difficult stories from the nation's history, and inspire controversies when exhibited at the Smithsonian. Others, from George Washington's sword to the space shuttle Discovery, celebrate the richness and vitality of the American spirit. In Kurin's hands, each object comes to vivid life, providing a tactile connection to American history.

Please join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates a conversation with Dr. Kurin about this remarkable book.

We are very pleased that Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of Dr. Kurin's book before and after the program.
Oct 27, 2013 2:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
A Special Screening of 10x10's Girl Rising: Educate Girls, Change the World
The Computer History Museum is proud to host this special screening of Girl Rising. Intel Corporation is the film’s Strategic Action Partner, and Intel’s Vice President and CMO, Deborah Conrad, will introduce the film. Following the screening, Museum CEO John Hollar will have a conversation about making the film with its Senior Producer and Creative Director, Martha Adams.
"This film gives visual corroboration to knowledge we already have: Educating women and girls has the most optimistic, positive effects on families, communities, and economies worldwide. If to see it is to know it, this film delivers hope; reasonable, measurable, tangible hope that the world can be healed and helped to a better future!"
- Meryl Streep

One Girl with Courage is a Revolution. Girl Rising, a groundbreaking film directed by Academy Award nominee Richard Robbins, tells the stories of 9 extraordinary girls from 9 countries, written by 9 celebrated writers and narrated by 9 renowned actresses. Girl Rising showcases the strength of the human spirit and the power of education to change the world.

The Computer History Museum is proud to host this special screening of Girl Rising. Intel Corporation is the film’s Strategic Action Partner, and Intel’s Vice President and CMO, Deborah Conrad, will introduce the film. Following the screening, Museum CEO John Hollar will have a conversation about making the film with its Senior Producer and Creative Director, Martha Adams.

Please join us, and prepare to be inspired! Note that this film is rated PG-13 – Parents Strongly Cautioned. Some Material May Be Inappropriate for Children Under 13. Thematic material
Oct 25, 2013 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Deus Ex Machina
IBM Fellow Grady Booch on Computing: The Human Experience
This presentation is the next in our series for Computing: The Human Experience. No matter your individual position on the matter, it is a reality that faith is a powerful element of the human experience, and so it comes as no surprise that computing intersects with the story of belief in many profound ways. In this lecture, we will examine several of these stories, leading to an understanding in how different faith traditions have reacted to and in some ways contributed to the advance of computing. From Pope Benedict’s blessing via Twitter to the growth of the Digital Sabbath movement, from the technology-driven exegesis of the Dead Sea Scrolls to the rise of the virtual church, computing has impacted the ways we believe and the means by which some make their faith manifest.
I have made things clear to some extent by the origin of numbers from 0 and 1, which I have observed is the most beautiful symbol of the continuous creation of things from nothing and of their dependence on God.
- Gottfried Leibniz

In the days in which mainframes ruled the earth, there walked among us a programming priesthood. Just like the monks of old who would studiously labor over the production of their elegant manuscripts, programmers would do likewise. Each character, each line was important and so required their utmost concentration and the perfection of form. Their work completed, they would cautiously carry their precious cards to the sacred place of computation and hand their offerings to intermediaries locked away in their cold, sterile rooms. The members of this programming priesthood would in turn submit those gifts to their waiting machines, all hoping that they had carried out their rituals just right. If the machines were indeed well pleased, they would signal their reply with precise although not necessarily useful answers; if displeased, they would offer curious divinations, requiring hours of study to decipher before the ritual could begin again.

The coming of the minicomputer and then the personal computer brought an abrupt end to this curious period of computing, in a fashion not unlike Martin Luther’s subversive declarations that similarly broke the stranglehold of the church in the Middle Ages. And therein lies a story: does technology liberate the individual or does it make us a servant to the machines we ourselves create? Does computing contribute to our spiritual well-being or does it disrupt it by encouraging an interrupt-driven life that is filled with the noise of digital ephemera?

This presentation is the next in our series for Computing: The Human Experience. No matter your individual position on the matter, it is a reality that faith is a powerful element of the human experience, and so it comes as no surprise that computing intersects with the story of belief in many profound ways. In this lecture, we will examine several of these stories, leading to an understanding in how different faith traditions have reacted to and in some ways contributed to the advance of computing. From Pope Benedict’s blessing via Twitter to the growth of the Digital Sabbath movement, from the technology-driven exegesis of the Dead Sea Scrolls to the rise of the virtual church, computing has impacted the ways we believe and the means by which some make their faith manifest.

Belief systems came into being in part as a means of explaining the unexplainable, but along the way gave rise to important traditions that contributed to the advance of humanity in a number of unexpected ways. Yet, computing has been important tool in pushing back the edges of what we know we do not know, and so just as it has been with all technology, it is both a threat as well as an aid to faith. There’s even more: at the confluence of computing and physics, there are some who have proposed a very different kind of creation story for a fully digital universe, and so we are led to ask if there is even a deeper spiritual mystery that awaits us.
Oct 23, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Game Changers: Trip Hawkins with the New York Times' John Markoff
Game Changers: Trip Hawkins with the New York Times' John Markoff
This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Trip Hawkins is a Game Changer and a Revolutionary, who considered interactive games to be a new art form and their creators, artists. He founded Electronic Arts, 3DO and Digital Chocolate. He is also a Hall of Fame game industry and digital media consultant.

We are extremely pleased to welcome this gaming industry pioneer to our stage for a conversation with the New York Times’ John Markoff. They’ll talk about everything from his early days at Apple working for Steve Jobs, to founding Electronic Arts thirty years ago to 3DO and Digital Chocolate. He’s also on the board of Extreme Reality, a 3D gesturing company. What are his thoughts about how the gaming industry has evolved, the state of gaming today and how 3D technologies may change the ways we interact with devices. Please join us.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping this event for broadcast Wednesday, October 30 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Oct 8, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
An Evening with Intel's Justin Rattner
An Evening with Intel's Justin Rattner
This event is part of the Computer History Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Justin Rattner is an Intel Senior Fellow. He was Intel's Chief Technology Officer (CTO) and director of Intel Labs from 2006-2013 where he directed Intel's global research efforts in processors, programming, systems, security, communications and, most recently, user experience and interaction. As part of Intel Labs, Rattner was also responsible for funding academic research worldwide through its Science and Technology Centers, international research institutes, and individual faculty awards. Rattner joined Intel in 1973. He was named its first Principal Engineer in 1979 and its fourth Intel Fellow in 1988.

This is another event in a series designed to give our audiences unique insight into the remarkable work being done in our research labs around the world – a celebration of innovation. We hope you’ll join us for another compelling conversation about innovation in our research labs, moderated by Museum CEO John Hollar.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping tonight's event for broadcast on Wednesday, November 20 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Computer History Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Aug 27, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
America's Cup Comes to San Francisco: Technology Under Sail
America's Cup Comes to San Francisco: Technology Under Sail
This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
This is the 2013 "Summer of Racing" with some of the most sophisticated technology ever deployed in both America’s Cup racing and for the televised coverage of the race itself. The Museum is excited to host this special panel just before the America’s Cup finals in September. Our guests include Tom Ehman, Vice Commodore of the Golden Gate Yacht Club and Executive Director, America’s Cup Properties, Jimmy Spithill, Helmsman and Skipper of Oracle Team USA Racing, and the man behind the technology driving the race, Stan Honey, Director of Technology, America's Cup Event Authority.

We will learn about the challenges inherent in televising sailing and how those challenges were overcome with Stan Honey and his "A-Team." Honey, who invented the virtual first-down line for the NFL and strike-zone tracking for MLB (winning Emmys for both), will talk about the augmented reality system he is created for sailing, LiveLine, which helps distinguish who is in the lead, between-boat distances and other data to help viewers more easily follow the competition.

We will learn more about the technology deployed in the command center, the boats and on board the helicopters following the boats. Ehman and Spithill are both America's Cup veterans and will bring their own unique perspectives to the conversation.

John Hollar is our intrepid moderator and up for the challenge of navigating an exciting and educational conversation with some world-class sailors. We are certain that after attending you will be energized about watching the America's Cup finals – either in person or on television!

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping this event for broadcast Thursday, August 29 at 8pm.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Aug 8, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
An Evening with Qualcomm's Dr. Paul E. Jacobs
An Evening with Qualcomm's Dr. Paul E. Jacobs
This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Dr. Paul E. Jacobs is chairman of Qualcomm’s board of directors and the Company’s chief executive officer. A leader in the field of mobile communications for over two decades and a key architect of Qualcomm’s strategic vision, Dr. Jacobs is responsible for leadership and oversight of all the Company’s initiatives and operations.

He’ll join the Museum’s CEO John Hollar for a wide-ranging conversation about his beginnings, his path to Qualcomm and his vision for the company and for wireless. Additionally they’ll discuss Jacobs’ dedication to influencing U.S. broadband public policy, as well as his service to the World Economic Forum and the UN’s Broadband Commission for Digital Development.

Please join us for a thought-provoking conversation.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on-site taping this event for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Jul 16, 2013 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Totalisator - An Algorithm that Led to an Industry
Before the advent of computers, special-purpose hardware was used to solve computational problems. For the pari-mutuel system of gambling the main problem was keeping accurate totals of the bets placed on each horse in a race, and the grand total of all bets, in the frenzied half hour before the race, when, at the larger racecourses, tens of thousands of bets would be placed...
Before the advent of computers, special-purpose hardware was used to solve computational problems. For the pari-mutuel system of gambling the main problem was keeping accurate totals of the bets placed on each horse in a race, and the grand total of all bets, in the frenzied half hour before the race, when, at the larger racecourses, tens of thousands of bets would be placed at 100s of betting booths. Mechanical solutions to this problem were pioneered by Sir George Julius who formed the company Automatic Totalisators Ltd., operating from Sydney, Australia. Indeed, this year is the centenary of Julius' first machine which was set operating in Auckland, New Zealand in 1913.

Please join Bob Doran, Emeritus Professor of Computer Science at the University of Auckland, for a presentation on the history of a little-known application of large-scale mechanical calculating machines – the horse track betting machines pioneered by Sir George Julius a century ago.

Doran will also touch on the origins of the Pari-mutuel system, devised by Joseph Oller in the 1860s. Then the first generation of simple machines that started in the 1880s and the course-wide manual systems that were used well into the 20th century. Then he will look at Julius's first machine, its "Principles of Operation", and how it was developed into a reliable product that was widely used in the 1920s, culminating with the truly giant Longchamp totalisator installed in Paris in 1927 which had 293 on-line ticket-selling machines. He will also summarize some of the further developments, including dividend prediction, that took place over the years until the special-purpose machines were phased-out in the 1970s.
Jun 11, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
An Evening with IBM Research's Dr. John Kelly
Revolutionaries is the Museum's acclaimed speaker series distributed throughout the world on multiple platforms. It features renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

Tonight’s event is another in our series celebrating innovation at our research labs. Please join us.
Dr. John E. Kelly III is senior vice president and director of IBM Research. In this position he directs the worldwide operations of IBM Research, with approximately 3,000 scientists and technical employees at 12 laboratories in 10 countries around the world, and helps guide IBM’s overall technical strategy.

Dr. Kelly’s top priorities as head of IBM Research are to stimulate innovation in key areas of information technology, and quickly bring those innovations into the marketplace to sustain and grow IBM’s existing business; to create the new businesses of IBM’s future, and to apply these innovations to help IBM clients succeed.

IBM Research breakthroughs have helped to create and shape the world’s computing industry, while more recent breakthroughs, including Deep Blue computing systems, breaking the Petaflop barrier, and the introduction of Watson, the deep question answering natural-language computer system, are blazing the computing trails of the future.

Museum CEO John Hollar will moderate a fascinating conversation with Kelly on topics ranging from his background and the path that led him to IBM, the history of research there, IBM’s Watson and cognitive computing, to the newest lab in Nairobi, Kenya. Africa, IBM says, is destined to become an important growth market for the company. “Africa is a complex place,” Dr. Kelly said. "But we feel it is on the cusp, at an inflection point. It’s going to take off."

Revolutionaries is the Museum's acclaimed speaker series distributed throughout the world on multiple platforms. It features renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

Tonight’s event is another in our series celebrating innovation at our research labs. Please join us.
May 22, 2013 8:30 AM Speaker Series
Ethernet Innovation Summit Day Conference
Inspired by 40 Years of Ethernet Innovation
Ethernet Innovation Summit: Inspired by 40 Years of Ethernet Innovation
May 22nd 1973 was the day the Ethernet concept was first outlined in a memo from the young Bob Metcalfe at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) and, forty years on, this key moment in the history of human communications is being celebrated in the form of a two day Ethernet Innovation Summit looking at past, present and future innovations in networking. Tickets: $375 per person.
NetEvents is producing a fantastic event at the Computer History Museum to celebrate 40 years of Ethernet Innovation, take a look and book online now.

Ethernet Innovation Summit (May 22nd - Day):

Organized by PARC at Silicon Valley’s famous Computer History Museum. A great line-up of industry speakers from the "Ethernet Inventors" to future "Innovations in Networking." Meet Ethernet inventors Bob Metcalfe, Dave Boggs and other networking visionaries, pioneers and drivers and hear how todays innovations impact tomorrow business.

The cost to attend the day summit is $375 per person.

For a detailed agenda visit http://www.netevents.org.uk/ethernet-innovation-conference.

Computer History Museum members get 50% discount for the conference day pass!
Enter the code NE13EIS when registering.
May 22, 2013 8:30 AM Speaker Series
Ethernet 40th Birthday Party Celebrations
Ethernet Innovation Summit Evening
Ethernet 40th Birthday Party Celebrations and Charity Auction Awards Dinner (May 22nd - Evening):

“Ethernet Idol” Innovation Awards: From a short list of the industry’s most innovative and dynamic contenders, a team of analysts and IT industry gurus have eliminated all but their top three contestants. The three finalists will each make a brief presentation to the assembled dinner guests before a select panel of...
Ethernet 40th Birthday Party Celebrations and Charity Auction Awards Dinner (May 22nd - Evening):

“Ethernet Idol” Innovation Awards: From a short list of the industry’s most innovative and dynamic contenders, a team of analysts and IT industry gurus have eliminated all but their top three contestants. The three finalists will each make a brief presentation to the assembled dinner guests before a select panel of judges including representatives from PARC.

Celebrity auction in aid of STEM Education: We need more students that excel in science, math, technology and engineering to become contributors to the global technology marketplace. High-tech companies have vacancies due to a lack of qualified candidates, and the demand for scientists and mathematicians is projected to grow dramatically. Over 50% of US 8th graders receive instruction from a science and math teacher without a relevant degree or real world experience to inspire their students.

The Computer History Museum, as a 2012 STEM Innovation Award Winner, and HP Catalyst Initiative participant, is proud to raise money for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education by hosting tonight’s Ethernet Celebrity Auction.

Bids will help educate tomorrow’s innovators.
May 15, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Chroniclers of Technology: An Evening with David Kirkpatrick, Steven Levy & John Markoff
Chroniclers of Technology: An Evening with David Kirkpatrick, Steven Levy & John Markoff
Kirkpatrick, Levy and Markoff will take the stage with moderator John Hollar, to tell their personal versions of history gleaned from three decades covering one of the most riveting journalism beats on the planet.
David Kirkpatrick, Steven Levy and John Markoff are three of the most prolific tech writers in the country and have been friends for almost 30 years. Levy is a senior writer for Wired Magazine and the author of seven books, many of them bestsellers, on everything from computer hackers and cryptography to the inside stories of the iPod’s invention and Google’s birth. Kirkpatrick, long-time Fortune Magazine writer and now chairman of the Techonomy conferences, wrote the behind-the-scenes story of Facebook’s founding and explosive growth in the bestselling book "The Facebook Effect." Markoff, a senior writer for The New York Times, began writing about technology in 1976 and joined the Times in 1988.

Kirkpatrick, Levy and Markoff will take the stage with moderator John Hollar to tell their personal versions of history gleaned from three decades covering one of the most riveting journalism beats on the planet.

We are very pleased that KQED FM will be onsite taping this event for broadcast Wednesday, May 22 at 8pm.

Revolutionaries is the Museum's acclaimed speaker series distributed throughout the world on multiple platforms. It features renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
May 8, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead. Author Sheryl Sandberg in Conversation with Google's Eric Schmidt
Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead.
This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
For the past five years, I've sat at a desk next to Sheryl and I've learned something from her almost every day. She has a remarkable intelligence that can cut through complex processes and find solutions to the hardest problems. Lean In combines Sheryl’s ability to synthesize information with her understanding of how to get the best out of people. The book is smart and honest and funny. Her words will help all readers—especially men—to become better and more effective leaders.
- Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO, Facebook


Thirty years after women became 50 percent of the college graduates in the United States, men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in government and industry. This means that women’s voices are still not heard equally in the decisions that most affect our lives. In Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg examines why women's progress in achieving leadership roles has stalled, explains the root causes, and offers compelling, commonsense solutions that can empower women to achieve their full potential.

Sandberg is the chief operating officer of Facebook and is ranked on Fortune’s list of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Business and as one of Time's 100 Most Influential People in the World. In 2010, she gave an electrifying TEDTalk in which she described how women unintentionally hold themselves back in their careers. Her talk, which became a phenomenon and has been viewed more than two million times, encouraged women to "sit at the table," seek challenges, take risks, and pursue their goals with gusto.

Join Google's Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt as he moderates what is certain to be a fascinating conversation with Sandberg about women, leadership and so much more.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

We are very pleased that our partner Kepler's Books will be onsite before and after this event selling copies of Lean In.

And, we are very pleased that CSPAN Book TV will be onsite taping this event for future broadcast.
Apr 29, 2013 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Martian's Daughter: A Memoir. Author Marina von Neumann Whitman in conversation with John Hollar
The Martian's Daughter: A Memoir.  Author Marina von Neumann Whitman in conversation with John Hollar
Join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates a conversation with Whitman about her life with her father and her remarkable rise to become the first or highest-ranking woman in a variety of areas he unfortunately did not live to see.
"How did a young Hungarian immigrant and his daughter both become leading advisors to Presidents of the United States? This richly detailed memoir not only illuminates Marina von Neumann Whitman's ground-breaking life, but sheds long-awaited new light on her father, bringing us as close as we may ever get to the autobiography that John von Neumann never had the chance to write."
—George Dyson,
author of Darwin Among the Machines,
Project Orion, and Turing's Cathedral


One of the five Hungarian scientific geniuses dubbed "the Martians" by their colleagues, John von Neumann is often hailed as the greatest mathematician of the twentieth century and even as the greatest scientist after Einstein. He was a key figure in the Manhattan Project; the inventor of game theory; the pioneer developer of the modern stored-program electronic computer; and an adviser to the top echelons of the American military establishment. In The Martian's Daughter, Marina von Neumann Whitman reveals intimate details about the famed scientist and explores how the cosmopolitan environment in which she was immersed, the demanding expectations of her parents, and her own struggles to emerge from the shadow of a larger-than-life parent shaped her life and work.

Join Museum CEO John Hollar as he moderates a conversation with Whitman about her life with her father and her remarkable rise to become the first or highest-ranking woman in a variety of areas he unfortunately did not live to see.

The Computer History Museum is honored to host Marina von Neumann Whitman.

We are also very pleased that our partner, Kepler's, will be onsite selling copies of the Martian's Daughter before and after the program.

And, we are very pleased that C-SPAN Book TV will be onsite taping this event for future broadcast.
Apr 20, 2013 10:00 AM Special Events
CHM Presents
Hack the Future
Hack the Future is an all-day party / hackathon to show you what it's like to be a hacker and see if it's for you. We won't tell you what to do. You'll be free to work on whatever you want. We'll try to keep you from getting stuck, and we'll give you a place to start (if you want one). This is a unique opportunity to learn the state of the art in software and hardware design and engineering from mentors in Bay Area startups and companies like Facebook and Microsoft.
Are you a 5th-12th grade student who wants to learn about building stuff with computers and electronics than they teach you in school? Then it's time to start teaching yourself!

Hack the Future is an all-day party / hackathon to show you what it's like to be a hacker and see if it's for you. We won't tell you what to do. You'll be free to work on whatever you want. We'll try to keep you from getting stuck, and we'll give you a place to start (if you want one). This is a unique opportunity to learn the state of the art in software and hardware design and engineering from mentors in Bay Area startups and companies like Facebook and Microsoft.

Parents, don't reserve a ticket for yourself. We encourage you to let your children learn on their own!

We'll be serving snacks and beverages throughout the day, and we’ll also serve lunch. Every young hacker gets a one-of-a-kind Hack the Future 7 t-shirt with the awesome art shown, screen printed beautifully just for this event. Please remember that all young hackers should bring a laptop! Don’t leave home without one.
Apr 17, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Innovating the Future: SRI's Curt Carlson and Bill Mark in Conversation with John Markoff of The New York Times
Innovating the Future: SRI's Curt Carlson and Bill Mark in Conversation with John Markoff of The New York Times
This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
SRI International’s pioneering contributions to computing are legendary, from the invention of the computer mouse and interactive computing in the 1960s, to the first internetworked and wireless connections in the 1970s. Fast-forward to 2010, when SRI created the first-generation virtual personal assistant and sold Siri to Apple.

Over 66 years, SRI has conducted billions of dollars of R&D and has created enormous value through spin-off ventures such as Nuance and Intuitive Surgical. Other innovations include new cancer drugs, digital math curriculum to help students break through algebra and move on to higher math, and much more. How does SRI do it, while many powerhouse corporate research labs have disappeared?

John Markoff of The New York Times will explore SRI, beginning with a conversation with William Mark, Vice President of Information and Computing Sciences. Hear what Mark and his researchers are imagining and turning into reality: from virtual personal assistants capable of human-like dialogue, to next-generation textbooks that use artificial intelligence, and human-machine interfaces that anticipate your moves.

To learn how SRI moves its research from the laboratory into the marketplace, they will be joined on stage by SRI’s President and CEO Curt Carlson. Carlson will offer a unique definition of innovation and discuss its importance in government policy, education, and U.S. competitiveness.

We hope you’ll join us for another compelling conversation led by John Markoff, who is our moderator-in-chief for this track examining and celebrating innovation at research labs.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

We are very pleased that KQED FM will be onsite taping this event for broadcast Wednesday, April 24 at 8pm.

And, we are also pleased that CSPAN will be onsite taping this event for future broadcast.
Mar 14, 2013 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America Author Ernest Freeberg in conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Author Ernest Freeberg in conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Please join us as we welcome Ernest Freeberg, the distinguished professor and historian, for a conversation with John Hollar about the technological revolution Edison’s light bulb unleashed.
The late nineteenth century was a period of explosive technological creativity, but arguably the most important invention of all was Thomas Edison’s incandescent light bulb. Unveiled in his Menlo Park, New Jersey, laboratory in 1879, the light bulb overwhelmed the American public with the sense of the birth of a new age. More than any other invention, the electric light marked the arrival of modernity.

The Age of Edison places the story of Edison’s invention in the context of a technological revolution that transformed America and Europe in these decades. Edison and his fellow inventors emerged from a culture shaped by broad public education, a lively popular press that took an interest in science and technology, and an American patent system that encouraged innovation and democratized the benefits of invention. And in the end, as Freeberg shows, Edison’s greatest invention was not any single technology, but rather his reinvention of the process itself.

Freeberg weaves a narrative that reaches from Coney Island and Broadway to the tiniest towns of rural America, tracing the progress of electric light through the reactions of everyone who saw it. It is a quintessentially American story of ingenuity, ambition, and possibility, in which the greater forces of progress and change are made visible by one of our most humble and ubiquitous objects.

Please join us as we welcome Ernest Freeberg, the distinguished professor and historian, for a conversation with John Hollar about the technological revolution Edison's light bulb unleashed.

We are very pleased that KQED FM will be onsite taping this event for broadcast Thursday, April 11 at 8pm. Additionally, C-SPAN Book TV will be onsite taping this event for future broadcast.

Our partner Kepler's Books will be on hand selling copies of the Age of Edison before and after this event, with a author book signing to follow.
Mar 11, 2013 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
“I Think, Therefore I Am”

IBM Fellow Grady Booch on Computing: The Human Experience
In this lecture, IBM Fellow Grady Booch explores the development of intelligent computers as projections of what we both dream and what we fear. We examine what it means to be intelligent, and take a journey through past and future approaches to building sentient software-intensive systems. Some such as Minsky believe the mind to be computable; others such as Penrose do not. In the end, we are compelled to consider the question of what it means to be human: producing even the illusion of the mind raises profound questions as to their personhood and our relationship to these machines.
Computational intelligence is the manifest destiny of computer science.
- Ed Feigenbaum

Is the mind computable? Can we build sentient machines? What are the implications for humanity if we can?

The human race may be singular, unique across all of time and space. It may be just one of multitudes. Most likely, however, it is an extremely rare thing, an exquisitely precious consequence of the unfolding of the laws of the universe. Still, one truth that we can assert with confidence is that we are. We are self-aware; we know that we know we exist. There is within humanity a drive to recreate itself, to be as a god to things we create in our own image. From the Golem of Jewish mythology, to Leonardo’s robot, to the contemporary Kenshiro robot, we project our hopes and our fears into cunning mechanism that mirror us. While these anthropomorphic robots are interesting (and perhaps a bit creepy), there is a less visible revolution taking place in cognitive computing, whose advances are not only helping us better understand the operation of the human brain, they are leading us to create the illusion of sentience.

In this lecture, IBM Fellow Grady Booch explores the development of intelligent computers as projections of what we both dream and what we fear. We examine what it means to be intelligent, and take a journey through past and future approaches to building sentient software-intensive systems. Some such as Minsky believe the mind to be computable; others such as Penrose do not. In the end, we are compelled to consider the question of what it means to be human: producing even the illusion of the mind raises profound questions as to their personhood and our relationship to these machines.


This lecture is the second in a series for Computing: The Human Experience, a transmedia project directed to the general public that explores the co-evolution of computing and humanity. Presented by IBM Fellow Grady Booch, Computing teaches the essential science of computing, presents the stories of the people, events, and inventions of computing, examines the connection among computing, science, and society, and contemplates the future. Computing has played a fundamental role in the advancement of the human spirit, encompassing war, commerce, the arts, science, society, and faith and so this series takes us on a journey that examines the complex dance between computing and the human experience.
Feb 19, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Citizenville: How to Take the Town Square Digital and Reinvent Government
Author Gavin Newsom in Conversation with KQED’s Michael Krasny
Citizenville:  How to Take the Town Square Digital and Reinvent Government
Revolutionaries is the Museum’s acclaimed speaker series distributed throughout the world on multiple platforms. It features renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
By integrating democratic government with cutting-edge American innovation, the lieutenant governor of California charts a bright future for open-source America

Citizenville is the story of how ordinary citizens can use new digital tools to dissolve political gridlock and transform American democracy. As social networking and smart phones have changed the way we communicate with one another, these technologies are also changing our relationship with government.

Drawing on wide-ranging interviews with thinkers and politicians, Citizenville is the first book by Lieutenant Governor Newsom. He broke new ground as the mayor of San Francisco, one of the most high-tech, experimental, and progressive municipalities in the nation. But when Newsom’s tenure as mayor began, he found that San Francisco was behind the likes of Estonia and South Korea in terms of digital governance. Newsom’s quest to modernize one of America’s most modern cities—and the amazing results he achieves—form the backbone of this far-reaching book.

Lieutenant Governor Newsom explains how the problems of twenty-first-century America are too big and too expensive for the government simply to buy solutions. Instead, we must innovate our way out. Just as the post office and the highway system provide public infrastructure to channel both personal and private enterprise—a platform upon which citizens can grow—so too could a modern digital government house the needs, concerns, information, and collaboration of an enlightened digital citizenry.

KQED’s Forum host Michael Krasny will do moderating honors tonight. The Museum is proud to welcome California’s Lieutenant Governor and Michael Krasny to our stage for what is certain to be a captivating conversation. Please join us.

Our partner Kepler’s Books will be on-site selling copies of Citizenville before and after the program. Gavin Newsom will be signing books immediately following the program's end.

We are very pleased that C-SPAN's Book TV will be on-site taping this event for future broadcast.

Revolutionaries is the Museum’s acclaimed speaker series distributed throughout the world on multiple platforms. It features renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling, educational conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences gain insight into the remarkable process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.


We are very pleased that KQED FM will be onsite taping this event for broadcast on March 6 at 8pm.
Jan 29, 2013 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Author David Alan Grier on The Company We Keep
Following up on 2009’s Too Soon to Tell, The Company We Keep is a second compilation of essays based on and growing out of “The Known World” column in Computer magazine. Like the original column, this collection explores the human side of how technology is developed, deployed, and used.
Following up on 2009’s Too Soon to Tell, The Company We Keep is a second compilation of essays based on and growing out of "The Known World" column in Computer magazine. Like the original column, this collection explores the human side of how technology is developed, deployed, and used.

The book examines the development of digital technology by describing how this technology affects the communities that build, adapt, govern, and dispose of it. Centering on Washington, DC, many of the essays use Washington not only as an example of a community but also as a metaphor for how computing technology has connected individuals more closely and more firmly to the centers of political power, economic power, social power, and cultural power.

We are pleased to welcome David back to the Museum. He will discuss how this book came to be and do some readings for us as well. Please plan to join us.

David will be signing copies of his book immediately following the program’s end.
Jan 22, 2013 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
An Evening with Elon Musk
An Evening with Elon Musk
Join Alison van Diggelen of Fresh Dialogues for a lively conversation with Elon Musk about what inspired his entrepreneurial journey from South Africa to Silicon Valley; the lessons he learned at PayPal, Tesla Motors, SpaceX and SolarCity; and how he manages to lead two ground-breaking companies simultaneously. Why does he believe that electric cars are a vital component in the move away from oil to a more sustainable energy economy? And what is behind his fascination with creating a multiplanetary future for mankind, including a self-sustaining base on Mars?
I could either watch it happen or be part of it.
Elon Musk on joining the Internet Revolution

If you had a chance to go back in time and work with Howard Hughes when he was creating TWA, if you had a chance to be there at that moment when it was the dawn of a brand new era, wouldn’t you want to do that? That's why I'm here.
Dr. Garrett E. Reisman
NASA Astronaut (former) and Senior Engineer, SpaceX
On CBS' 60 Minutes March 16, 2012



Elon Musk is living two ultimate boyhood fantasies: creating a sports car company and a rocket launch corporation. As co-founder of PayPal, Musk helped transform payment online systems and then, like a true revolutionary, set his sights on electric cars and space transport.

Today Elon Musk is CEO of both Tesla Motors and SpaceX. He also serves as chairman of SolarCity, the solar power provider.

In 2008, Musk was named as one of the 75 most influential people of the 21st century by Esquire magazine and one year later, the National Space Society awarded Musk their Von Braun Trophy, given for leadership of the most significant achievement in space. In 2010, Musk was the youngest recipient of the Auto Executive of the Year Innovator Award and was listed as one of Time Magazine's 100 of the World’s Most Influential People. His life story was the inspiration for the Iron Man movies about an executive turned space hero.

Join Alison van Diggelen of Fresh Dialogues for a lively conversation with Elon Musk about what inspired his entrepreneurial journey from South Africa to Silicon Valley; the lessons he learned at PayPal, Tesla Motors, SpaceX and SolarCity; and how he manages to lead two ground-breaking companies simultaneously. Why does he believe that electric cars are a vital component in the move away from oil to a more sustainable energy economy? And what is behind his fascination with creating a multiplanetary future for mankind, including a self-sustaining base on Mars?

This event launches our 2013 Revolutionaries speaker series and promises to be an inspiring and educational evening.

The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum's permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.

We are very pleased that KQED FM will be onsite taping this event for broadcast Thursday, January 24 at 8pm.
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2012 Events

Nov 14, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
An Evening with Google's Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt
An Evening with Google's Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt
This event is part of the Computer History Museum’s acclaimed speaker series Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling and educational conversations about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Since joining Google in 2001, Eric Schmidt has helped grow the company from a Silicon Valley startup to a global leader in technology. As executive chairman, he is responsible for the external matters of Google: building partnerships and broader business relationships, government outreach and technology thought leadership, as well as advising the CEO and senior leadership on business and policy issues. What does Schmidt see as the future of the internet giant, and how is Google changing to meet that vision?

Join us tonight for a wide-ranging conversation with Schmidt moderated by Museum CEO John Hollar.

This event is part of the Computer History Museum’s acclaimed speaker series Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling and educational conversations about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

We are very pleased that KQED FM is going to be onsite taping this event for broadcast on Thursday, December 6 at 8pm.
Nov 7, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Game Changers: Mark Cerny with EA's Rich Hilleman
Game Changers: Mark Cerny with EA's Rich Hilleman
This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Mark Cerny is one of gaming's most influential designers, a true "game changer." He's received the International Game Developers Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award, as well as been inducted into the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences' Hall of Fame.

Mark Cerny joined Atari at the age of 17, and in a career spanning over thirty years has worked variously as a game designer, programmer, producer and business executive. His first major success was the classic arcade game "Marble Madness"; he subsequently made the transition to console games, working for Sega in the U.S. and Japan, and eventually serving as president of Universal Studio's games division. He is now the president and founder of Cerny Games, a game design consultancy that has contributed to the release of no fewer than 14 million-selling titles, including "Ratchet & Clank" and "Uncharted: Drake’s Fortune".

Tonight join Electronic Arts' 20th employee and now Chief Creative Director, Rich Hilleman, for a wide-ranging conversation with Cerny about his life and times in the gaming industry, and his thinking about the state of the industry - from frustratingly difficult games to play to Hollywood's impact on games. Hilleman knows Cerny quite well, so this is certain to be an intelligent, insightful conversation between two industry trailblazers.

This event kicks off a Game Changers track within our Revolutionaries speaker series. Rich Hilleman has agreed to moderate these conversations with gaming industry legends.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Nov 1, 2012 11:00 AM Special Events
25th Anniversary Panel Discussion and Luncheon
SPARC at 25: Past, Present and Future
Presented by the Computer History Museum Semiconductor Special Interest Group
This panel will discuss the origins and evolution of the SPARC processor on its 25th anniversary. When a small startup -- Sun Microsystems -- decided to develop their own microprocessor in the mid 1980's, it chose a Reduced Instruction Set Computers (RISC) architecture. The 1987 debut of the Sun-4, the first SPARC based computer, ignited meteoric growth at Sun and ultimately transformed the industry. The panelists will recollect the technical and business challenges of this revolutionary path, the risks and rewards of the development of multiple generations of increasingly complex chips, and the critical role of software. The panel will also address the current state of the market, and speculate on future challenges and opportunities.
This panel will discuss the origins and evolution of the SPARC processor on its 25th anniversary. When a small startup -- Sun Microsystems -- decided to develop their own microprocessor in the mid 1980's, it chose a Reduced Instruction Set Computers (RISC) architecture. The 1987 debut of the Sun-4, the first SPARC based computer, ignited meteoric growth at Sun and ultimately transformed the industry. The panelists will recollect the technical and business challenges of this revolutionary path, the risks and rewards of the development of multiple generations of increasingly complex chips, and the critical role of software. The panel will also address the current state of the market, and speculate on future challenges and opportunities.
Oct 27, 2012 1:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM, Big Picture Science and Bay Area Science Festival Present
Doomsday Show
Join us for a live production of the Big Picture Science podcast and radio show as scientists separate fact from fiction in end-of-world scenarios. From hoopla over the 2012 doomsday prophesy to asteroid strikes, computer sentience, and climate change, we’ll interview top scientists on stage about the spectacular predictions about the end of the world as well as scientific theories about how it might end.
Will the world end in fire … or in ice … or will it end at the hands of our computer overlords?

Join us for a live production of the Big Picture Science podcast and radio show as scientists separate fact from fiction in end-of-world scenarios.

From hoopla over the 2012 doomsday prophesy to asteroid strikes, computer sentience, and climate change, we’ll interview top scientists on stage about the spectacular predictions about the end of the world as well as scientific theories about how it might end.

Be in the audience and watch this national radio show come together - interviews, skits, miscues and all - followed by a discussion with the scientists. This is your chance to ask about the disaster scenario that gives you insomnia and hear just how likely it is to occur.

Doomsday: Be a Part of it … if it’s the Last Thing You Do.


The Computer History Museum is proud to co-host this program on the first day of the 2012 Bay Area Science Festival!
Oct 16, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Microsoft Research's Rick Rashid in Conversation with John Markoff of The New York Times
This is another event in a series designed to give our audiences unique insight into the remarkable work being done in research labs around the world – a celebration of innovation. The Museum is most grateful to John Markoff for offering to participate in many of these conversations.
As Chief Research Officer, Richard (Rick) F. Rashid oversees worldwide operations for Microsoft Research, the largest computer science research organization in the world, encompassing more than 850 researchers across eleven global labs. Under Rashid's leadership, Microsoft Research conducts both basic and applied research across disciplines that include algorithms and theory; human-computer interaction; machine learning; multimedia and graphics; search; security; social computing; and systems, architecture, mobility and networking. His team collaborates with the world's foremost researchers in academia, industry and government on initiatives to expand the state of the art across the breadth of computing and to help ensure the future of Microsoft's products.

Before joining Microsoft, Rashid was professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), where he directed the design and implementation of several influential network operating systems and published extensively about computer vision, operating systems, network protocols and communications security. During his tenure, Rashid developed the Mach multiprocessor operating system, which has been influential in the design of modern operating systems and remains at the core of several commercial systems.

John Markoff of The New York Times has known Rick Rashid for many years and will moderate a wide-ranging conversation with him about his beginnings, influences (Star Trek!), mentors and career at Microsoft. We’ll also learn more about his vision for Microsoft Research twenty years into his leadership role.

This is another event in a series designed to give our audiences unique insight into the remarkable work being done in research labs around the world – a celebration of innovation. The Museum is most grateful to John Markoff for offering to participate in many of these conversations.

This event is part of the Computer History Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Sep 13, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
The Financial Times and CHM Present: The Anthropology of Innovation
This event is part of the Computer History Museum's acclaimed speaker series Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling and educational conversations about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
an•thro•pol•o•gy [an-thruh-pol-uh-jee]
The science that deals with the origins, physical and cultural development, biological characteristics, and social customs and beliefs of humankind.


Silos and silo-busting - the secret of innovation
The 21st century world is marked by a profound paradox. On the one hand we are more interconnected than ever before, in the sense that we now live and operate in systems that are tightly entwined. But on the other hand, we also live at a time of great intellectual and social polarization - or silos - and social media is making some of this fracture worse, by encouraging the development of intellectual echo chambers.

The presence of silos inside organizations can often be deadly; the financial industry is a case in point. But groups or people who can "silo bust" - or jump across boundaries and categories - are often extremely innovative; indeed, much of the modern innovation that has occurred in recent years has arisen because of the ability of people to silo bust.

What are the key perils of silos and what do anthropologists have to say about the existence and trap of silos today? How can organizations silo-bust effectively?

Join award-winning journalist (and anthropologist) Gillian Tett and her panel to find the answers to these questions and many more.

This event is part of the Computer History Museum's acclaimed speaker series Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with renowned innovators, business and technology leaders and authors in enthralling and educational conversations about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.
Aug 20, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents:
Data Storage in the Flash Memory Revolution
Please join us as we welcome physicist, inventor and entrepreneur Dr. Eli Harari. He will be interviewed about his life’s journey from Israel to the UK, and then coming to America to study at Princeton and work in Silicon Valley. This journey culminated in the inventions that led to the use of Flash Memory for data storage, an essential component of every significant...
Please join us as we welcome physicist, inventor and entrepreneur Dr. Eli Harari. He will be interviewed about his life’s journey from Israel to the UK, and then coming to America to study at Princeton and work in Silicon Valley. This journey culminated in the inventions that led to the use of Flash Memory for data storage, an essential component of every significant consumer electronics product on the market today.

Technology developed by Eli at Hughes Microelectronics in the 1970s led to the industry’s first commercial floating gate electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) in 1978. This same technology is essential to NAND Flash, a technology introduced by Toshiba in 1987. In 1989, Eli developed the System Flash architecture, which combined a processor, firmware and Flash Memory to fully emulate a disk drive. System Flash was the genesis of SanDisk, a company Eli co-founded that same year. While a simple-sounding concept, many obstacles had to be overcome before this architecture could made its mark in the marketplace. The System Flash concept is now married to NAND Flash Memory, and it has enabled an inexpensive, low-power and compact data storage medium that is the foundation of an industry expected to exceed $33 billion in sales in 2012.

The dramatic impact of Eli’s inventions was recognized by the IEEE History Committee in the form of an IEEE Milestone that will be dedicated tonight by IEEE President Dr. Gordon Day. The title of the Milestone is The Floating Gate EEPROM, and its citation reads

“From 1976-1978, at Hughes Microelectronics in Newport Beach, California, the practicality, reliability, manufacturability and endurance of the Floating Gate EEPROM -- an electrically erasable device using a thin gate oxide and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling for writing and erasing -- was proven. As a significant foundation of data storage in flash memory, this fostered new classes of portable computing and communication devices which allow ubiquitous personal access to data.”

A special video, funded in part by local IEEE sections and chapters, will be shown which describes the IEEE Milestone program as well as this EEPROM/Flash Memory Milestone.
Aug 8, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
The Art & Technology Behind Google Doodles
The Art & Technology Behind Google Doodles
Tonight we will meet members of the doodle team and get a behind-the-scenes look at their creative process. They will discuss how technology’s evolution has enabled them to create more beautiful and highly interactive doodles, and the challenge that brings to the technical members of the team. We will also find out about possible risks and rewards involved when one’s "canvas" is viewed by millions worldwide.
Doodles are the fun, surprising and sometimes spontaneous changes that are made to the Google logo to celebrate holidays, anniversaries and the lives of famous artists, pioneers and scientists.

In 1998, before the company was even incorporated, the concept of the doodle was born when Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin played with the corporate logo to indicate their attendance at the Burning Man festival in the Nevada desert. Two years later, in 2000, Larry and Sergey asked an intern to produce a doodle for Bastille Day which was so well received by users that a chief doodler was appointed, and doodles started showing up more and more regularly on the Google homepage.

Over time, the demand for doodles has risen in the US and internationally. Creating doodles is now the responsibility of a team of talented illustrators (called doodlers) and engineers. For them, creating doodles has become a group effort to enliven the Google homepage and bring smiles to the faces of Google users around the world.

Tonight we will meet members of the doodle team and get a behind-the-scenes look at their creative process. They will discuss how technology’s evolution has enabled them to create more beautiful and highly interactive doodles, and the challenge that brings to the technical members of the team. We will also find out about possible risks and rewards involved when one’s "canvas" is viewed by millions worldwide.

John Hollar will be our moderator for what is certain to be an entertaining and inspirational evening. Please join us.

This event is part of our continuing Revolutionaries lecture series, featuring conversations with some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field.

This event is a part of the ZERO1 Biennial: Seeking Silicon Valley conference. Some of the most brilliant minds in contemporary art, technology, science and architecture come together for one of the world’s only Biennials to focus on the convergence of contemporary art and technology. Opening week includes a nighttime street festival, urban screen, public art, artist talks and more, with Biennial events continuing into December with over 150 artists, 45 partners and a network of exhibitions, performances, public art and programs throughout the Bay Area. For more information visit zero1biennial.org
Jul 31, 2012 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Insanely Simple: The Obsession That Drives Apple's Success. Author Ken Segall in conversation with TIME's Harry McCracken
Insanely Simple: The Obsession That Drives Apple's Success
Many people consider Apple the most powerful brand in the world – an accolade that’s hard to dispute when its product line includes iPad, iPod, iPhone, iMac and MacBook Air. Companies all over the world try to emulate Apple’s creative genius and groundbreaking marketing. But what is the real secret to Apple’s success? According to Ken Segall, the man who put the...
Many people consider Apple the most powerful brand in the world – an accolade that’s hard to dispute when its product line includes iPad, the iPod, iPhone, iMac and MacBook Air. Companies all over the world try to emulate Apple’s creative genius and groundbreaking marketing. But what is the real secret to Apple’s success? According to Ken Segall, the man who put the “i” in iMac and served as a member of Steve Jobs’ creative inner circle for more than a decade, the answer is: simplicity.

Segall’s book reveals what sets Apple apart from other technology companies and makes it stand out in a complicated world: a deep, almost religious belief in the power of simplicity. The purest expression of Steve Jobs’ unique viewpoint, it’s apparent in everything Apple does, from product design to advertising.

Serving as Jobs’ ad agency creative director for both NeXT and Apple, Segall led the team that created Apple’s legendary Think Different campaign, which was an integral part of Apple’s transformation following Jobs’ return. Segall's other clients have included technology giants such as Dell, Intel and IBM as well as consumer brands such as JCPenney.

Harry McCracken, TIME's Editor-at-large, has covered the technology beat for two decades, writing about the Web, mobile technology, consumer electronics and PCs for PC World, Macworld, CNET, and his own site, Technologizer. He will moderate a discussion with Segall about Apple, Steve Jobs and the art of marketing technology to the masses, from the inside out.

Please join us for a revealing and informative program!

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on site to tape this event for future broadcast.

We are pleased that Kepler’s will be on site selling copies of Insanely Simple before and after the program.
Jul 24, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
DARPA's Dan Kaufman in Conversation with John Markoff of The New York Times
This event is part of our 2012 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum's permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
Imagine what the world would look like if we gave everyone the ability to solve its toughest problems, the freedom to explore the world, and the tools to build the future. These are ideas that have been driving Dan Kaufman and his research efforts at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). He is convinced that if we build the tools and technology to empower everyone to participate, we would be amazed at the results.

Recently at DARPA there have been multiple efforts to research the mobilization and self-organization potential of social networks & crowd sourcing. Two interesting questions arise: can you use the power of the crowd to solve a specific problem, and can you find special people in the crowd to solve a problem who have never been asked before?

The power of the crowd has been explored through DARPA's Network Challenge (commonly referred to as the Red Balloon Challenge) in which 10 large red weather balloons were placed at undisclosed locations across the US for one day.

Finding people in the crowd who can contribute greatly has been explored through a recent DARPA sponsored experiment called the Shredder Challenge. In this test, the winning solution was not resolved by the "power of the crowd," but by finding, in the crowd, those special people who may have never been asked the question. Many thought the task impossible, but it turned out that they had been asking the wrong people.

An obstacle to fully empowering the crowd is the need for software programmers. DARPA has pushed to develop tools that allow ordinary people to solve complex problems. The program RealWorld gave tools to U.S. soldiers to allow them to create their own mission-specific simulations, without expertise in computer programming. Those tools have now been used to build aircraft, medical, and neurological simulators.

John Markoff has referred to DARPA as an "Agency of Wonder" – join us tonight to find out why.

This event is part of our 2012 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum's permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
Jun 27, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Transforming Music: From Guitar Hero to Robotic Opera & Beyond
Transforming Music: From Guitar Hero to Robotic Opera & Beyond
Join us for an evening with musician, inventor and educator Tod Machover, the Muriel R. Cooper Professor of Music & Media at the MIT Media Lab, where he directs the Opera of the Future Group. An influential composer, he has been praised for creating music that breaks traditional artistic and cultural boundaries; his music has been performed and commissioned by some of the world’s most important performers and ensembles. He has also created the technologies behind Guitar Hero and Rock Band.
Music exerts its power when we are actively engaged, not when we listen subliminally. For this reason, I have been working with my group at the MIT Media Lab to create musical tools – often with specially designed technologies – that enable everyone to participate directly in music-making regardless of background.
Tod Machover


Tod Machover is the only person I am aware of who contributes on a world-class level to both the technology of music creation and to music itself. Even within these two distinct areas, his contributions are remarkably diverse, and of exquisite quality.
Ray Kurzweil


Join us for an evening with musician, inventor and educator Tod Machover, the Muriel R. Cooper Professor of Music & Media at the MIT Media Lab, where he directs the Opera of the Future Group. An influential composer, he has been praised for creating music that breaks traditional artistic and cultural boundaries; his music has been performed and commissioned by some of the world's most important performers and ensembles. He has also created the technologies behind Guitar Hero and Rock Band.

Machover's opera Death and the Powers premiered in Monte-Carlo in the fall 2010. The project was developed by a creative team of international artists, designers, writers and theatrical luminaries, as well as by an interdisciplinary team of Media Lab graduate and undergraduate students. Powers features a robotic, animatronic stage – the first of its kind – that gradually "comes alive" as the opera's main character.

The Museum's John Hollar will moderate a fascinating conversation with Tod - the son of a noted piano teacher and a computer graphics pioneer - who is using technology to revolutionize music.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be on site to tape this event for future broadcast.

This event is part of our 2012 Revolutionaries lecture series, featuring conversations with some of the most distinguished minds in the computing field.

Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
Everyone uses computers. Few know the story of how they came to be. Revolution chronicles the evolution and impact of modern computing from the abacus to the smart phone. This 25,000 sq ft multimedia experience is a technological wonderland that immerses visitors in the sights, sounds, and stories of the computer revolution.
Jun 18, 2012 5:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Driving Innovation: Detroit Comes to Silicon Valley - An Evening with Bill Ford
Driving Innovation: Detroit Comes to Silicon Valley -- An Evening with Bill Ford
We look forward to welcoming Bill Ford to the Computer History Museum for a conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar about Ford's dedication to mobility, his lifelong dedication to sustainability, and Ford's evolution from a car company into a 21st century experience company.
History shows that the evolutionary road of a century-old company often leads directly through Silicon Valley. Ford Motor Company, founded in 1903, is now tapping directly into the Valley’s brand of innovation and design with the opening of a new research lab. What is the aim of Ford’s entry into this epicenter of creativity, and how does it fit with Ford’s strategic future?

Bill Ford, executive chairman, has been an outspoken advocate of Ford’s embrace of new technology for both sustainability and mobility. Ford, the great-grandson of the legendary Henry Ford, has focused much of Ford’s strategy on building smarter, connected and technology-centric automobiles that use real-time computing for everything from engine control to network communications.

In February, he was the first global auto executive to deliver a keynote address at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, where he described his vision of the modern automobile as a "mobile platform." Ford sees a world where the car of the future moves through a globally connected communications and transportation grid. He warned of an alternative future of "global gridlock" and also expanded on his view of automobiles made more sustainable through technology.

Bill Ford's vision has been at work for years. For nearly a decade, Ford has been working with technology companies like Microsoft, co-developer of the advanced in-car communication system Ford SYNC, and the MyFord Touch interface. With the promise of vehicle-to-vehicle communications, crowdsourcing and cloud-connected cars, Ford seeks to inaugurate a new age of ubiquitous connectivity. When the car becomes a platform for software developers, what might the future hold?

One hundred years ago, the automobile redefined personal mobility. Over the last decade, innovation in Silicon Valley redefined how we communicate as a society. I am excited to be part of the convergence of Silicon Valley and Detroit to not only further our vehicle technology but also to work toward creating a new, smarter and sustainable transportation ecosystem.
Bill Ford, Executive Chairman, Ford Motor Company


We look forward to welcoming Bill Ford to the Computer History Museum for a conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar about Ford’s dedication to mobility, his lifelong dedication to sustainability, and Ford’s evolution from a car company into a 21st century experience company.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be onsite taping this lecture for future broadcast.

This event is part of our 2012 Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring conversations with some of the most distinguished minds in the computer business. The Revolutionaries speaker series complements the opening of the Museum's permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
Jun 12, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Doing Well by Doing Good: A Conversation with Matthew Flannery and John Wood, moderated by KQED’s Dave Iverson
Doing Well by Doing Good:  A Conversation with Matthew Flannery and John Wood
Join KQED's Dave Iverson for an inspiring, educational and thought-provoking conversation with two leading social entrepreneurs.

This event is part of our 2012 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum's permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
The man who dies rich, dies disgraced
Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919)

Andrew Carnegie made a fortune in steel. His net worth was roughly $300 billion in today’s dollars. Then he gave it all away, mostly to build schools, universities, museums and libraries. When Carnegie died, his last $30 million went to charities, foundations and pensioners. Carnegie believed that philanthropy was the only reason to amass an enormous fortune.

Today, we're creating more wealth than at any time in history. Who are today's Carnegies? They're called social entrepreneurs. They combine a passion for inciting social change with the tough discipline of a global corporation. It's about creating innovative products and services to address desperate human needs – and insisting on long-term, measurable results. Can social entrepreneurship reduce illiteracy, disease, malnutrition, environmental degradation and other pressing ills?

Matt Flannery and John Wood are coming to the Computer History Museum to share their first-hand experiences in using business tactics to do good works. Matt began developing Kiva in late 2004 as a side-project while working as a computer programmer at TiVo, Inc. Former Microsoft executive John Wood founded Room to Read, which publishes and supplies books, builds libraries and schools, and provides scholarships for girls to developing countries. It's a classic bottom-up strategy based on Woods’ belief that world change starts with educated children. He told his story in a bestselling memoir, Leaving Microsoft to Change the World.

These two Revolutionaries share a background as successful technology entrepreneurs who made the transition to becoming successful social entrepreneurs. How and why did they do it? What traits and skills were transferable, which were not? Is there something endemic about the technology industry that generates so many of these 21st century philanthropists? What qualities do they think are crucial to bringing about social change? And, what advice would they give to the next generation – of both technology and social entrepreneurs?

Join KQED's Dave Iverson for an inspiring, educational and thought-provoking conversation with two leading social entrepreneurs.

KQED Radio will be on-site to tape this event and will broadcast and live stream it Saturday, June 16 at 3pm.

This event is part of our 2012 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum's permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
May 9, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
From the UNIVAC to Web 2.0: Politics, Computers and the Making of a 21st Century Presidency
From the UNIVAC to Web 2.0: Politics, Computers and the Making of a 21st Century Presidency
This event is part of our 2012 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
What we are seeing in the world is the balance of power shifting. The old rules just don’t always apply anymore and a lot of the new rules are being written by people that don’t even know they are writing them.
Sheryl Sandberg, Chief Operating Officer, Facebook
Digital Life Design Conference Keynote
January 24, 2012


Dateline: November 4, 1952: UNIVAC Predicts an Eisenhower Win! Sixty years ago this November, public opinion polls gave the 1952 Presidential election to Adlai Stevenson. UNIVAC, star of CBS’ election coverage (along with a new anchor, Walter Cronkite), predicted an Eisenhower landslide. UNIVAC was right. The computer’s TV debut captivated an audience already enthralled by technology and confronting new tools—and new terminology—almost daily. "UNIVAC" became synonymous with "computer" for a generation of Americans.

Although much has changed since 1952, technology and politics remain closely intertwined. We’ll look at the history of using computing to poll and predict election outcomes, as well as how campaigns have used technology, as the Obama team did in 2008, to win elections. What are the implications of technology-driven campaigns and the electorate’s use of social media on our republic? What are the positives and negatives associated with all of this connectivity?

The panel will also look beyond U.S. borders to discuss the possible ramifications of the Arab Spring and whether other global political shifts may be looming. Easy, global access to social media tools has definitely created a power shift – from institutions to individuals. But what does that shift really mean – what are the larger implications to global stability?

Please join us for compelling discussion led by our moderator, Richard Tedlow, and his distinguished panel. We plan to make use of social media ourselves to capture your questions for the panel in the days leading up to the event.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be onsite taping this event for future broadcast. We are also very pleased that C-SPAN will be taping this event and will broadcast as part of their prime time coverage in the coming weeks.

This event is part of our 2012 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum's permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
Mar 28, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation. Author Jon Gertner in conversation with KQED's Dave Iverson
The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation
This event is part of our 2012 Revolutionaries series, featuring conversations with some of the most distinguished minds in the computing field. Join author Jon Gertner for a fascinating conversation with KQED's Dave Iverson about the people and history of Bell Labs, and the ways it fostered a culture of innovation and ideas.
Bell Laboratories, which thrived from the 1920s to the 1980s, was the most innovative and productive institution of the twentieth century. Long before America's brightest scientific minds began migrating west to Silicon Valley, they flocked to this sylvan campus in the New Jersey suburbs built and funded by AT&T. At its peak, Bell Labs employed nearly fifteen thousand people, twelve hundred of whom had PhDs. Thirteen would go on to win Nobel prizes. It was a citadel of science and scholarship as well as a hotbed of creative thinking. It was, in effect, a factory of ideas whose workings have remained largely hidden until now.

New York Times Magazine writer Jon Gertner unveils the unique magic of Bell Labs through the eyes and actions of its scientists. These ingenious, often eccentric men would become revolutionaries, and sometimes legends, whether for inventing radio astronomy in their spare time (and on the company's dime), riding unicycles through the corridors, or pioneering the principles that propel today's technology. In these pages, we learn how radar came to be, and lasers, transistors, satellites, mobile phones, and much more.

Even more important, Gertner reveals the forces that set off this explosion of creativity. Bell Labs combined the best aspects of the academic and corporate worlds, hiring the brightest and usually the youngest minds, creating a culture and even an architecture that forced employees in different fields to work together, in virtually complete intellectual freedom, with little pressure to create moneymaking innovations. In Gertner's portrait, we come to understand why both researchers and business leaders look to Bell Labs as a model and long to incorporate its magic into their own work.

Join author Jon Gertner for a fascinating conversation with KQED’s Dave Iverson about the people and history of Bell Labs, and the ways it fostered a culture of innovation and ideas.

Our partner Kepler's Books will be on-site selling copies of Idea Factory before and after this event.

We are very pleased that C-SPAN's Book TV will be taping this event for future broadcast.

We are also pleased that KQED Radio will be onsite to tape this event and broadcast it on April 4 at 8pm.

This event is part of our 2012 Revolutionaries series, featuring conversations with some of the most distinguished minds in the computing field. Be sure to visit our exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing. It is rich with images, artifacts and stories of the people and innovations of Bell Labs.
Mar 7, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Turing's Cathedral. Author George Dyson in Conversation with John Hollar
Turing's Cathedral. Author George Dyson in Conversation with John Hollar
Legendary historian George Dyson vividly re-creates the scenes of focused experimentation, incredible mathematical insight, and pure creative genius that gave us computers, digital television, modern genetics, models of stellar evolution—in other words, computer code.
Join John Hollar for a captivating conversation with Dyson about John von Neumann and the beginnings of the digital universe.
I am thinking about something much more important than bombs. I am thinking about computers.
John von Neumann, 1946


The most powerful technology of the last century was not the atomic bomb, but software—and both were invented by the same folks. Even as they were inventing it, the original geniuses imagined almost everything software has become since. At long last, George Dyson delivers the untold story of software’s creation. It is an amazing tale brilliantly deciphered.
Kevin Kelly,
cofounder of WIRED magazine, author of What Technology Wants


Legendary historian George Dyson vividly re-creates the scenes of focused experimentation, incredible mathematical insight, and pure creative genius that gave us computers, digital television, modern genetics, models of stellar evolution—in other words, computer code.


In the 1940s and '50s, a group of eccentric geniuses—led by John von Neumann—gathered at the newly created Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Their joint project was the realization of the theoretical universal machine, an idea that had been put forth by mathematician Alan Turing. This group of brilliant engineers worked in isolation, almost entirely independent from industry and the traditional academic community. But because they relied exclusively on government funding, the government wanted its share of the results: the computer that they built also led directly to the hydrogen bomb. George Dyson has uncovered a wealth of new material about this project, and in bringing the story of these men and women and their ideas to life, he shows how the crucial advancements that dominated twentieth-century technology emerged from one computer in one laboratory, where the digital universe as we know it was born.


Join John Hollar for a captivating conversation with Dyson about John von Neumann and the beginnings of the digital universe.

Send in your questions to George Dyson via Twitter using @computerhistory #TuringsCathedral.


We are pleased to partner with Kepler's on this event - they
will be selling copies of Turing's Cathedral before and after the event.


KQED Radio will be on-site to tape this event for broadcast March 8 at 8pm.

C-SPAN's Book TV will also be on-site to tape this event for future broadcast.

This event is part of our 2012 Revolutionaries series, featuring conversations with some of the most distinguished minds in the computing field.

Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
Everyone uses computers. Few know the story of how they came to be. Revolution chronicles the evolution and impact of modern computing from the abacus to the smart phone. This 25,000 sq. ft multimedia experience is a technological wonderland that immerses visitors in the sights, sounds, and stories of the computer revolution. Be sure to visit the Birth of the Computer gallery, where you can learn more about early computers and the people involved in creating them.
Visit Revolution online
Feb 24, 2012 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Woven on the Loom of Sorrow: The Co-Evolution of Computing and Conflict, presented by Grady Booch
Did you use the Internet today? Did you find your way using GPS? Have you used a credit card, or made a call on your mobile phone, or flown on an airplane? The very fabric of our lives, – from semiconductors to Silly Putty™, from work to play - has in many ways been shaped by war and woven on the loom of sorrow

The human needs for survival, protection, and dominance are powerful forces that have driven civilization for millenia. What does it say about us that we expend all this energy, concentration, money and emotion on fighting rather than talking?
A strange game. The only winning move is not to play.
Joshua from War Games

Did you use the Internet today? Did you find your way using GPS? Have you used a credit card, or made a call on your mobile phone, or flown on an airplane? The very fabric of our lives, – from semiconductors to Silly Putty™, from work to play - has in many ways been shaped by war and woven on the loom of sorrow

The human needs for survival, protection, and dominance are powerful forces that have driven civilization for millenia. What does it say about us that we expend all this energy, concentration, money and emotion on fighting rather than talking?
There is something fascinating – and telling – about the intersection of humanity and computing when it comes to fighting for survival. And, if we follow the consequences at the confluence of computing and conflict, what does it mean to have a war where no humans are present?

Computing: The Human Experience explores these startling stories at the intersection of computing and humanity, stories that are driven by human needs. From the abacus to the iPad, from Gutenberg to Google, from Enigma to GPS, we have created computers to count the uncountable, remember beyond our own experiences, and see the invisible as well as the unforeseeable. In just one or two generations – an imperceptible time in the timeless sweep of the universe – we have created a technology that has the power to extend us, to transform us, to define us, perhaps even to destroy us.

This is the world of computing, a world upon which we have come to depend. It is as if we have created a universe, then as its creators, made the choice to step inside and live within it. As such we are both its masters as well as its servants.

This event is the first in a series of lectures for Computing: The Human Experience, a transmedia project directed to the general public that explores the co-evolution of computing and humanity. Presented by IBM Fellow Grady Booch, Computing teaches the essential science of computing, presents the stories of the people, events, and inventions in the history of computing, examines the connection among computing, science, and society, and contemplates the future. Computing has played a fundamental role in the advancement of the human spirit, encompassing war, commerce, the arts, science, society, and faith and so this series takes us on a journey that examines the complex dance between computing and the human experience.

In this lecture, Grady explores the tangled web that connects both computing and conflict. How would computing have evolved without war as a clear and present force upon it? How will nations adjust to the ways in which computing has radically altered the very nature of warfare?

“Woven on the Loom of Sorrow” investigates this rich yet tragic connection between computing and conflict and considers the implications in the future of war.
Feb 16, 2012 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Beyond the Obvious: Killer Questions that Spark Game-Changing Innovation. Author Phil McKinney in conversation with CHM's John C. Hollar
Beyond the Obvious: Killer Questions that Spark Game-Changing Innovation
Join innovation expert Phil McKinney for a conversation with the Computer History Museum’s John Hollar about killer questions and some of the ways we can all learn to harness the power of innovation.
"Human beings are creatures of habit, so getting ourselves and our teams to think beyond the obvious is a challenge we face all the time. Phil McKinney is an innovation expert, and his killer questions and hit-the-spot anecdotes provide a great way to get out in front of opportunities we otherwise won't see."
--Geoffrey A. Moore,Author of Crossing the Chasm and Escape Velocity

Generating and executing great ideas is the key to staying ahead in a rapidly changing world. It seems so basic. Why is it so hard to actually get right? According to innovation expert Phil McKinney, the real problem is that we’re teaching people to ask the wrong questions about their businesses—or none at all. There has to be a better way.

In Beyond the Obvious, McKinney discusses his proven FIRE (Focus, Ideation, Rank, Execution) Method to dig deeper and get back to asking the right questions—the ones all companies must ask to survive. Full of real-world examples, this book will change the way you operate, innovate, and create, and it all begins with battle-tested questions Phil has gathered on note cards throughout his career. Shared for the first time here, these "Killer Questions" include:
• What are the rules and assumptions my industry operates under? What if the opposite were true?
• What will be the buying criteria used by my customer in 5 years?
• What are my unshakable beliefs about what my customers want?
• Who uses my product in ways I never anticipated?

Join innovation expert Phil McKinney for a conversation with the Computer History Museum's John Hollar about killer questions and some of the ways we can all learn to harness the power of innovation.

Our partner Kepler’s Books will be on-site selling copies of Beyond the Obvious before and after the event.
Jan 12, 2012 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
An Evening with Google's Marissa Mayer
This event kicks off our 2012 Revolutionaries series, featuring conversations with some of the most distinguished minds in the computing field. Join NPR Correspondent Laura Sydell for a wide-ranging conversation about the educational choices Marissa made, her early role models and mentors, and her continuing role as a mentor – to the next generation of computer scientists as well as women entrepreneurs like Tanzania's Susan Mashibe, TanJet Founder and Executive Director.
Marissa Mayer is the Vice President of Local, Maps, and Location Services at Google. She oversees product management, engineering, design and strategy for the company’s suite of local and geographical products, including Google Maps, Google Earth, Zagat, Street View, and local search, for desktop and mobile. She also curates the Google Doodle program, celebrating special events on Google's homepage around the world.

During her 12 years at Google, Marissa has held numerous positions, including engineer, designer, product manager, and executive, and has launched over 100 well-known features and products. Prior to her current role, she played an instrumental role in Google search, leading the product management efforts for more than 10 years, a period during which Google Search grew from a few hundred thousand to well over a billion searches per day. Marissa led the development of some of Google's most successful services including image, book and product search, toolbar, and iGoogle, and defined such pivotal products as Google News and Gmail. She is listed as an inventor on several patents in artificial intelligence and interface design.

Joining as the company's first female engineer in 1999, Marissa has played an important role in developing Google’s culture. Her contributions have included overseeing the look-and-feel of the company's iconic homepage and founding the Associate Product Manager program, which has hired over 300 of the company’s future leaders.

She graduated with honors from Stanford University with a BS in Symbolic Systems and a MS in Computer Science. For both degrees, she specialized in artificial intelligence. While at Stanford, she taught computer programming to more than 3000 students and received the Centennial Teaching and Forsythe Awards for her contributions to undergraduate education. In 2008, the Illinois Institute of Technology awarded her an honorary doctorate of engineering.

It has been quite a journey so far for Marissa, from her beginnings in Wisconsin, to the National Youth Science Camp, on to Stanford University and then landing at Google. Join NPR Correspondent Laura Sydell for a wide-ranging conversation about the educational choices Marissa made, her early role models and mentors, her work at Google, and her continuing role as a mentor – to the next generation of computer scientists as well as women entrepreneurs like Tanzania's Susan Mashibe, TanJet Founder and Executive Director.

We hope you will join us for an interesting and inspiring evening.

KQED Radio will be on-site to tape this event and will broadcast and live stream it on February 23, 2012 at 8pm.

This event kicks off our 2012 Revolutionaries series, featuring conversations with some of the most distinguished minds in the computing field.
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2011 Events

Dec 13, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Steve Jobs: The Authorized Biography. An Evening with Walter Isaacson
We are proud to welcome Isaacson for a conversation about Jobs' life, inspiration and legacy with Museum CEO John Hollar.
From the best-selling biographer of Albert Einstein and Benjamin Franklin comes the authorized story of Steve Jobs, one of the most celebrated global business figures in history. Award-winning author and journalist Walter Isaacson enjoyed unprecedented access to Jobs and conducted more than 40 personal interviews with him over two years. In addition, he talked to more than a hundred family members, friends, adversaries, competitors, and colleagues. The result is a riveting story of the roller-coaster life and intense personality of a creator, entrepreneur and executive whose fierce drive and passion for perfection revolutionized personal computers, animated movies, music, mobile phones, tablet computing digital publishing and "apps."


We are proud to welcome Isaacson for a conversation about Jobs' life, inspiration and legacy with Museum CEO John Hollar.


Our partner Kepler’s Books will be on-site selling copies of the book and will assist with the author book signing immediately following the program’s conclusion. If you would like to purchase a copy of the book before the event, visit Kepler’s website.


KQED Radio will be on-site taping this event and will broadcast and live stream it on December 14 at 8pm. C-SPAN's Book TV will also be on-site taping this event for future broadcast.
Nov 15, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
A Computer Called Watson: IBM Research's David Ferrucci in Conversation with the Financial Times' Richard Waters
A Computer Called Watson: IBM Research's David Ferrucci in Conversation with the Financial Times' Richard Waters
This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
In an historic event in February 2011, IBM’s Watson computer competed on Jeopardy! against the TV quiz show’s two biggest all-time champions. Watson is a computer running software called Deep QA, developed by IBM Research. While the grand challenge driving the project was to win on Jeopardy!, the broader goal of Watson was to create a new generation of technology that can find answers in unstructured data more effectively than standard search technology.


Computer systems that can directly and accurately answer peoples' questions over a broad domain of human knowledge have been envisioned by scientists and writers since the advent of computers themselves. Open domain question answering holds tremendous promise for facilitating informed decision making over vast volumes of natural language content. Applications in business intelligence, healthcare, customer support, enterprise knowledge management, social computing, science and government could all benefit from computer systems capable of deeper language understanding. The DeepQA project is aimed at exploring how advancing and integrating Natural Language Processing (NLP), Information Retrieval (IR), Machine Learning (ML), Knowledge Representation and Reasoning (KR&R) and massively parallel computation can greatly advance the science and application of automatic Question Answering.


Dr. Ferrucci is an IBM Fellow and Watson Principal Investigator for IBM Research. Richard Waters is the West Coast Editor for the Financial Times. Join them for a fascinating exploration of how the Watson project began, its ancestry, the epic Jeopardy! win, and the ways Watson technology can improve human decision-making.


And, after the conversation has ended, let the games begin! We will play host to another round of Jeopardy! – featuring another pair of humans brave enough to take on Watson. They are Ms. Stacey Higginbotham and Dr. Robert Walker. IBM Research's Dr. Eric Brown will be the game's host. Please join us!


This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
Nov 8, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
The Technology of Animation
The Computer History Museum is proud to announce that DreamWorks Animation Jeffrey Katzenberg and Ed Leonard will kick off this series, in a conversation moderated by HP's Phil McKinney. Over the course of the evening they will discuss the history, techniques, challenges and future possibilities of digital animation. You will receive a behind-the-scenes look at Silicon Valley's contributions to creativity with today's leading digital moguls.
The first in a series of conversations with leading entertainment companies on the impact of technology on their businesses.


"Many of the tools that we use are things that we author ourselves. But we have two of the largest, and clearly two of the finest, high-tech companies in the world as creative and business partners of ours: Hewlett-Packard and Intel. Both of these companies keep us on the cutting edge. And they see us as a great almost test base, you know, a lighthouse, to put their best products through their paces, and to find out where the boundaries are. I consider them kind of our godparents."


Jeffrey Katzenberg
CEO, DreamWorks
Forbes, March 1, 2010



Computers were born and bred for war, hard science and business. Now they are telling stories. Computer technology drives movies and television today. It sweeps us into worlds built from 1s and 0s that seem more true-to-life than real life. We have explored Middle Earth and deep space. We have met animated characters as vivid as vital as any best actor performance.

The arrival of computers, like so many breakthroughs, was met with derision. Three-D was for cheap monster flicks. Digital movies would look like video games. They would never replace 35 mm film or match the subtlety of actors in the flesh.

It all happened so fast that the future of entertainment arrived even before the industry tried to predict it. Jeffery Katzenberg was one of the few who saw the potential: "It seemed like an all or nothing bet. This is our future."


Today, computers are freeing the industry to make movies out of stories that could otherwise never be filmed. And the future will challenge the barrier between fantasy and reality. Will we someday be able to step through the screen and into the story?


The Computer History Museum is proud to announce that DreamWorks Animation’s Jeffrey Katzenberg and Ed Leonard will kick off this series, in a conversation moderated by HP’s Phil McKinney. Over the course of the evening they’ll discuss the history, techniques, challenges and future possibilities of digital animation. You’ll receive a behind-the-scenes look at Silicon Valley’s contributions to creativity with today’s leading digital moguls.
Nov 5, 2011 2:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
The Challenge and Promise of Artificial Intelligence, a Bay Area Science Festival Wonder Dialog
The Challenge and Promise of Artificial Intelligence
Join leading researchers Dr. Eric Horvitz of Microsoft Research and Dr. Peter Norvig of Google for an intriguing discussion about the past, present, and future of artificial intelligence, moderated by KQED's Tim Olson.
Join leading researchers Dr. Eric Horvitz of Microsoft Research and Dr. Peter Norvig of Google for an intriguing discussion about the past, present, and future of artificial intelligence, moderated by KQED's Tim Olson. We are extremely fortunate to have Eric and Peter on our stage – they've known each other for several years, and can discuss everything from machine learning to data-driven science, the world of perception, speech recognition, robotics, self-driving cars, and even a computer called Watson. A Wonder Dialog indeed!

Make sure you leave time before or after this event to visit the Museum's new exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing. Among Revolutions 19 galleries, you will find one devoted to the history of Artificial Intelligence & Robotics, with its featured icon, Shakey the Robot.

We are proud to partner with the Bay Area Science Festival on this Wonder Dialog. This event is also part of the Museum’s Revolutionaries 2011 lecture series, featuring conversations with some of the most distinguished thinkers in the technology industry. We are very pleased that KQED Radio will tape this event, and will broadcast and live stream it on Wednesday, November 30 at 8p.m.
Oct 25, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Worm: The First Digital World War. Author Mark Bowden and Microsoft's T.J. Campana in Conversation with John Markoff of The New York Times
Worm: The First Digital World War
We are very pleased to welcome John Markoff of The New York Times back to our stage to moderate a conversation about the Conficker worm and the wages of this digital war, with author Bowden and T. J. Camapana, Senior Program Manager for Microsoft's Digital Crimes Unit. Campana is responsible for investigating cybercrime issues related to malware, botnets, hacking and other criminal and security incidents involving a Microsoft technologies, properties and services.
"A new digital plague has hit the Internet, infecting millions of personal and business computers in what seems to be the first step of a multistage attack. The world's leading computer security experts do not yet know who programmed the infection, or what the next stage will be."
John Markoff, The New York Times January 22, 2009


When the Conficker computer worm was unleashed on the world in November 2008, cybersecurity experts did not know what to make of it. The worm, exploiting the security flaws in Microsoft Windows, grew at an astonishingly rapid rate, infecting millions of computers around the world within weeks. Once the worm infiltrated one system it was able to link that system with others to form a single network under illicit outside control - a situation known as a "botnet." This botnet was soon capable of overpowering any of the vital computer networks that today control banking, telephone service, energy flow, air traffic, health-care information - even the Internet itself. Was it a platform for criminal profit, or a weapon? Security experts do not know for sure what Conficker's purpose is, or even where it came from.


Mark Bowden's "Worm: The First Digital World War," is about the next frontier in terrorism. Bowden, the best-selling author of Black Hawk Down, has delivered a dramatic cybercrime story that explores the Conficker computer worm, a potentially devastating computer virus that has baffled experts and infected as many as twelve million computers to date.


We are very pleased to welcome John Markoff of The New York Times back to our stage to moderate a conversation about the Conficker worm and the wages of this digital war, with author Bowden and T. J. Camapana, Senior Program Manager for Microsoft's Digital Crimes Unit. Campana is responsible for investigating cybercrime issues related to malware, botnets, hacking and other criminal and security incidents involving Microsoft technologies, properties and services.
We are very pleased that KQED Radio will tape this event, and will broadcast and live stream it on October 27 at 8pm and on Saturday, November 12 at 1pm.
Oct 15, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Analog Life: Remembering Jim Williams
Join us for this special night and learn about the importance and impact of analog circuits on current technology and be inspired by the life and work of Jim Williams.
The world around us is a symphony of vibrations. From temperature, light, sound and a host of other physical quantities, we live in a world of continuously varying signals. Capturing these signals and making them do amazing things is the domain of the analog circuit designer.

Join us for a special night on October 15 as we feature a panel discussion on the world of analog systems and one of its biggest stars, Jim Williams.

Williams was a remarkable man: an engineer who was self-taught yet set the bar for the entire technical community. Artist, scientist, mentor and teacher, come celebrate and reflect upon this man’s influence and on the world of analog systems around us with five distinguished guests:

- Co-founder and CTO of Linear Technology , Bob Dobkin,
- Founder and CTO, Bam Labs Inc, Steve Young,
- Vice President, Power Management Products, Linear Technology, Steve Pietkiewicz,
- Professor, Stanford University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Greg Kovacs.
- Museum President & CEO, John Hollar will moderate the conversation.

On the same day, the Museum also opens its new exhibit: “An Analog Life: Remembering Jim Williams,” featuring Jim Williams’s famous analog workbench. We hope you can join us Oct 15 to see the exhibit and attend the panel.
Sep 21, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
Venture Capital in the Valley: Past, Present & Future
Venture Capital in the Valley: Past, Present & Future
This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum's permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
After our July screening of SOMETHING VENTURED, which chronicles the founding of the venture capital industry in Silicon Valley, we are convening a panel to discuss the VC model of today and tomorrow. Does venture investing need to evolve to keep fueling innovation in the Valley and around the world? What are the implications of the latest round of huge U.S. IPOs of social media and internet companies? Is history repeating itself with another bubble forming, or is this the new reality of a connected globe with multiple billions of potential users?

Our panel will feature two generations of venture investors giving their views on these and other questions: Chairman and Co-founder of New Enterprise Associates (NEA), VC legend Dick Kramlich, and Accel Partners next generation VC leader, Theresia Gouw Ranzetta. Richard Waters, San Francisco Bureau Chief for the Financial Times, will moderate the conversation.

We are proud to be co-hosting this event with the National Venture Capital Association (NVCA). The NVCA empowers its members and the entrepreneurs they fund by advocating for policies that encourage innovation and reward long-term investment. As the venture community's preeminent trade association, NVCA serves as the definitive resource for venture capital data and unites its 400 plus members through a full range of professional services. You can learn more about the NVCA at www.nvca.org.
Aug 24, 2011 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Software Patent Debate
Proponents of software patents argue that software deserves the protection of patents just as any other invention does. Critics of software patents argue that they stifle innovation rather than promote it by cutting off the free flow of ideas needed to advance technology.
Proponents of software patents argue that software deserves the protection of patents just as any other invention does. Critics of software patents argue that they stifle innovation rather than promote it by cutting off the free flow of ideas needed to advance technology.

THE MOTION: SOFTWARE PATENTS ENCOURAGE INNOVATION
Proponents of software patents argue that software deserves the protection of patents just as any other invention does. Software is simply a description of computer instructions that allow a processor to perform complex tasks. Particularly in today's knowledge economy, the value of software is growing and patents protect the investment of time, effort, and money made by companies and individual programmers.

Critics of software patents argue that they stifle innovation rather than promote it by cutting off the free flow of ideas needed to advance technology. Software consists of mathematical equations, which cannot and should not be patentable. Most software patents describe algorithms that are simple or obvious to a programmer of ordinary skill and thus do not deserve patent protection.



FOR THE MOTION
Bob Zeidman is the president and founder of Zeidman Consulting, a premiere contract research and development firm in Silicon Valley that focuses on engineering consulting to law firms about intellectual property disputes. Clients have included Apple Computer, Cisco Systems, Cadence Design Systems, Facebook, Intel, Symantec, Texas Instruments, and Zynga. Bob is also the president and founder of Software Analysis and Forensic Engineering Corporation, the leading provider of software intellectual property analysis tools. Bob has worked on and testified in nearly 100 cases involving billions of dollars in disputed intellectual property.


Bob is a prolific writer and instructor, giving seminars at conferences around the world. Among his publications are numerous articles on engineering and business as well as four textbooks, two novels, and three screenplays. Bob holds numerous patents and earned two bachelor's degrees, in physics and electrical engineering, from Cornell University and a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University.



AGAINST THE MOTION
Edward A. Lee has been on the faculty in the Electrical Engineering
and Computer Sciences (EECS) department at U.C. Berkeley for more than 25 years. He has served as chair of the department and currently holds the Robert S. Pepper Distinguished Professorship. He has been a proponent of open source software and has headed the design and development of an open source design environment known as Ptolemy. He is a co-founder of BDTI, Inc., a technical analysis and advising company, where he is currently a Senior Technical Ad visor, has consulted for a number of other companies, and has served as an expert witness and/or advisor in software patent litigation cases. His research interests center on design, modeling, and analysis of embedded, real-time computational systems. He is a director of Chess, the Berkeley Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems. He has published extensively, including six books and hundreds of research papers. Prior to Berkeley, Prof. Lee was a member of technical staff at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Holmdel, New Jersey, in the Advanced Data Communications Laboratory. His bachelors degree (B.S.) is from Yale University (1979), his masters (S.M.) from MIT (1981), and his Ph.D. from U. C. Berkeley (1986). He is a Fellow of the IEEE, was an NSF Presidential Young Investigator, and won the 1997 Frederick Emmons Terman Award for Engineering Education.



MODERATOR
John C. Hollar, President and Chief Executive Officer, Computer History Museum. He has served as CEO since 2008, and holds bachelor's degrees in political science and journalism (BFA), and in law (JD) from Harvard Law School.



AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION
The audience will serve as jurors. NOTE
Bob Zeidman will be signing copies of his most recent book, The Software IP Detective Handbook, after today's debate. The book will be made available for purchase in the Museum store.
Jul 27, 2011 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
MIPS: Risking It All on RISC
Stanford University President John Hennessy and MIPS colleagues Bob Miller, Skip Stritter and Joe DiNucci will discuss the story of MIPS, a groundbreaking company in the computer industry.

In 1981, Hennessy led the Stanford research team that developed a Reduced Instruction Set Computing (RISC) microprocessor that had the potential to dramatically increase performance and reduce costs.

Then in 1984, Hennessy joined Skip Stritter and John Mousourris to...
Stanford University President John Hennessy and MIPS colleagues Bob Miller, Skip Stritter and Joe DiNucci will discuss the story of MIPS, a groundbreaking company in the computer industry.

In 1981, Hennessy led the Stanford research team that developed a Reduced Instruction Set Computing (RISC) microprocessor that had the potential to dramatically increase performance and reduce costs.

Then in 1984, Hennessy joined Skip Stritter and John Mousourris to co-found MIPS Computer Systems to take on the daunting task of bringing a RISC microprocessor to market. Today called MIPS Technologies, it was the world's first commercial RISC chip company and one of the first semiconductor companies who rely on partners to fabricate their chips. The final radical touch: MIPS was a UNIX-based microprocessor, deeply influenced by the needs of the operating system and compilers. Hennessy and team were not just taking on huge hardware and software challenges; they were also taking on Intel, which by then had the dominant market position with its flagship processor family.

MIPS became one of the primary enablers of the explosive growth of the workstation market in the late 1980s. Silicon Graphics used powerful MIPS processors in its graphic servers and workstations. Moviegoers saw the results in a new generation of visually stunning blockbusters, including Star Wars, Jurassic Park and Toy Story. Today, MIPS processors are found in networking, telecommunications, video arcade games, video game consoles, computer printers, DSL and cable modems and digital TV and PDA applications.

Join us for a panel discussion on the rise of one of the great business and technology stories of computer history. The minds behind MIPS gather to discuss the creation and marketing of MIPS and its impact on the semiconductor and computing industries.

The program moderator, Dave House, spent 22 years at Intel, 13 of them as general manager of the microprocessor division against which the MIPS team competed. It should be a lively discussion.
Jul 14, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries
SOMETHING VENTURED
About the Film. SOMETHING VENTURED tells the story of the creation of an industry that went on to become the single greatest engine of innovation and economic growth in the 20th century. It is told by the visionary risk-takers who dared to make it happen...Tom Perkins, Don Valentine, Arthur Rock, Dick Kramlich and others. The film also includes some of our finest entrepreneurs sharing how they worked with these venture capitalists to grow world-class...
About the Film. SOMETHING VENTURED tells the story of the creation of an industry that went on to become the single greatest engine of innovation and economic growth in the 20th century. It is told by the visionary risk-takers who dared to make it happen...Tom Perkins, Don Valentine, Arthur Rock, Dick Kramlich and others. The film also includes some of our finest entrepreneurs sharing how they worked with these venture capitalists to grow world-class companies like Intel, Apple, Cisco, Atari, Genentech, Tandem and others.

Beginning in the late 1950's, this small group of high rollers fostered a one-of-a-kind business culture that encouraged extraordinary risk and made possible unprecedented rewards. They laid the groundwork for America's start-up economy, providing not just the working capital but the guidance to allow seedling companies to reach their full potential. Our lives would be dramatically different without the contributions that these venture capitalists made to the creation of PCs, the Internet and life-saving drugs.

Directed by Emmy-Award-winning filmmakers Dan Geller and Dayna Goldfine, SOMETHING VENTURED is executive produced by Paul Holland, a general partner with Foundation Capital, and Molly Davis, a founding partner of Rainmaker Communications.

SOMETHING VENTURED will also screen during the Palo Alto Film Festival, September 29 through October 2, 2011. PAIFF: Redefining Film in a Digital Age. PAIFF is a four-day festival celebrating the new forms of storytelling in film and media that have developed as a result of technological innovation. The inaugural festival showcases 20 features, 25 shorts and 30 talks, panels and workshops.

This screening is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum's permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
Jun 29, 2011 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
The History of Magnetic Striped Media Technology - A Lecture by Jerome Svigals
Magnetic striped media are used by more than 80% of the world's population. They are swiped through slot readers more than 50 billion times a year. They are used for financial transactions, automatic teller machines, mass transit access, identification and access control devices. Their information content is specified by national and international standards.
Magnetic striped media are used by more than 80% of the world’s population. They are swiped through slot readers more than 50 billion times a year. They are used for financial transactions, in automatic teller machines, mass transit access, identification and access control devices and their information content is specified by national and international standards.

Magnetic striped media design is surviving through subsequent technologies. Smart Cards with embedded chips in their media are still striped for transition and backup and the mobile phone when used as a payment device emits the same data stream as recorded on standard striped media.

The “simple” magnetic striped media was the combination of solutions to four different technical challenges. The first was mastering the how to apply magnetics to the surfaces of plastic cards or paper tickets. The second challenge was the specification of recordings which allow multiple industry use; the third challenge was the design of the accepting units to allow successful use of the media by the world’s population. The fourth challenge was design of the security system to control the use of an easily-read and recorded media.

Originally, the IBM development group for magnetic striped media faced rejection by engineering and marketing staffs. Engineering opposed the apparent lack of security. Marketing opposed a solution which was competitive with an alternative technology proposed by a major IBM customer.

This lecture will recount these events, the key players/organizations, and the answer to how magnetic media has become a technology used worldwide in such a wide variety of applications. Mr. Svigals is a former IBM executive and was the IBM development manager for magnetic media during the formative period of 1968 to 1973. He has since written 26 books on cards and payments. Svigals will conclude his talk with a brief projection of the media based industry through 2020.
May 11, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Sir Maurice Wilkes: The Man and His Machine
This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
Sir Maurice Wilkes, without doubt one of the foremost pioneers of computing, died in November last year aged 97. In a remarkably long and distinguished career, he built the EDSAC the world's first electronic stored-program computer to go into regular service, and went on to pioneer concepts such a microprogramming, bit-sliced architectures, local area networks and many many other things. He served the international computing community with distinction and gained many honours.

David Hartley has spent almost the whole of his career in Cambridge University much of it in close association with Sir Maurice. In conversation with CHM’s John Hollar, David will describe Sir Maurice's more important achievements, including the EDSAC computer, as well as giving a personal view of a man that he knew and with whom he worked over such a long period of time.


This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
May 11, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Computer Conservation in the United Kingdom: The EDSAC Replica Project
The Computer History Museum is very pleased to welcome Kevin Murrell to our stage for a lecture about computer conservation in the United Kingdom. Mr. Murrell will provide an overview of the British Computer Society’s Computer Conservation Society (CCS) and its restoration projects, including the EDSAC replica project, and the restoration of the Harwell Dekatron computer. The CCS has a twenty year track record in successfully recreating pioneering computers.
Recreating a fully functioning EDSAC computer is quite a challenge, but our experience in rebuilding the Colossus computer gives us confidence and insight. - Kevin Murrell, Director and Trustee The National Museum of Computing

The Computer History Museum is very pleased to welcome Kevin Murrell to our stage for a lecture about computer conservation in the United Kingdom. Mr. Murrell will provide an overview of the British Computer Society’s Computer Conservation Society (CCS) and its restoration projects, including the EDSAC replica project, and the restoration of the Harwell Dekatron computer. The CCS has a twenty year track record in successfully recreating pioneering computers.

Mr. Murrell’s visit coincides with that of Dr. David Hartley, who will visit our stage later in the evening to pay tribute to Sir Maurice Wilkes and his many achievements, among them the design and creation of the EDSAC.

The Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator (EDSAC) was a general purpose research tool at Cambridge University and also led directly to the first business computer. It is planned to recreate EDSAC in full public view at The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park. The project, which is expected to take three to
four years, is being funded by a consortium led by computing entrepreneur, Hermann Hauser.


EDSAC Facts
• EDSAC was based on the ideas of John von Neumann and others who in 1945 suggested that the future of computing lay in computers which could store sets of instructions (programs) as well as data.
• EDSAC was over two metres high and occupied a ground area of four metres by five metres.
• Its 3000+ vacuum tubes used as logic were arranged on 12 racks.
• Mercury-filled tubes acted as memory
• It performed 650 instructions per second.
• EDSAC ran its first program on 6 May 1949 and soon began nine years of regular service ending in July 1958 when it was dismantled to enable the re-use of precious space. By then it had been superseded by the faster,
more reliable and much larger EDSAC 2.



Professor Andrew Hopper, Head of the Computer Laboratory at Cambridge University, said: EDSAC set computing standards for academia and commerce. It was so successful that in the nine years following 1949 it was used by Cambridge University researchers in studies such as genetics, meteorology and X-ray crystallography and even helped two researchers win Nobel prizes. EDSAC also led directly to the first
commercially applied computer, the LEO, that broke new ground by enabling the catering company J Lyons & Co Ltd to perform payroll calculations in 1953.

The recreation will be as authentic as possible and true to the spirit and technology of the time. Occupying a floor area of 20 square metres, the replica EDSAC is planned to be a highly visible display. The original had over 3000 electronic tubes (or valves) used for logic, mercury-filled tubes for memory, data input via paper tape and output on a teleprinter. Only the mercury-filled tubes are expected not to be recreated – in compliance with modern safety requirements – and will be substituted with a similar delay line storage technology. Len Shustek, the Chairman of CHM’s Board of Trustees, will join Kevin on stage for the Q&A portion of this event.
Apr 25, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Idea Man: Author Paul Allen in Conversation with Jose Antonio Vargas
This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
In 2007 and 2008, Time named Paul Allen one of the hundred most influential people in the world. His impact has been felt in science, technology, business, medicine, sports, music, and philanthropy. His passion, curiosity, and intellectual rigor - combined with the resources to launch and support new initiatives - have literally changed the world.

In 2009 Allen discovered that he had lymphoma, lending urgency to his desire to share his story for the first time. In this long-awaited memoir, Allen explains how he has solved problems, what he's learned from his many endeavors--both the triumphs and the failures--and his compelling vision for the future. He reflects candidly on an extraordinary life. The book also features previously untold stories about everything from the true origins of Microsoft to Allen's role in the dawn of private space travel (with SpaceShipOne) and in discoveries at the frontiers of brain science.

Paul Allen co-founded Microsoft with Bill Gates. He is the chairman of Vulcan Inc. and founder of the Allen Institute for Brain Science. He also owns the Seattle Seahawks and the Portland Trail Blazers and is co-owner of the Seattle Sounders pro soccer team.

Join us for a fascinating glimpse into Paul Allen’s life and work, with the award-winning multimedia journalist, Jose Antonio Vargas.

This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing. This event is brought to you by Kepler’s and the Computer History Museum.
Apr 6, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaires
In The Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives. Author Steven Levy in Conversation with NPR’s Laura Sydell
This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
Few companies in history have ever been as successful and admired as Google, the startup that has transformed the Internet and become an indispensable part of our lives. How has Google done it? Veteran technology reporter Steven Levy was granted unprecedented access to the company, and in this revelatory book he takes readers inside Google headquarters – the Googleplex – to show how Google works.

The Computer History Museum is pleased to be the first stop on Levy’s book tour, and to have Levy and Sydell – who have both been reporting on Google for over a decade – on our stage to examine Google from the inside out. Their conversation will be wide ranging -- including a look at Google’s many successful businesses -- due in large part according to Levy to its engineering mindset, and adoption of Internet values like speed, openness, experimentation and risk-taking. They will also discuss whether Google has lost its innovative edge, its stumble in China, its newest initiative in social networking where it’s chasing a successful competitor for the first time…and much more.

This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing. Keplers Books will be on location to sell copies of In The Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives.
Mar 9, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaires
Author Jane McGonigal in Conversation with NPR’s Laura Sydell. Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World
We’re going to see games tackling women’s rights. We’re going to see games around climate change. We’re going to see games around medical innovation that doctors are going to play.- Jane McGonigal
We’re going to see games tackling women’s rights. We’re going to see games around climate change. We’re going to see games around medical innovation that doctors are going to play.- Jane McGonigal


In 1988, when Jane McGonigal was 10, she started gaming for fun on a Commodore 64 computer. Twenty-two years and one Berkeley Ph.D later, she still thinks games are fun. But as director of game research and development at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, she also thinks they can save the world. In fact, her first book, Reality is Broken, predicts a game designer will win the Nobel Peace Prize. (From O Magazine’s 2010 Power List)

Why, McGonigal asks, should we use the power of games for escapist entertainment alone? Her research suggests that gamers are expert problem solvers and collaborators, because they cooperate with other players to overcome daunting virtual challenges, and she helped pioneer a fast-growing genre of games that aim to turn gameplay to socially positive ends.

In Reality is Broken, she reveals how these new Alternate Reality Games are already improving the quality of our daily lives, fighting social problems like depression and obesity and addressing vital twenty-first century challenges – and she forecasts the thrilling possibilities that lie ahead. She introduces us to games like World Without Oil, a simulation designed to brainstorm – and therefore avert – the challenges of a worldwide oil shortage, and Evoke, a game commissioned by the World Bank Institute that sends players on missions to address issues from poverty to climate change.

Join NPR’s Laura Sydell for what is certain to be a fascinating and provocative conversation with visionary Jane McGonigal. They’ll discuss the ways in which we might harness the power of games to solve real world problems and boost global happiness. Revolutionary thinking for certain!

This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition: Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing. Keplers Books will be on location to sell copies of Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World.
Mar 6, 2011 4:00 PM Cinema Series
CHM Film Showing
Top Secret Rosies: The Female Computers of World War II
In 1942, when computers were human and women were underestimated, a group of female mathematicians helped win a war and usher in the modern computer age. Sixty-five years later their story has finally been told.
In 1942, when computers were human and women were underestimated, a group of female mathematicians helped win a war and usher in the modern computer age. Sixty-five years later their story has finally been told.

The Computer History Museum welcomes filmmaker LeAnn Erickson during her year long screening tour of the documentary Top Secret Rosies: The Female Computers of WWII. Ms. Erickson will screen the film and conduct a Question/Answer session to follow.

This one hour documentary shares the little known story of a group of female mathematicians who did secret ballistics research for the US Army during WWII, a handful of whom went on to serve as the programmers of ENIAC, the first electronic computer. Jean Jennings Bartik, a Computer History Museum Fellow, appears in the film, along with other female 'human computers' and two veterans who used their ballistics work. Free to Attend
Feb 23, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
40th Anniversary of SPICE
Please Join us for the 40th Anniversary Celebration of the SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis), circuit simulator. You will get to witness a roundtable discussion of those responsible for the creation and world-wide propagation of this invaluable and universally used software program. Topics will include the origins, evolution, and future of SPICE, and its seminal role as early open-source software.
Please Join us for the 40th Anniversary Celebration of the SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis), circuit simulator. SPICE was born as a class project at UC Berkeley and first released in 1971. You will get to witness a roundtable discussion of those responsible for the creation and world-wide propagation of this invaluable and universally used software program. Topics will include the origins, evolution, and future of SPICE, and its seminal role as early open-source software. For ISSCC Attendees 4:30 p.m. Coach Service will depart from San Francisco Marriott (Optional)*- Fee $20
Deadline to sign up for the Coach Service is February 16th.
Feb 10, 2011 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes Revolutionaries
William H. Draper III, Author of The Startup Game: Inside the Partnership Between Venture Capitalists and Entrepreneurs, in Conversation with KQED’s Dave Iverson
This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
When we think of Silicon Valley today, innovative companies such as Google, Facebook, Open Table, and others will come to mind for just about every American. It’s difficult to imagine these powerhouses as small, struggling start-ups, but at some point, each one was just a good idea that needed support, and for these and countless others, that support came through venture capitalists. Venture capital is much more than the caricature many may think of when they hear the term; these businessmen and women do not invest millions with the sole hope of “cashing out” in the future. In fact, they provide creative thinkers with both the capital necessary to turn their vision into a reality, as well as the business know-how and networking skills necessary to keep the company afloat.

The Startup Game covers Bill Draper’s forty years of experience and describes how vital the relationship between venture capitalist and entrepreneur is to the future of business, and offers lessons culled from decades of working in the technology center of the world. Draper extracts lessons and advice that only a lifetime in the field can provide—from the necessary qualities any successful entrepreneur must possess to the importance of friendship and family in the business world. He provides candid descriptions of his own successes and failures in venture capital and public service, and writes passionately about the important role government can—and in his view should—play in encouraging new businesses in the United States.

The Museum is very proud to welcome the team of Draper and Iverson to our stage. Dave Iverson is a master interviewer and will conduct a fascinating conversation with one of our country’s leading venture capitalists.

This event is part of our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum’s permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing. Kepler’s Books will be on-site selling copies of The Startup Game, and there will be a book signing following the program.
Jan 27, 2011 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Jane Smiley, Author of The Man Who Invented the Computer: The Biography of John Atanasoff, Digital Pioneer, in Conversation with CHM's John C. Hollar
This event is the first in our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum's permanent exhibition: Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
One night in the late 1930s, in a bar on the Illinois-Iowa border, John Vincent Atanasoff, a professor of physics at Iowa State University, after a frustrating day performing tedious mathematical calculations in his lab, hit on the idea that the binary number system and electronic switches, combined with an array of capacitors on a moving drum to serve as memory, could yield a computing machine that would make his life and the lives of other similarly burdened scientists easier. Then he went back and built the machine. It worked. The whole world changed.

Why don't we know the name of John Atanasoff as well as we know those of Alan Turing and John von Neumann? Atanasoff never secured a patent for his early device, and a number of the concepts he pioneered were incorporated into the breakthrough ENIAC computer that evolved into the legendary UNIVAC. But in 1973 a court declared that the patent on that Sperry Rand device was invalid, opening the intellectual property gates to the computer revolution.

Join Pulitzer Prize winning novelist Jane Smiley in a conversation with the Computer History Museum's John Hollar about the fascinating man who beat the world's greatest minds in the quest to develop the first true digital computing machine.

This event is the first in our 2011 lecture series celebrating Revolutionaries, featuring conversations with and about some of the most distinguished thinkers in the computing field. The Revolutionaries lecture series complements the launch of the Computer History Museum's permanent exhibition: Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing. Gordon Bell will introduce the program, which will feature selected footage from John Atanasoff's 1980 appearance at the Computer Museum in Boston.

Kepler's Books will be on location selling copies of The Man Who Invented the Computer.
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2010 Events

Aug 19, 2010 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Net@40: Not Your Father’s Internet: Redefining Digital Culture. Intel’s Dr. Genevieve Bell and UC Berkeley’s Dr. Abigail De Kosnik in Conversation with NPR’s Laura Sydell
In 1998 Americans represented nearly three quarters of all Internet users; today they are less than fifteen percent. The complexion of the Web - its users, their desires, their languages, points of entry and experiences - has subtly and not-so-subtly changed. All these new online participants bring with them different values, social norms, and styles of expression. Today's Internet is increasingly a reflection of the world's cultures and its governments, which often have very different ideas about how to shape what happens online.
Not Your Father's Internet

In 1998 Americans represented nearly three quarters of all Internet users; today they are less than fifteen percent. The complexion of the Web - its users, their desires, their languages, points of entry and experiences - has subtly and not-so-subtly changed. All these new online participants bring with them different values, social norms, and styles of expression. Today's Internet is increasingly a reflection of the world's cultures and its governments, which often have very different ideas about how to shape what happens online.

Join NPR's Digital Culture Correspondent Laura Sydell, and her guests for an engaging discussion about the changing face of the Internet. The many pioneers who built our networked world had a great variety of visions-- and hopes-- for how it might turn out. But nobody could predict all the ways this new mass medium has evolved in the real world of billions of users. Today the Internet may be like a large city with rich and poor neighborhoods, dangerous corners, and gated communities that Netizens must navigate at their own risk.

We'll examine this evolution from a global perspective: What is the Internet becoming? Has its open architecture become so frightening to some users that they would prefer to return to closed networks? How will varying ideas about privacy, identity, anonymity and democracy shape the Internet of the future? Is the free and open Internet our fathers fought to build over the objections of commercial giants, soon to be shaped more by corporations and governments than by individual creativity and the free flow of ideas? The Net@40 Program is in partnership with NPR.
Jul 21, 2010 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Net@40: The Facebook Effect, Author David Kirkpatrick, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, in Conversation with NPR’s Guy Raz
As part of its Net@40 series, the Computer History Museum is proud to present an evening of fascinating dialogue between Kirkpatrick and Zuckerberg on the past and future of Facebook. The moderator will be Guy Raz, the Peabody award-winning host of NPR’s All Things Considered.
The growth and impact of Facebook is mind blowing, even for an industry that considers “overnight success” to be a long-range goal. Founded in a Harvard dorm room on February 4th 2004 by 19-year-old Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook now has almost 500 million active users. Most are outside of the United States. Half of them log on every day.

Facebook has already made an irreversible impact on society, marketing and politics – even driving protest around the world including in countries such as Colombia and Iran. Facebook is also changing our sense of identity: “I am on Facebook; therefore I am.”

Longtime Fortune technology writer David Kirkpatrick chronicles the rise of Facebook in one of the most anticipated books of 2010: The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting The World. Kirkpatrick gained the full cooperation of Zuckerberg and his team. The Facebook Effect is the first historically authoritative account of how a simple idea became the dominant way to communicate on the Internet.

As part of its Net@40 series, the Computer History Museum is proud to present an evening of fascinating dialogue between Kirkpatrick and Zuckerberg on the past and future of Facebook. The moderator will be Guy Raz, the Peabody award-winning host of NPR’s All Things Considered. The Net@40 Program is in partnership with National Public Radio.
Jul 15, 2010 6:00 PM Speaker Series
The CHM Affiliated History Program Presents
Before Bangalore and Silicon Valley: How Indian MIT and IIT Graduates Have Shaped Computing History
CHM’s July 15 “In Conversation With” program will feature Dr. Bassett and T.M. Ravi an IIT graduate, Silicon Valley businessman, and member of TIE discussing the roots of the Indian IT industry and its influence on the computing history.
In the last fifteen years the very names Bangalore and Silicon Valley have become evocative of the important connections between India and the United States in the global IT industry. Historian Ross Bassett argues that the linkages between the two countries are far older and deeper than is widely known. In the course of his research, he found that Indian graduates of MIT, to a remarkable extent, significantly influenced the creation of modern technological India. In the colonial period, a small group of Indians, including some associated with Gandhi, went to MIT as an anti-colonial act and as a way to develop technological capabilities for India. Indian graduates of MIT played a key role in the founding of the Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT), and in the years after 1947, were central figures in the Indian steel industry, the atomic program, and the space program. The Indian IT industry today is to an astounding degree the product of Indian graduates of MIT. Since 1965, Indian graduates of MIT and graduates of MIT once removed---that is graduates of the IITs---have also played an increasingly important role in American technology and computing.

Bassett’s research is based on numerous research trips to India and scores of interviews. For this project he created a database of every Indian graduate of MIT in the 20th century. Bassett has published articles on Indian graduates of MIT and on IIT Kanpur. His work was profiled in the Economic Times of India and he was invited to give to Godrej Lecture in Business History in Mumbai in October, 2009.

CHM’s July 15 “In Conversation With” program will feature Dr. Bassett and T.M. Ravi an IIT graduate, Silicon Valley businessman, and member of TIE discussing the roots of the Indian IT industry and its influence on the computing history.
Jul 13, 2010 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Affiliated History Program Presents
The Foundation of Today's Digital World: The Triumph of the MOS Transistor
Join us for a discussion of the often-difficult path to mainstream acceptance of the MOS transistor and its lasting impact on computing and communications. Technology historian, Dr. Ross Bassett, will chair a conversation with three early MOS champions and semiconductor pioneers---David Hodges, Bell Labs and UC Berkeley; Dr. Lewis Terman, IBM and 2008 IEEE president; and Les Vadasz, Fairchild and Intel. Dr. Bassett authored the definitive book on the topic, “To the Digital Age, Research Labs, Start-up Companies, and the Rise of MOS Technology” from John Hopkins University Press.
The MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) transistor, the fundamental building block of digital electronics, is the base technology of late 20th and early 21st century. The story of its development is one of the key chapters in the history of the semiconductor and computing industries. After being the subject of extensive research and vigorous activity among semiconductor pioneers at companies like Fairchild, IBM, RCA, Bell Labs, TI and Intel throughout the 1960s, the MOS transistor first achieved major usage in the 1970’s with DRAMs and microprocessors. When it became the industry standard in the 1980s, the door to the Digital Age was thrown wide open. As a result, tens of thousands of MOS enabled digital products have made their way into offices and homes worldwide, irrevocably changing the human experience.

Join us for a discussion of the often-difficult path to mainstream acceptance of the MOS transistor and its lasting impact on computing and communications. Technology historian, Dr. Ross Bassett, will chair a conversation with three early MOS champions and semiconductor pioneers---David Hodges, Bell Labs and UC Berkeley; Dr. Lewis Terman, IBM and 2008 IEEE president; and Les Vadasz, Fairchild and Intel. Dr. Bassett authored the definitive book on the topic, “To the Digital Age, Research Labs, Start-up Companies, and the Rise of MOS Technology” from John Hopkins University Press.
Jun 23, 2010 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
The Real Revolutionaries, a documentary film about the Fairchild Eight and the birth of high tech in Silicon Valley
The Real Revolutionaries is the last great story of the American West. It is the untold story of America in the ‘60’s. While the hippies got the headlines, a handful of earnest young men dared to dream about the future, then figured out the science to make all their dreams come true.
It all started with a phone call, amplified by a vacuum tube. In 1956, William Shockley recruited an eclectic group of sharp, young minds to help him change the world. Shockley, while at AT&T Bell Labs, had led the research behind the invention of the Transistor, a tiny electrical gadget that would soon make vacuum tubes obsolete. He quit the telephone giant to be his own boss and lead the charge into the great unknown. With his hand-picked team of chemists and physicists, Shockley headed West to a little orchard community along the California coast.

In dusty Santa Clara Valley, just 30 miles from Haight-Ashbury, his boys would start a quiet revolution that would reshape the modern world.

The Real Revolutionaries is the story of Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore and the rest of the Fairchild Eight— the men who built ‘Silicon Valley’ from the ground up. Brought together by a mad genius to build essential components for the Military, they would become the driving force behind the Digital Age. Together they would engineer the integrated circuit,the little invention that remains at the heart of every electronic device in our world today. In the shadow of Vietnam, at a far west outpost of a divided country, the Fairchild Eight reinvented the American Dream: Technology for the greater good. Stock Options for every worker. Venture Capital for every good idea.

A Community effort for a 21st Century. Shockley would end his career in disgrace. Noyce and Moore would found Intel and bring the Microchip to the global market. And today there are almost as many transistors produced in the world market as there are printed characters in all the newspapers, books,
magazines and computer pages combined.

The Real Revolutionaries is the last great story of the American West. It is the untold story of America in the ‘60’s. While the hippies got the headlines, a handful of earnest young men dared to dream about the future, then figured out the science to make all their dreams come true. All it takes is one visionary to start a revolution...
Jun 2 - Jun 3, 2010 6:00 PM Speaker Series
PLATO@50: Seeing the Future Through the Past
This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to meet and learn from an amazing variety of technology innovators, including Don Bitzer, creator of PLATO and co-inventor of the flat-panel gas plasma display, Microsoft's Ray Ozzie (who got his start on PLATO at the University of Illinois), and many others.
Perhaps the greatest untold story in the history of computing is the development of the PLATO system at the University of Illinois and later also at Control Data Corporation. Largely unknown today to the general public, PLATO's list of innovations and seminal influences is considerable. For the first time ever, this event will assemble many of the key people involved with the creation of the PLATO phenomenon.

This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to meet and learn from an amazing variety of technology innovators, including Don Bitzer, creator of PLATO and co-inventor of the flat-panel gas plasma display, Microsoft's Ray Ozzie (who got his start on PLATO at the University of Illinois), and many others.
Jun 2, 2010 6:00 PM Special Events
CHM Presents
PLATO@50 Reunion: Luncheon and Docent-Led Tour
Visit the PLATO@50 Reunion page on Facebook, where you can share your PLATO photos and memories!
May 13, 2010 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Net@40: Visionary Robert W. Taylor in Conversation with National Public Radio's Guy Raz
As part of the Net@40 year-long celebration at the Museum, Bob Taylor and NPR’s Guy Raz will share a stage to discuss the origins of the personal computer revolution and computer networking.
As part of the Net@40 year-long celebration at the Museum, Bob Taylor and NPR’s Guy Raz will share a stage to discuss the origins of the personal computer revolution and computer networking.

Bob Taylor planned to be a Methodist minister, like his father. He ended up an evangelist for an idea that changed the world: easy-to-use computers that talk to each other. “I was never interested in the computer as a mathematical device, but as a communication device,” Taylor said. Taylor’s interests – and his genius for getting them funded – helped develop computer networking, the personal computer, and many of the other technologies that drove the global computer revolution.

As director of ARPA’s Information Processing Techniques office, Taylor funded Doug Engelbart, inventor of the mouse and co-inventor of many of the aspects of computing we take for granted today, from clickable links to multiple windows. Taylor then hired networking pioneer Larry Roberts to oversee the ARPAnet project – the first major experiment in general computer networking, and a key ancestor of the Internet. As founder of the Xerox PARC Computer Systems Laboratory, Taylor went on to recruit and manage the hot-tempered brigade of geniuses who developed the set of features so familiar on our Mac and Windows machines today, including the graphical user interface, Ethernet and laser printing. He also oversaw important work in connecting networks to each other.

Taylor will talk about the process of fostering innovation and share stories of how radical ideas evolve in a discussion with Guy Raz, the weekend host of NPR’s All Things Considered.
Apr 21, 2010 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Net@40: Hackers and Phishers and Carders- Oh My!
The panel will examine the kinds of threats out there, how they've evolved, and what the future may hold. It will also tackle some of the key questions around cybercrime today: Are there steps individuals should take to protect themselves? How important a threat is cyberterrorism? Can society combat cybercrime in ways that don't restrict the net's openness, or civil liberties?
Stalking, scams, theft, underhanded business tactics, vandalism and the like have existed for millennia, and have found ways to exploit emerging technologies from check writing to the telegraph. The Internet age is no exception.

A fair amount of early cybercrime fit the popular image of the pimply-faced teenager in his bedroom, breaking into government networks for the thrill of it. But today a growing class of professional criminals are targeting ordinary users and their private information. Some work alone, while others are part of organized crime groups. Their profits may rival those of illegal drug trafficking. This underground economy has matured into a self-sustaining and geographically diverse global network. Criminals use phony e-mails, fake Web sites, and plant malware on legitimate Websites and online ads. While we're uploading, downloading, transferring and sharing our most personal information, sophisticated criminals may be lurking on the other side of the screen.

The panel will examine the kinds of threats out there, how they've evolved, and what the future may hold. It will also tackle some of the key questions around cybercrime today: Are there steps individuals should take to protect themselves? How important a threat is cyberterrorism? Can society combat cybercrime in ways that don't restrict the net's openness, or civil liberties?
Mar 4, 2010 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Author Kurt W. Beyer in Conversation with Northern California Public Broadcasting’s Linda O’Bryon – Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age
Don’t miss what is certain to be a lively and inspiring discussion, moderated by Northern California Public Broadcasting’s Chief Content Officer Linda O’Bryon.
According to Beyer, Grace Hopper is arguably as important a figure to computing as Bill Gates, Larry Ellison and Steve Jobs, and serves as a responsible, civic-oriented role model for current and future technical and business leaders.

A Hollywood movie about the life of computer pioneer Grace Murray Hopper (1906-1992) would go like this: a young professor abandons the ivy-covered walls of academia to serve her country in the Navy after Pearl Harbor and finds herself on the front lines of the computer revolution. She works hard to succeed in the all-male computer industry, is almost brought down by personal problems but survives them, and ends her career as a celebrated elder stateswoman of computing, a heroine to thousands, hailed as the inventor of computer programming. Throughout Hopper’s later years, the popular media told this simplified version of her life story.

In Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age, Kurt Beyer goes beyond the screen play-ready myth to reveal a more authentic Hopper, a vibrant and complex woman whose career paralleled the meteoric trajectory of the postwar computer industry, and discusses the indelible contribution she made to the nascent computer industry.

Hopper made herself “one of the boys” in Howard Aiken’s wartime Computation Laboratory at Harvard, then moved on to the Eckert and Mauchly Computer Corporation. She was influential in male-dominated military and business organizations at a time when women were encouraged to devote themselves to housework and childbearing. Hopper’s greatest technical achievement was to create the tools that would allow humans to communicate with computers in terms other than ones and zeroes. This advance influenced all future programming and software design and laid the foundation for the development of user-friendly personal computers.

March is Women’s History Month and the Computer History Museum is proud to showcase the career and accomplishments of a genuine innovator, Grace Hopper. Among her many awards, Grace Hopper was the Computer History Museum’s first Fellow award recipient for her development of programming languages, computer instruction, and her lifelong naval service. The complete list of her awards and degrees exceeds two full pages, including the National Medal of Technology and 37 honorary doctoral degrees.

She is most definitely a role model – but not just for women. Author Kurt Beyer, who met Hopper while he was a student at the U.S. Naval Academy, says she influenced his own career choices – first as a naval officer, then as an academic, and finally as an entrepreneur.

Don’t miss what is certain to be a lively and inspiring discussion, moderated by Northern California Public Broadcasting’s Chief Content Officer Linda O’Bryon.
Feb 18, 2010 12:00 PM Special Events
Free Event
IBM ACS System: A Pioneering Supercomputer Project of the 1960's
Please join us to hear former project members describe the exciting atmosphere of the ACS team and the computer design innovations that ACS created.
The showcase IBM effort at high-performance computing in the 1960's has traditionally been considered the IBM S/360 Model 91. That machine well-deserves the attention it has received. In fact, in the field of computer architecture, the decade of the sixties is known for the CDC 6600 and the IBM Model 91, and many modern processors trace features back to those machines.

However, there was another relatively unknown IBM effort that operated in parallel with the deployment of the Model 91. It was launched by IBM Chairman T. J. Watson, Jr., “to come up with something so much better than the [just announced] 6800 as to once more, in the eyes of the public, put IBM far away in the prestige league.”

The project was called Advanced Computing Systems (ACS). It was set up in California specifically to be located far from normal mainframe development on the East Coast as well as to be close to the Livermore National Laboratories and the advanced work on disk drives at IBM’s San Jose facility.

ACS built upon earlier IBM work on Stretch and Stretch-Harvest influenced by the legendary John Cocke, and on IBM’s follow-on “Project Y” at the T. J. Watson Research Center. Most of the Project Y personnel moved to California in 1965 to launch ACS. Many other designers and engineers were recruited and one visitor from Livermore Labs commented that he “had not seen such a high concentration of talent since the Manhattan Project.”

The ACS architecture incorporated innovations that remain important today, including multiple out-of-order dynamic instruction scheduling, multiple condition codes, a decoupled branch architecture, and instruction pre-fetching. Advanced ECL circuits and optimizing compilers were also crucial parts of the plans for ACS. On reflection it appears to have been the first “superscalar” design, and yet its story remains virtually untold to this day.

Please join us to hear former project members describe the exciting atmosphere of the ACS team and the computer design innovations that ACS created.

This event will present two consecutive panel discussions:

Panel 1- Early ACS / also ACS-1 architecture and SW

- Fran Allen, IBM Fellow, Moderator
- Lynn Conway, Emerita Professor of EE/CS, University of Michigan
- Brian Randell, Emeritus Professor of CS and Senior Research Investigator, Newcastle University

Panel 2- Later ACS and dispersion of folks elsewhere after
1969 cancellation / also ACS HW

-Russ Robelen, Moderator
-Bill Mooney
-John Zasio
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2009 Events

Dec 12 - Dec 13, 2009 12:00 PM Special Events
Visible Storage Celebration Weekend
Please join us for a special celebration of the Computer History Museum’s Visible Storage exhibit. The exhibit will be closing in December as the Museum prepares for the major, new exhibition opening in the fall of 2010.
Please join us for a special celebration of the Computer History Museum’s Visible Storage exhibit. The exhibit will be closing in December as the Museum prepares for the major, new exhibition opening in the fall of 2010.

The Celebration and Open House will include a computer holiday sign along on Friday, special set of themed, docent-led tours of the Visible Storage Exhibit on Saturday and Sunday, and an afternoon reception with holiday munchies on Sunday. Saturday & Sunday Events!
Please Register for the day and or tour you would like to attend.
Dec 7, 2009 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with Author Chuck House in Conversation with KQED's Dave Iverson - The HP Phenomenon: Innovation and Business Transformation
Author Chuck House is the only person in the history of HP to win the company’s Award for Meritorious Defiance. KQED's Dave Iverson will moderate a discussion with House on HP's ethos, its spirit of innovation and the complex matter of product and business strategies that drove the Company’s success. He will give us an insider’s view of a HP, whose history and evolution is really the history and evolution, he believes of the Silicon Valley.
Hewlett-Packard – HP – surprisingly to many, is the largest high-tech company on the globe, with its roots and headquarters in Silicon Valley. HP is some 20% larger than IBM today, and no other company is close to half the size of this 0B company. However, HP has not garnered the same attention from computer historians and the media as given to companies like IBM, DEC and Apple. Why? Certainly, having no recent “big name” leader, a la Gates, Jobs or Ellison, and no “big name inventor” a la Bell, Noyce or Moore, and “no blockbuster product” a la Windows, iPod, or the IBM PC hasn’t helped. So, what is it that drove the success of this large and profitable company?

The HP Phenomenon describes how it came to be that HP – never a computing company really – got to this leadership position – in PCs, in printers, in mid-range servers, in GUI designs, in handheld calculators, and even in disc drives, not to mention microcomputer chips, communication chips, and LED display chips. Maybe more importantly, it describes a very different kind of company, one where serendipity and multiple lines of investigation and inquiry lead to very defensible competitive positions against seemingly more focused, more aggressive and more innovative companies. It even explains the unusual symbiosis between Intel, the Japanese memory manufacturers and HP chip and computer system designers that has never been told before – a story in itself that reworked an entire industry as well as competitors.

Author Chuck House is the only person in the history of HP to win the company’s Award for Meritorious Defiance. KQED's Dave Iverson will moderate a discussion with House on HP's ethos, its spirit of innovation and the complex matter of product and business strategies that drove the Company’s success. He will give us an insider’s view of a HP, whose history and evolution is really the history and evolution, he believes of the Silicon Valley.
Nov 20, 2009 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Microprocessor Marketing Wars: Chip Makers Discover the Consumer
Join us for more discussion on how the marketing of microprocessors changed as the semiconductor industry grew at unprecedented rates during the 70’s thru the 90’s. Learn about the events and the decisions that shaped the both the semiconductor and computing industries. Wonder at how annual chip marketing budgets ballooned from $100,000 to over $1Billion in less than 20 years.
The panelists and moderator for this session were all protagonists in these microprocessor marketing wars at three of the major players: AMD, Intel and Motorola.
Ever since the launch of the 4004 microprocessor in 1971, AMD, IBM, Intel, MIPS, Motorola, National, Sun, Texas Instruments, Zilog and many other major corporations have fought epic marketing wars to establish their chips as the engines of choice for multiple generations of computers.

There were battles over technical specifications, performance benchmarks, software architectures, RISC, 32 bits, and much more. Over the years, the fight shifted from one for hardware design engineers’ hearts and minds to a battle for those of the computer companies’ CEOs', and ultimately, for those of the consumers themselves. This combative environment drove the evolution of spec-based to brand-based microprocessor marketing.

Join us for more discussion on how the marketing of microprocessors changed as the semiconductor industry grew at unprecedented rates during the 70’s thru the 90’s. Learn about the events and the decisions that shaped the both the semiconductor and computing industries. Wonder at how annual chip marketing budgets ballooned from $100,000 to over $1Billion in less than 20 years.
The panelists and moderator for this session were all protagonists in these microprocessor marketing wars at three of the major players: AMD, Intel and Motorola.

Speakers and Panelists:
- Jack Browne: Hi End Microprocessor Marketing Manager, Motorola, 1981-1992
- Dave House: Intel SVP - General Manger, Microprocessor business, 1978-81, 1982-91
- Claude Leglise: Intel 8086-8088-286-386-486 Marketing Manager, 1982-1990.
- Melissa Rey: Intel Senior Marketing Communications Manager, Intel X86 (8086
through the 386) communication programs. 1978-1988
Moderated by David Laws: AMD (1975-1986) V.P.Business Development

Join us for this informative and engaging discussion as the Computer History Museum continues celebrating the Salute to the Semiconductor. Major Funding for the Salute to the Semiconductor program is generously provided by Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and Intel Corporation
Nov 10, 2009 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
Please join us for a special celebration of the 50th anniversary of the announcement of the IBM 1401 Data Processing System, the world's most popular computer during most of the 1960s. Activities will include presentations by the original 1401 chief architect, program manager and marketing lead, followed by a Q&A panel session.
Please join us for a special celebration of the 50th anniversary of the announcement of the IBM 1401 Data Processing System, the world's most popular computer during most of the 1960s. Activities will include presentations by the original 1401 chief architect, program manager and marketing lead, followed by a Q&A panel session.

We'll also acknowledge the successful restoration of two 48-year-old IBM 1401 magnetic-tape systems by a team of volunteers. The event at the Museum is being hosted by Jon Iwata, IBM's SVP of Marketing and Communications.

Announced in 1959, the IBM 1401 was widely adopted by business and institutions around the world. By the mid 1960s, half of all computers were 1401s or members of its family. The 1401 was one of IBM’s earliest transistorized computers and introduced thousands of businesses to stored-program computing while its tape and disk systems freed them from the decades-long practice of storing data on punched cards.

Known as a “small-scale computer, a 1401 system weighted 2-to-4 tons, dissipated 12,000 watts, and was built out of over half a million parts. In today's dollars, a typical system rented for $ 45,000 a month or was purchasable for $ 3.4 million. The 1401's popularity was due in part to its legendary peripherals, including its chain-based 1403 printer whose fast speed and outstanding print quality made it into an industry workhorse.

Speakers and Panelists:
- Jon Iwata, IBM Senior VP, Marketing & Communications
- Francis Underwood, IBM 1401 Chief Architect, 1957 - 1960
- Charles Branscomb, IBM 1401 Program Manager, 1957 - 1960
- Sheldon Jacobs, IBM 1401 Marketing Lead, 1958 - 1960
- Robert Garner, IBM 1401 Restoration Project Lead, Computer History Museum, 2004 - 2010
Oct 20, 2009 5:30 PM Special Events
2009 Fellow Awards
Since 1987, the Computer History Museum Fellow Awards annually honors distinguished technology leaders who have forever changed the world with their accomplishments. This prestigious award distinguishes the Fellows’ role in the advancement of computing history, as well as the impact of their contributions: They have truly bettered our lives and our society.
Since 1987, the Computer History Museum Fellow Awards annually honors distinguished technology leaders who have forever changed the world with their accomplishments. This prestigious award distinguishes the Fellows’ role in the advancement of computing history, as well as the impact of their contributions: They have truly bettered our lives and our society.

The Computer History Museum is proud to have a part in highlighting and preserving these esteemed technology heroes’ stories for future generations.

The 2009 Fellow Awards honorees:

Robert R. Everett for his work on the MIT Whirlwind and SAGE computer systems and a lifetime of directing advanced research and development projects.

Don Chamberlin for his fundamental work on structured query language (SQL) and database architectures.

Federico Faggin, Marcian (Ted) Hoff, Stan Mazor and Masatoshi Shima for their work on the Intel 4004, the World's first commercial microprocessor.
Sep 24, 2009 5:00 PM Special Events
CHM Presents
WHIZ KIDS Documentary Film
America’s future rests on the shoulders of our next generation. At a time when our teens lag far behind other countries in math and science, Whiz Kids is a coming-of-age documentary that tells the story of three remarkably different yet equally passionate 17-year-old scientists who vie to compete in the nation’s oldest, most prestigious science competition: Intel Science Talent Search, which was formerly sponsored by Westinghouse.
America’s future rests on the shoulders of our next generation. At a time when our teens lag far behind other countries in math and science, Whiz Kids is a coming-of-age documentary that tells the story of three remarkably different yet equally passionate 17-year-old scientists who vie to compete in the nation’s oldest, most prestigious science competition: Intel Science Talent Search, which was formerly sponsored by Westinghouse.

Win or lose, these ‘whiz kids’ raise questions about class, courage, personal sacrifice, success and failure and in the process, learn as much about themselves as they do about science. From the filmmakers who brought you the Sundance and Emmy Award-winning films Scout's Honor and Girls Like Us comes the new feature length documentary Whiz Kids.

Spitfire Ana Cisneros is a first generation Ecuadorian American whose parents came to the U.S. in search of a better life for their family. The daughter of a former DuPont chemist from West Virginia, Kelydra Welcker is an earnest environmental watchdog. Pakistani-born Harmain Khan is a mercurial teen with enormous ambition.

While the competition itself provides a grueling and emotionally compelling narrative, the filmmakers agreed that the coming of age stories of its contenders would comprise the heart of the film. For a year and a half, they visited high schools around the country searching for teenagers who were engaged in sophisticated research. The team found students, who at 16 and 17, were already working in university and government labs, sometimes alongside Nobel Prize winning scientists. They also found students with fewer resources who were making discoveries in the apocryphal basement or garage lab. Several traits were consistent among these ‘whiz kids’—an insatiable curiosity, a deeply felt determination to communicate their work to the public and a passion to make a difference in the world.



The film-makers included:
- Director and Co-producer Tom Shepard, a teen scientist and a Science Talent Search finalist in 1987;
- Co-directer and co-producer Tina DiFeliciantonio;
- Editor, Writer and Sound-recordist Jane C. Wagner;
- Producer Michael Duca.

Interested in becoming a Whiz Kid?
The deadline for the 2010 Intel Science Talent Search is November 18,2009. For rules, entry form and more information, please visit: http://scisery.org/sts/
Sep 23, 2009 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Total Recall: An Evening with Authors, Jim Gemmell and Gordon Bell... How the E-Memory Revolution will Change Everything
The authors will discuss how Total Recall provides a glimpse of the near future and what this means for you as a member of the digital society. Imagine heart monitors woven into your clothes and tiny wearable audio and visual recorders automatically capturing what you see and hear. The range of potential insights is truly awesome.
What if you could remember everything? Join Jim Gemmell and Gordon Bell as they discuss their new book, “Total Recall – How the E-Memory Revolution will Change Everything.” Bell and Gemmell will draw on their experience from the MyLifeBits project at Microsoft Research to explain the benefits that will come from an earth-shaking and inevitable increase in e-memories.

In 1998, Gordon Bell, began to digitally record as much of his life as possible. Photos, letters, and memorabilia were scanned. Everything he did on his computer was captured. Real time capture of photos, bio-metric data, and phone calls were added.. This experiment – and the system Gemmell designed to support it – put the authors at the center of a movement to understand the creation, use and value of e-memories.

Three streams of technology feed the growing Total Recall revolution — digital recording, digital storage, and digital search. We are capturing and storing so much of our lives now, from the date- and location-stamped photos we take with our smart phones to the continuous records we have of our emails, instant messages, and tweets — not to mention the GPS tracking of our movements smart phones and some cars do automatically. However, the critical technology is to data mine our past, so that we can, for example, chart how much exercise we have been doing now in comparison with what we did four years ago.

The authors will discuss how Total Recall provides a glimpse of the near future and what this means for you as a member of the digital society. Imagine heart monitors woven into your clothes and tiny wearable audio and visual recorders automatically capturing what you see and hear. The range of potential insights is truly awesome.

Gemmell and Bell will also provide their perspectives on how you can begin to take better advantage of this new technology right now. This is a presentation you don’t want to miss to truly grasp the turning point in human knowledge. Bell, Gemmell and their book Total Recall represent a technological revolution that will accomplish nothing less than a transformation in the way humans think about the meaning of their lives.
Jul 30, 2009 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Books, Google and the Future of Digital Print
Please join us as the Computer History Museum presents history in the making to examine this groundbreaking agreement and its many implications for digital print and the public at large.
Books have always played a central role in the evolution and propagation of human culture and knowledge. The topic of digitizing books, in particular, is of special interest to the Computer History Museum's community: On March 1, a standing-room crowd in Hahn Auditorium heard a fascinating discussion on Information Technology and the Future of Books, Publishing, and Libraries in partnership with the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Now CHM takes another step in its exploration of this field by devoting an evening to the discussion of Google's ambitious effort to digitize the world's books.

Join Daniel Clancy, Engineering Director of Google Books, as he discusses Google's historic project to provide greater access to books online. Clancy will talk firsthand about the fundamentals of digitizing books, the recent settlement agreement between Google, authors and publishers, and the implications he sees for the business, publishing and academic communities (see Background below).

Our second speaker, John Hollar, CEO of the Computer History Museum, is a former senior executive in the publishing industry. He will draw upon his rich experience in books and online media to examine with Clancy what the Google Books agreement means for users' ability to access content online, and to inform the audience about the substance (or possibly lack thereof) in the public discussion and discourse on the subject.

Background
In October 2008, Google and a broad class of authors and publishers announced an agreement to settle the lawsuits brought against Google Books. The lawsuits alleged copyright violation for scanning pages of copyrighted works for purposes of indexing and providing snippets.

If approved by the court, the agreement offers unprecedented opportunities for users to access the wealth of information found in books. Google's view, and that of many scholars, readers, librarians, and book creators, is that the agreement opens the door to greater information for users, as well as greater competition and innovation in the digital print market.

Some have been making the case that the agreement will give Google an unfair edge in selling books, in particular the so-called orphan and out-of-print books. In October 2009, the court will hold a hearing to consider objections and determine whether the settlement is to be approved.

Please join us as the Computer History Museum presents history in the making to examine this groundbreaking agreement and its many implications for digital print and the public at large. Please note that this event will also include an extensive Q&A session with attendees.
Jul 22, 2009 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Programmable Logic: Computing Bit by Bit
Steve Trimberger, holder of over 150 PLD patents and Xilinx Fellow, will discuss the challenges and key milestones in the development of programmable logic and its impact on computing history. He will outline the successes and failures of configurable computing, and discuss the prospects for the future in this thought provoking session. Join us as the CHM continues celebrating the Salute to the Semiconductor with this Soundbyte event on Wednesday, July 22, 2009. Bring your brown bag lunch and enjoy this informative and engaging discussion from 12 pm to 1 pm at the Computer History Museum!
With the introduction of the first commercial programmable logic devices (PLD) in the mid-'70s, the door was opened to a host of applications including telecommunications, audio and video broadcasting and storage where the combination of performance, cost and power efficiency are particularly important.

Programmable logic blurs the line between software and hardware. These chips contain a program in its memory that allows them to be re-programmed. That sounds like software. But the program creates logic gates and wires connecting them. That sounds like hardware. Performance improvement gained by using programmable logic instead of microprocessors can be a factor of one hundred, with comparable power reduction to match. But today we don't see programmable logic computers. Or at least, we don't know them when we see them. Do we need new definitions and new dividing lines?

Steve Trimberger, holder of over 150 PLD patents and Xilinx Fellow, will discuss the challenges and key milestones in the development of programmable logic and its impact on computing history. He will outline the successes and failures of configurable computing, and discuss the prospects for the future in this thought provoking session. Join us as the CHM continues celebrating the Salute to the Semiconductor with this Soundbyte event on Wednesday, July 22, 2009. Bring your brown bag lunch and enjoy this informative and engaging discussion from 12 pm to 1 pm at the Computer History Museum!
Jun 30, 2009 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with Gary Reback In Conversation with Michael Arrington of TechCrunch
Join Gary Reback, author of the new book Free the Market! in conversation with Michael Arrington of TechCrunch to discuss how the Obama Administration’s antitrust enforcement policies will affect Silicon Valley’s economy.
Join Gary Reback, author of the new book Free the Market! in conversation with Michael Arrington of TechCrunch to discuss how the Obama Administration’s antitrust enforcement policies will affect Silicon Valley’s economy.

Drawing on vivid, behind-the-scenes accounts of leading high tech lawsuits – involving top companies like Apple, Microsoft, IBM, Oracle and AT&T – Reback’s new book paints a tableau of government policy gone awry. “You can read his account as eyewitness history, a memoir of legal warfare,” wrote Scott Herhold in the San Jose Mercury News. “Free the Market! is a white paper meant to influence a new government in Washington D.C.”

Reback and Arrington will examine President Obama’s commitment to innovation along with his promise of renewed antitrust enforcement to make predictions about how the new administration will answer important questions.

- Should antitrust enforcers stop worrying about Microsoft?
- When will the Justice Department sue Google?
- Is industry consolidation good for the Valley? Is it legal?
- Will the government challenge the assertions of patents by giant patent pools?
- What does antitrust say about companies that are “too big to fail”?
Jun 25, 2009 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Into the Future: Man and Machines | In Conversation with Intel CTO Justin Rattner Moderated by Kate Greene of MIT’s Technology Review
Justin Rattner, Intel Corporation's Chief Technology Officer takes a fascinating look at how technology will bring man and machines much closer together.
Justin Rattner, Intel Corporation's Chief Technology Officer takes a fascinating look at how technology will bring man and machines much closer together. He predicts big changes are ahead in social interactions, robotics and improvements in computer's ability to sense the real world. Rattner believes that we may be approaching an inflection point where the rate of technology advancements is accelerating at an exponential rate, and as a result, machines could overtake humans in their ability to reason, in the not so distant future.

Kate Greene, Information Technology Editor at the MIT Technology Review will join Justin Rattner to discuss the many important emerging innovations in semiconductor and other computing technologies that will make human and machine interaction more robust, perhaps sooner than any of us expect!

Their interesting and revealing SoundByte discussion, “Into the Future: Man and Machines” will be held 12:00-1:00 pm on Thursday June 25th as part of the CHM’s 2009 “Salute to the Semiconductor”.
Jun 11, 2009 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with NetApp Founder Dave Hitz
Having been ranked #1 on FORTUNE magazine 2009 “Best Companies to Work For” List, NetApp makes for a great case study for Silicon Valley tech companies. Join us when Dave Hitz, co-founder and executive vice president at NetApp, shares his insights on growing a company from 3 to over 8,000 people and the major business cycle NetApp had to go through to get there —from the jack-of-all-trades mentality of a start-up, to the tumultuous period of the dot-com boom and bust, and finally to a mature enterprise company. He'll also share stories and anecdotes from his new book: How to Castrate a Bull: Unexpected Lessons on Risk, Growth, and Success in Business.
Having been ranked #1 on FORTUNE magazine 2009 “Best Companies to Work For” List, NetApp makes for a great case study for Silicon Valley tech companies. Join us when Dave Hitz, co-founder and executive vice president at NetApp, shares his insights on growing a company from 3 to over 8,000 people and the major business cycle NetApp had to go through to get there —from the jack-of-all-trades mentality of a start-up, to the tumultuous period of the dot-com boom and bust, and finally to a mature enterprise company. He'll also share stories and anecdotes from his new book: How to Castrate a Bull: Unexpected Lessons on Risk, Growth, and Success in Business.

Dave Hitz and James Lau founded NetApp in 1992, with a desire to simplify storage the way Cisco simplified networking. Hitz and Lau believed that general-purpose computing systems were too complex, so they built dedicated devices called appliances. These appliances were designed to handle one thing well: data storage.

Prior to 1992, Hitz worked as a senior engineer at Auspex Corporation, an enterprise storage solutions provider, where he was responsible for file systems and microkernel design. He also held engineering positions at MIPS Computer, focusing on file system and I/O subsystem design for the System V kernel development effort. Before his career in the computer industry, Hitz worked as a cowboy, gaining valuable management experience by herding, branding, and castrating cattle.

Hitz holds a bachelor's degree in computer science and electrical engineering from Princeton University.
May 14, 2009 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
In Conversation with Judy Estrin-Closing the Innovation Gap: Reigniting the Spark of Creativity in a Global Economy
Join us for a lunchtime talk with our CEO, John Hollar as he speaks with serial entrepreneur and business advisor, Judy Estrin.
Join us for a lunchtime talk with our CEO, John Hollar as he speaks with serial entrepreneur and business advisor, Judy Estrin.

Judith L. Estrin, is Chief Executive Officer of JLABS, LLC, (formerly Packet Design Management Company, LLC), a privately-held company focused on furthering innovation in business, government and non-profit organizations. Prior to co-founding Packet Design in 2000, Estrin was chief technology officer for Cisco Systems. Beginning in 1981, Estrin co-founded three other successful technology companies: Bridge Communications, Network Computing Devices, and Precept Software. In 1998 Cisco Systems acquired Precept, and she became Cisco's chief technology officer until April 2000.

John Hollar will speak with Judy about her book, Closing the Innovation Gap: Reigniting the Spark of Creativity in a Global Economy (McGraw- Hill; Hardcover), a general interest book that challenges national, academic and business leaders to work together to make America competitive again.

Estrin has been named three times to Fortune Magazine's list of the 50 most powerful women in American business. She sits on the boards of directors of The Walt Disney Company and FedEx Corporation as well as two private company boards – Packet Design, Inc. and Arch Rock. She also sits on the advisory councils of Stanford's School of Engineering and Stanford's Bio-X initiative. She holds a B.S. degree in math and computer science from UCLA, and an M.S. in electrical engineering from Stanford University.
May 2 - May 8, 2009 7:00 PM Special Events
Salute to the Semoconductor
50th Anniversary to the Integrated Circuit
The Computer History Museum is partnering with the Chemical Heritage Foundation and the IEEE Santa Clara Valley Section to celebrate the 50th anniversary of these transformative developments.
As the basic building block of digital electronics, the integrated circuit -- the "chip" -- has profoundly transformed societies across the globe. Reflecting this impact, Isaac Asimov once described the innovation of the integrated circuit as “the most important moment since man emerged as a life form.”

The late 1950s and early 1960s was an extraordinary period of development in semiconductor electronics. Military interest in, and the semiconductor industry’s pursuit of diverse approaches to microcircuitry took off in the second half of the 1950s. 1959 saw a burst of intellectual activity across the industry as Jack Kilby of Texas Instruments, along with Jean Hoerni and Robert Noyce of Fairchild Semiconductor, and others, filed patent applications that held keys to the development of the modern integrated circuit. Jay Last’s team at Fairchild, which would create the first planar integrated circuits, also began their efforts in 1959.

The Computer History Museum is partnering with the Chemical Heritage Foundation and the IEEE Santa Clara Valley Section to celebrate the 50th anniversary of these transformative developments. Major funding for Salute to the Semiconductor is generously provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Intel Corporation. Additional funding for the IC@50 events is provided by the National Semiconductor Foundation, a charitable fund at the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.
Apr 16, 2009 12:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Flashback: A Story of Flash Memory
This CHM Soundbytes will feature a panel discussion of the team that conceived Intel's NOR-type flash memory and brought it to market: Program Director Dick Pashley, Technologist Stefan Lai, Chip Designer Niles Kynett and Marketing Manager Bruce McCormick. Together they will tell the story of Intel's flash memory work and how their skunk works produced an industry-leading standard. CHM's Jeff Katz from the Museum's Semiconductor SIG will host this panel of flash memory pioneers.
Through the late 1980’s, branded microprocessors were getting all the credit in consumers' eyes for the rapid improvement in computing power. However the development of flash memory technology offered a pivotal leap forward in storage capability that enabled an equally significant revolution in mobile personal computing devices, including PDAs, mobile phones, GPS devices, handheld gaming and media players.

Fujio Masuoka developed the flash memory cell at Toshiba, Japan in 1984. The industry's first commercially successful flash memory products emerged from a skunk works team at Intel in 1988. With later enhancements by SanDisk, Samsung and others, flash remains today's most widely used non-volatile memory (NVM) technology form.

This CHM Soundbytes will feature a panel discussion of the team that conceived Intel's NOR-type flash memory and brought it to market: Program Director Dick Pashley, Technologist Stefan Lai, Chip Designer Niles Kynett and Marketing Manager Bruce McCormick. Together they will tell the story of Intel's flash memory work and how their skunk works produced an industry-leading standard. CHM's Jeff Katz from the Museum's Semiconductor SIG will host this panel of flash memory pioneers.
Apr 15, 2009 5:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
David Alan Grier – "Too Soon to Tell: Essays for the End of the Computer Revolution"
The Revolution is Over. The computer has won. It occupies a place in every aspect of our lives. Yet, we know little about the revolutionaries, the people who changed the world with computing technology.
The Revolution is Over. The computer has won. It occupies a place in every aspect of our lives. Yet, we know little about the revolutionaries, the people who changed the world with computing technology.

Too Soon to Tell, David Alan Grier's newest book, tries to capture the lives of the people who developed computing technology and help us understand the sacrifices they made, the decisions they faced and the world they left behind. It is a book of essays, that explores the human landscape that welcomed the computer in the 1946, and guided its development over sixty years. These essays are built around a collection of unforgettable characters who help explain the nature of the computer age. These characters include the unstoppable Ro who, uncovered the obscene operating system; Bohannon, the fast talking computer marketeer; Mark, the programmer who was trying to make a living in Armenia; and, of course, Grier's father, who shepherded a community of computer users.

Grier, long-time columnist for Computer magazine, will join us for evening at the Computer History Museum to talk about the human side of the computer industry and the many individuals who helped build that industry. It will be an evening of insights and stories, as he talks about the essays in Too Soon to Tell. He will talk about the fascinating relationships that have worked in this industry and will explore that powerful relationship that has connected people and machines and institutions in the brief span of time that has marked the computer age.
Mar 30, 2009 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Virtual Worlds, the Origins and Evolution of a New Medium
Like the invention of the motion picture in the late nineteenth century, the virtual world of the late twentieth century is a new way of human interaction. Of course, the Virtual World diverges from the medium of film in many important ways particularly in that it is not a passive medium, but is instead interactive and immersive—in which everyone is an actor.
Like the invention of the motion picture in the late nineteenth century, the virtual world of the late twentieth century is a new way of human interaction. Of course, the Virtual World diverges from the medium of film in many important ways particularly in that it is not a passive medium, but is instead interactive and immersive—in which everyone is an actor.

In the Virtual Worlds industry of the early twenty-first century we are now witnessing the rise of great directors creating masterfully crafted experiences; the coming of voice like the talkies of the 1920s; the large and expensive grid-based worlds akin to the big sets of the studio system;” and the numerous small worlds projects which feel like early independent films. Machinima, the use of Virtual Worlds to create short movies, is another fascinating parallel.

For this special evening panel we have convened an in-person group of avatars of the medium of Social Virtual Worlds, in which the users create most of the spaces and interactions within them.

Our panelists include one of the creators of the first avatars, a leading practitioner of in-world life, a business visionary behind the studio system of Virtual Worlds, and a journalist/pundit of in-world and off-world news and views of the inhabitants and industry.

Bruce Damer, a Virtual Worlds pioneer, visionary and historian will lead off with a condensed history of the medium and then pose key questions to the panel and the audience about where the medium is today and where it may be headed.
Mar 10, 2009 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with 2008 Fellow Awardee Bob Metcalfe in Conversation with Cisco SVP Kathy Hill
Metcalfe will sit down with Cisco Senior Vice President Kathy Hill to discuss his experiences in the technology industry, life lessons and current passions. He has been very active in finding a solution for the world’s energy challenge and identifying the innovations (and innovators) who will meet that challenge. Join the CHM community as we celebrate the work of this remarkable individual.
Bob Metcalfe was awarded a 2008 Fellow Award by the Computer History Museum for leading the invention, standardization, and commercialization of the Ethernet local-area networking system for PCs.

With a solid history of technology pioneering work under his belt, Metcalfe is currently a partner at Polaris Ventures. He has had three careers in technological innovation before becoming a venture capitalist, working with the next generation of innovators and emerging technologies.

• As an engineer-scientist (1965-1979), Metcalfe helped pioneer the Internet. In 1973, at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, he invented Ethernet, the local-area networking (LAN) standard on which he shares four patents. Now, 35 years later, about 350 million new Ethernet ports are shipped annually.

• As an entrepreneur-executive (1979-1990), he founded 3Com Corporation, the billion-dollar networking company where at various times he was Chairman, CEO, division general manager, and vice president of engineering, sales, and marketing.

• As a publisher-pundit (1990-2000), Metcalfe was CEO of IDG's InfoWorld Publishing Company (1992-1995). For eight years, he opined about the Internet in an InfoWorld column read weekly by half a million information technologists.

Metcalfe will sit down with Cisco Senior Vice President Kathy Hill to discuss his experiences in the technology industry, life lessons and current passions. He has been very active in finding a solution for the world’s energy challenge and identifying the innovations (and innovators) who will meet that challenge. Join the CHM community as we celebrate the work of this remarkable individual.
Feb 4, 2009 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Richard S. Tedlow, Harvard Business School Professor and Historian, presents the Intel 386 Case For Teens
Join Harvard Business School Professor Richard S. Tedlow's presentation about Intel, the company that drove the business innovations during the 1980s, which have led us to where we are today. Learn how HBS teaches using the Case Method, where you can ask questions and draw conclusions while the professor creates an interactive discussion environment!
Harvard Business School Presents the Intel 386 Case for Teens

It goes without saying that kids and teens in this day and age have grown up with and can’t live without tech gadgets, right? Internet chatting on the laptop, Xbox 360s, PSPs and iPods all have come from the all-mighty microprocessor.

And how did the tech companies during the 1980s make decisions to innovate on the clunkier technology of their day and how did they arrive at today's standards, where we can hold everything in our hands?

Join Harvard Business School Professor Richard S. Tedlow's presentation about Intel, the company that drove the business innovations during the 1980s, which have led us to where we are today. Learn how HBS teaches using the Case Method, where you can ask questions and draw conclusions while the professor creates an interactive discussion environment!

The Museum will provide enough pizza for everyone, and the entire event is FREE for all. Teens can come with parents or on their own. We welcome kids of all ages.
Jan 26, 2009 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes
Richard S. Tedlow, Harvard Business School Professor and Historian, Leads the Intel 386 Case
Professor Tedlow will present the business case, as taught in his Harvard Business School classes, to describe how these important decisions were made and what valuable lessons we can learn from Intel’s industry-changing business choices.
Under the leadership of Andy Grove and Gordon Moore, the personal computer market changed in October 1985 with the launch of the Intel 80386. Today, no one will dispute that Intel is a world-leading company, but few recall that Intel’s path to its position as technology giant was solidified by way of an unprecedented business strategy. Join Harvard Business School Professor and CHM Board Member Richard S. Tedlow as he reviews the sole-source supplier business strategy with the CHM audience.

Learn how Intel forever changed the landscape of the computing industry with its decision in the mid-1980s to act as the sole source for its revolutionary 386 microprocessor. Prior to this risky and unorthodox move, companies would “second-source” products by licensing their technology to competitors – the way it was always done. The 386 marked the end of second-sourcing and the beginning of Intel’s leadership as a components-supplier in the personal computer market. But why was this significant and what did it mean to the future of the microprocessor and the future of personal computers?

Professor Tedlow will present the business case, as taught in his Harvard Business School classes, to describe how these important decisions were made and what valuable lessons we can learn from Intel’s industry-changing business choices.
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2008 Events

Dec 16, 2008 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Hail to the Historians
Remix – Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy
During the presentation, Professor Lessig will expound on these concepts, as he maps out in his latest book Remix – Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy: Our past teaches us about the value in 'remix.' We need to relearn the lesson. The present teaches us about the potential in a new 'hybrid economy' — one where commercial entities leverage value from sharing economies. That future will benefit both commerce and community. If the lawyers could get out of the way, it could be a future we could celebrate.
The prolific and controversial web culture of piracy, particularly file sharing, has taken the world by storm, and for more than a decade, we’ve been waging a war in the name of the 20th Century’s model of copyright law.

The content industry has convinced the world that extremism in copyright regulation is good for business and economic growth. But that's false. Join Stanford Law Professor Lawrence Lessig as he discusses the potential creative accomplishments that our society could achieve, if only we viewed copyright and intellectual property (IP) laws differently.

During the presentation, Professor Lessig will expound on these concepts, as he maps out in his latest book Remix – Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy: Our past teaches us about the value in 'remix.' We need to relearn the lesson. The present teaches us about the potential in a new 'hybrid economy' — one where commercial entities leverage value from sharing economies. That future will benefit both commerce and community. If the lawyers could get out of the way, it could be a future we could celebrate.
Nov 20, 2008 12:00 PM Speaker Series
Hail to the Historians
The Secret History of Silicon Valley
Hear the story of how two major events – WWII and the Cold War – and one Stanford professor set the stage for the creation and explosive growth of entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley. In true startup form, the world was forever changed when the CIA and the National Security Agency acted as venture capitalists for this first wave of entrepreneurship. Learn about the key players and the series of events that contributed to this dramatic and important piece of the emergence of this world renowned technology mecca.
While Silicon Valley is responsible for the wealth of millions of people, not many are familiar with its long and complex history. Unbeknownst to even the most seasoned inhabitant or observer, Silicon Valley, Northern California’s peninsula, was shaped by many forces.

Join renowned serial entrepreneur, Steve Blank, as he provides an overview on the secret history of Silicon Valley and how the Valley got its start. Much like the startups that have made Silicon Valley famous, the Valley began in a strikingly similar formula.

Hear the story of how two major events – WWII and the Cold War – and one Stanford professor set the stage for the creation and explosive growth of entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley. In true startup form, the world was forever changed when the CIA and the National Security Agency acted as venture capitalists for this first wave of entrepreneurship. Learn about the key players and the series of events that contributed to this dramatic and important piece of the emergence of this world renowned technology mecca.
Nov 5, 2008 5:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
The 40th Anniversary of the Dynabook
Join Steve Hamm of BusinessWeek as he moderates a panel discussion to celebrate this idea that provided metaphor, motivation and inventions for the personal computers of today.
The roots of “personal computers” – that is, machines that are not shared between users – date back to at least the late 1950s. Within a decade, several more of these “one machine, one user” computers were developed; and the idea of a user having direct control over the computer was established, at least within academia.

In 1968, young computer scientist Alan Kay gave a presentation on the FLEX Machine at a meeting of computer science graduate students and saw the first working versions of a new flat panel plasma display technology. This led to discussions about how nice it would be to (someday) place the FLEX computer itself on the back of such a display to make a notebook-sized computer.

A visit a few months later to MIT computer scientist and educator Seymour Papert and to a school with children doing advanced math with Papert’s LOGO programming language, produced an epiphany in Kay. He decided to make “A Personal Computer For Children Of All Ages.” This was to be in the form of a compact notebook using both tablet and keyboard, a flat-screen display, GUI, and the wireless networking that defense funding agency ARPA was starting to experiment with.

This idea eventually acquired the name “Dynabook” as an homage to what the printed book has meant to civilization and learning. It is also a gesture to a future in which not just the content of “books” will be dynamic, but the relationship of people to computers will itself also change.

The founding of Xerox PARC a few years after the Dynabook concept provided support and a context for developing many of these ideas. In fact, the PARC “Alto” workstation was originally called “the interim Dynabook”. Many of the results from this research influenced commercial computing, including the bit-mapped screen, high-quality text and graphics, overlapping windows and an icon-based GUI, desktop publishing, object-oriented programming, and many others.

Join Steve Hamm of BusinessWeek as he moderates a panel discussion to celebrate this idea that provided metaphor, motivation and inventions for the personal computers of today.

This event is generously sponsored by One Laptop Per Child (laptop.org).

Panelists:
- Alan Kay
- Charles Thacker
- Mary Lou Jepsen
Oct 27, 2008 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Co-hosted by the Computer History Museum and Churchill Club
An Evening with Sam Wyly in Conversation with Dixon Doll
You won’t want to miss this rare opportunity to hear from Sam Wyly, who Walter Isaacson, CEO of the Aspen Institute calls, "a wonderful American character, a natural entrepreneur, businessman and philanthropist with an outsized personality and humor to match his success."
Sam Wyly: From $1,000 and an Idea to Billionaire

Sam Wyly may be one of the most successful entrepreneurs you’ve never heard of. Despite his below-the-radar approach, he is one of those rare serial success stories who has launched and led best-of-breed companies in a wide range of industries including technology, energy, retail, and investments:

- With an idea for the first computer utility and $1,000 in savings, Wyly founded University Computing. Two years later, he took the company public and made his first million.
- Launched software companies Sterling Software and Sterling Commerce which were sold for $8 billion.
- Co-founded Maverick Capital in 1990. At the end of 2006, the company had over $9 billion in assets.
- Grew the modest Bonanza Steakhouse chain to 600 restaurants by 1989 when Wyly sold the chain.
- Expanded Michaels, a small arts-and-crafts company, into more than 900 stores. The chain was sold to private equity firms in 2006 for $6 billion.
- Created Green Mountain Energy, arguably the most profitable green energy business in America.

Sitting down with noted Valley VC Dixon Doll, Wyly will talk about the vision, creative processes, challenges, and relationships that have taken him on the road to his extraordinary success. He will speak honestly, as he does in his recent memoir, 1,000 Dollars and an Idea: Entrepreneur to Billionaire, of both the wins and the losses as well as the lessons learned throughout his career: Failure is crucial to achieving success, independent thought is imperative, luck serendipitous and power useless unless it is wielded for good. Wyly and Doll will also discuss: What does it take to be successful in today’s marketplace? What traits are critical for cross-industry success? What mistakes does he see many entrepreneurs making?

You won’t want to miss this rare opportunity to hear from Sam Wyly, who Walter Isaacson, CEO of the Aspen Institute calls, "a wonderful American character, a natural entrepreneur, businessman and philanthropist with an outsized personality and humor to match his success." Please note: This event is only open to the Computer History Museum's members and Churchill Club's community.
Oct 22, 2008 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with 2008 Fellow Awardee, Jean Jennings Bartik - One of the first programmers of the 1945 ENIAC computing system
In conversation with Linda O'Bryon, Bartik also will discuss:
- Leading the programming team to convert ENIAC to one of the first stored-program machines (and working with Dr. John von Neumann on ENIAC's first instruction set)
- Working in “Technical Camelot” at the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation, as programmer of BINAC and logic designer of UNIVAC
- Sexism and stereotypes at Remington Rand and her first-hand experience with the abuse of women and the misuse of technology
- Friends and pioneers computing history should not forget, including tributes to Betty Holberton, Kay Mauchly Antonelli, the other ENIAC programmers, Dr. John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert
Born on a farm in Missouri, the sixth of seven children, Jean Jennings Bartik always went in search of adventure. Bartik majored in mathematics at Northwest Missouri State Teachers College (now Northwest Missouri State University). During her college years, WWII broke out, and in 1945, at age 20, Bartik answered the government's call for women math majors to join a project in Philadelphia calculating ballistics firing tables for the new guns developed for the war effort. A new employee of the Army's Ballistics Research Labs, she joined over 80 women calculating ballistics trajectories (differential calculus equations) by hand - her title: “Computer.”

Later in 1945, the Army circulated a call for computers for a new job with a secret machine. Bartik jumped at the chance and was hired as one of the original six programmers of ENIAC, the first all-electronic, programmable computer. She joined Frances “Betty” Snyder Holberton, Kathleen McNulty Mauchly Antonelli, Marlyn Wescoff Meltzer, Ruth Lichterman Teitelbaum and Frances Bilas Spence in this unknown journey.

With ENIAC's 40 panels still under construction, and its 18,000 vacuum tube technology uncertain, the engineers had no time for programming manuals or classes. Bartik and the other women taught themselves ENIAC's operation from its logical and electrical block diagrams, and then figured out how to program it. They created their own flow charts, programming sheets, wrote the program and placed it on the ENIAC using a challenging physical interface, which had hundreds of wires and 3,000 switches. It was an unforgettable, wonderful experience.

On February 15, 1946, the Army revealed the existence of ENIAC to the public. In a special ceremony, the Army introduced ENIAC and its hardware inventors Dr. John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert. The presentation featured its trajectory ballistics program, operating at a speed thousands of time faster than any prior calculations. The ENIAC women's program worked perfectly - and conveyed the immense calculating power of ENIAC and its ability to tackle the millennium problems that had previously taken a man 100 years to do. It calculated the trajectory of a shell that took 30 seconds to trace it. But, it took ENIAC only 20 seconds to calculate it - faster than a speeding bullet! Indeed!

The Army never introduced the ENIAC women.

No one gave them any credit or discussed their critical part in the event that day. Their faces, but not their names, became part of the beautiful press pictures of the ENIAC. For forty years, their roles and their pioneering work were forgotten and their story lost to history. The ENIAC Women's story was discovered by Kathy Kleiman in 1985. Bartik will discuss what it means to be overlooked, despite unique and pioneering work, and what it means to be discovered again.

In conversation with Linda O'Bryon, Bartik also will discuss:
- Leading the programming team to convert ENIAC to one of the first stored-program machines (and working with Dr. John von Neumann on ENIAC's first instruction set)
- Working in “Technical Camelot” at the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation, as programmer of BINAC and logic designer of UNIVAC
- Sexism and stereotypes at Remington Rand and her first-hand experience with the abuse of women and the misuse of technology
- Friends and pioneers computing history should not forget, including tributes to Betty Holberton, Kay Mauchly Antonelli, the other ENIAC programmers, Dr. John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert
Oct 21, 2008 5:30 PM Special Events
CHM Presents
2008 Fellow Awards
Since 1987, the Computer History Museum Fellow Awards annually honors distinguished technology leaders who have forever changed the world with their accomplishments. This prestigious award distinguishes the Fellows’ role in the advancement of computing history, as well as the impact of their contributions: They have truly bettered our lives and our society.
Since 1987, the Computer History Museum Fellow Awards annually honors distinguished technology leaders who have forever changed the world with their accomplishments. This prestigious award distinguishes the Fellows’ role in the advancement of computing history, as well as the impact of their contributions: They have truly bettered our lives and our society.

The Computer History Museum is proud to have a part in highlighting and preserving these esteemed technology heroes’ stories for future generations.

The 2008 Fellow Awards honorees:
- Jean Bartik was one of the first programmers of the groundbreaking ENIAC computing system in 1945. She later assisted in converting the ENIAC system into one of the first stored-program computers.
- Bob Metcalfe led the invention, standardization, and commercialization of Ethernet.
- Linus Torvalds created the Linux kernel and oversaw open source development of the widely used Linux operating system.
Sep 11, 2008 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
IBM Stretch: The Forgotten Computer that Helped Spark a Revolution
Please join us for a very special celebration of a little-known, yet incredibly important, chapter in computing history. IBM’s STRETCH program for the Government’s Los Alamos lab, later its commercial offering as IBM 7030, was IBM’s audacious gamble at creating the world’s most advanced computing system: “about 100 times faster than the most advanced computer working today” according to then IBM chairman Tom Watson, Jr.
Please join us for a very special celebration of a little-known, yet incredibly important, chapter in computing history. IBM’s STRETCH program for the Government’s Los Alamos lab, later its commercial offering as IBM 7030, was IBM’s audacious gamble at creating the world’s most advanced computing system: “about 100 times faster than the most advanced computer working today” according to then IBM chairman Tom Watson, Jr.

This is a story about one of the most remarkable computer projects ever, one largely unknown to the general public, but which shaped the lives of all of us by defining what computers could do.

Design began in the summer of 1956, with a project team that eventually grew to 300 by 1959. When introduced, the Stretch was considered a failure within IBM as it did not meet advertised expectations: it was indeed the fastest computer available, but was only 30 to 40 times faster than other systems (not 100 times as advertised).

The Success of Stretch: Even though initial commercial expectations were not fully met, the technical, manufacturing, and managerial experience that came from creating Stretch fed directly into other IBM projects, including its System/360 – the single most successful family of computers (by revenue) of all time.

Concepts pioneered for Stretch are now used in the world’s most advanced microprocessors. These include:
- Multiprogramming, enabling a computer to juggle more than one job at a time
- Memory protection, preventing unauthorized memory access
- Memory interleaving, breaking up memory into chunks for much higher bandwidth
- Pipelining, lining up instructions in a queue, so that the computer doesn’t have to wait between operations

Join our moderator, Steve Lohr of The New York Times as he discusses the project’s challenges and successes with Stretch pioneers.

This event will review the technology landscape of the mid-1950s, the computing needs that spawned the Stretch program and the huge technical challenges that had to be overcome. It will also examine the legacy of Stretch innovations, how they provided the foundation of the world-changing System/360 mainframe and several components are still part of the fabric of computing today, in everything from laptops to iPods.

Panelists:
- Fran Allen, IBM, former Research Staff Member for Stretch
- Fred Brooks, former Advisory System Planner for Stretch
- Harwood Kolsky, former Member of the Stretch Product Planning Department
Aug 14, 2008 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Hail to the Historians
Richard S. Tedlow, Harvard Business School Professor and Historian, Leads the IBM 360 HBS Case
Professor Tedlow will discuss the story of IBM as the leading technology company in the 1960s taking a huge risk in developing a new family of computers – a financial investment approximately three times its annual sales (1960). In 1966, Fortune magazine called this “perhaps the riskiest business judgment” of the era.
Professor Tedlow will discuss the story of IBM as the leading technology company in the 1960s taking a huge risk in developing a new family of computers – a financial investment approximately three times its annual sales (1960). In 1966, Fortune magazine called this “perhaps the riskiest business judgment” of the era.

In 1964, IBM held press conferences in 62 US cities and 14 countries around the world, where Thomas Watson, Jr., the Chairman of the Board, and CEO announced that the new System/360 was “a sharp departure from the concepts of the past.” There were to be six separate compatible machines, with interchangeable memories, providing 19 different combinations, and a total of 40 peripherals. No other company had ever introduced six computer models of totally new design, at one time, in a technology never tested in the marketplace, and with programming abilities of the greatest complexity.

Join Professor Richard S. Tedlow, as he facilitates an interactive discussion, which analyzes this very high risk, very high reward business decision. With history as the teacher, Tedlow will ask probing questions as he leads the debate on such issues as:
- Why would a company that’s leading the market attempt a project of such immense financial and technological risk?
- What were the key success factors for the IBM 360? What was the “secret sauce” in the company culture that allowed its people to succeed with this startling innovation?
- Why was it possible for a non-technical CEO, like Watson to manage such a technologically complex project? Would this be possible in today’s technological climate?
- What can Google learn from this lesson? Microsoft?
- What can other great companies learn about change and innovation from this business decision?
Jun 13, 2008 12:00 PM Speaker Series
Hail to the Historians
CSIRAC - One of the Only Intact First Generation Computers Left on the Planet
The fourth computer in the world, CSIRAC (pronounced 'sigh-rack') (1949 – 1964) was designed and built in Australia. It made its first successful test run in November 1949. CSIRAC is derived from Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Automatic Computer. An international icon of the digital age, CSIRAC is the only intact first-generation computer surviving anywhere in the world.
The fourth computer in the world, CSIRAC (pronounced 'sigh-rack') (1949 – 1964) was designed and built in Australia. It made its first successful test run in November 1949. CSIRAC is derived from Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Automatic Computer. An international icon of the digital age, CSIRAC is the only intact first-generation computer surviving anywhere in the world.

CSIRAC’s story began in 1936, when British mathematician Alan Turing described his idea for a computing machine capable of solving any numerical problem.

The first steps to building such a machine were undertaken during the Second World War (1939–45). Spurred on by military needs, British researchers built huge electro-mechanical calculators and electronic machines to decipher secret German codes.
At the same time in the United States, a series of enormous machines was constructed to solve complex mathematical problems, including calculating the trajectories of artillery shells.

After the war, scientists and engineers developed Turing’s concept into the idea of a stored-program computer. In this versatile machine, both programs and data could be entered as a digital code (0s and 1s), and the programs could make decisions, based upon the current state of the data, and draw upon further sub-programs if required.

The honor of building the first modern computer went to the British, when ‘Baby’ computed its first result on 21 June 1948, in Manchester.

During this period, a young English scientist in Sydney had already been planning the development of a machine to bring Australia into the computer age…

Websites provided during David Demant's lecture:
-CSIRAC, Museum Victoria
-CSIRAC, University of Melbourne
-Computation Library, CSIRAC Emulator
-CSIRAC's Music
May 10, 2008 12:00 PM Special Events
Exhibit Launch & Open House: Charles Babbage's Difference Engine No. 2
Join the Computer History Museum in launching its exciting new exhibit: Babbage’s Difference Engine No. 2, exhibited for the first time in North America. Bring your family and friends to see and hear the Engine in action!

This five-ton Engine is one of only two Charles Babbage’s computing engines ever built, consisting of 8,000 parts of bronze, cast iron and steel and measuring 11 feet long and 7 feet high. It was designed to calculate and print mathematical tables. Come to see the docents “crank” the Engine and watch it mechanically calculate - an arresting spectacle of automatic computing.

The exhibit launch and open house, a Victorian-themed event, promises a stunning display of Babbage’s elegant design and inspired engineering. His designs for vast mechanical calculating engines rank as one of the startling achievements of the 19th century.

The Babbage Exhibit is made possible through the generosity of the following donors: Nathan Myhrvold, Andreas Bechtolsheim, Bell Family Trust, Donna Dubinsky & Len Shustek, Judy Estrin, Fry’s Electronics - Kathryn Kolder, Dorrit & F. Grant Saviers, Marva & John Warnock, and special thanks to Science Museum, London.

Come to see what no Victorian ever saw.
Join the Computer History Museum in launching its exciting new exhibit: Babbage’s Difference Engine No. 2, exhibited for the first time in North America. Bring your family and friends to see and hear the Engine in action!

This five-ton Engine is one of only two Charles Babbage’s computing engines ever built, consisting of 8,000 parts of bronze, cast iron and steel and measuring 11 feet long and 7 feet high. It was designed to calculate and print mathematical tables. Come to see the docents “crank” the Engine and watch it mechanically calculate - an arresting spectacle of automatic computing.

The exhibit launch and open house, a Victorian-themed event, promises a stunning display of Babbage’s elegant design and inspired engineering. His designs for vast mechanical calculating engines rank as one of the startling achievements of the 19th century.

The Babbage Exhibit is made possible through the generosity of the following donors: Nathan Myhrvold, Andreas Bechtolsheim, Bell Family Trust, Donna Dubinsky & Len Shustek, Judy Estrin, Fry’s Electronics - Kathryn Kolder, Dorrit & F. Grant Saviers, Marva & John Warnock, and special thanks to Science Museum, London.

Come to see what no Victorian ever saw.
May 1, 2008 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Computer History Museum Presents
An Evening with Nathan Myhrvold and Doron Swade: Discussing Charles Babbage’s Difference Engine
Take advantage of this unprecedented opportunity to see and hear a brand new Charles Babbage Difference Engine in action. Join us in discussion with Nathan Myhrvold, who commissioned the building of this engine, and Doron Swade, who completed the first Babbage Engine in 2002 from Babbage's original plans.

Exhibited for the first time in North America, this Babbage Difference Engine No. 2, the second of only two ever built, is a stunning display of Victorian mechanics and an arresting spectacle of automatic computing. The Engine consists of 8,000 parts of bronze, cast iron and steel, weighs five tons and measures eleven feet long and seven feet high.

Charles Babbage (1791-1871) is known as the visionary innovator whose designs for his vast mechanical calculating engines rank as one of the startling achievements of the 19th century. Babbage’s Difference Engine No. 2, designed in the 1840’s, but never built, is monumental in logical conception, physical size, and intricacy.

Join Myhrvold and Swade as they discuss Charles Babbage, the importance of his work, and why they are passionate about bringing this startling display of elegant design and inspired engineering to the world.

The Babbage Exhibit is made possible through the generosity of the following donors: Nathan Myhrvold, Andreas Bechtolsheim, Bell Family Trust, Donna Dubinsky & Len Shustek, Judy Estrin, Fry’s Electronics - Kathryn Kolder, Dorrit & F. Grant Saviers, Marva & John Warnock, and special thanks to Science Museum, London.
Take advantage of this unprecedented opportunity to see and hear a brand new Charles Babbage Difference Engine in action. Join us in discussion with Nathan Myhrvold, who commissioned the building of this engine, and Doron Swade, who completed the first Babbage Engine in 2002 from Babbage's original plans.

Exhibited for the first time in North America, this Babbage Difference Engine No. 2, the second of only two ever built, is a stunning display of Victorian mechanics and an arresting spectacle of automatic computing. The Engine consists of 8,000 parts of bronze, cast iron and steel, weighs five tons and measures eleven feet long and seven feet high.

Charles Babbage (1791-1871) is known as the visionary innovator whose designs for his vast mechanical calculating engines rank as one of the startling achievements of the 19th century. Babbage’s Difference Engine No. 2, designed in the 1840’s, but never built, is monumental in logical conception, physical size, and intricacy.

Join Myhrvold and Swade as they discuss Charles Babbage, the importance of his work, and why they are passionate about bringing this startling display of elegant design and inspired engineering to the world.

The Babbage Exhibit is made possible through the generosity of the following donors: Nathan Myhrvold, Andreas Bechtolsheim, Bell Family Trust, Donna Dubinsky & Len Shustek, Judy Estrin, Fry’s Electronics - Kathryn Kolder, Dorrit & F. Grant Saviers, Marva & John Warnock, and special thanks to Science Museum, London.
Apr 30, 2008 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Computer History Museum Presents
An Evening with Jim Morgan, Chairman of the Board, Applied Materials, in conversation with G. Dan Hutcheson, CEO, VLSI Research
...
Mar 18, 2008 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Computer History Museum Presents
An Evening with John Hennessy, in conversation with Paul Saffo
...
Feb 7, 2008 5:30 PM Speaker Series
Computer History Museum Presents
Dr. Charles Simonyi Presents Space Tourist
Almost 50 years ago, many countries competed in technology innovation – specifically, The Race to the Moon was a competition between the Soviets and Americans that the entire world watched. As the Cold War diminished, technology competition lessened and an era of cooperation materialized, and as early as 1975, scientific cooperation between the US and the Soviet Union was launched with the first cooperative human space flight.

From the competitive to cooperative – Now, the age of space exploration has advanced to a point where private citizens can travel to space. Using proven equipment and working side-by-side with professional astronauts and cosmonauts from a variety of countries, this new era is defining “outer space” as a new tourist destination.

Between April 7 and April 21, 2007, Dr. Charles Simonyi successfully completed his 14-day mission to the International Space Station. Convinced that humans will one day travel and live in space, Dr. Simonyi traveled with the hope of advancing civilian space flight, assisting space station research, and involving the world’s youth in the science of space travel.
Almost 50 years ago, many countries competed in technology innovation – specifically, The Race to the Moon was a competition between the Soviets and Americans that the entire world watched. As the Cold War diminished, technology competition lessened and an era of cooperation materialized, and as early as 1975, scientific cooperation between the US and the Soviet Union was launched with the first cooperative human space flight.

From the competitive to cooperative – Now, the age of space exploration has advanced to a point where private citizens can travel to space. Using proven equipment and working side-by-side with professional astronauts and cosmonauts from a variety of countries, this new era is defining “outer space” as a new tourist destination.

Between April 7 and April 21, 2007, Dr. Charles Simonyi successfully completed his 14-day mission to the International Space Station. Convinced that humans will one day travel and live in space, Dr. Simonyi traveled with the hope of advancing civilian space flight, assisting space station research, and involving the world’s youth in the science of space travel.
Jan 23, 2008 6:15 PM Speaker Series
Computer History Museum Presents
Digital Crossroads: It's Easy Being Green
"Greening" your life doesn't have to mean spending a fortune on solar panels or fuel-efficient cars. There are hundreds of easy and inexpensive ways to reduce your carbon footprint, help save natural resources, reduce pollution, protect wildlife and benefit our community. From providing tips on eco-friendly household products to detailing the benefits of recycling, our panel of experts will share ways you can make conscious...
"Greening" your life doesn't have to mean spending a fortune on solar panels or fuel-efficient cars. There are hundreds of easy and inexpensive ways to reduce your carbon footprint, help save natural resources, reduce pollution, protect wildlife and benefit our community. From providing tips on eco-friendly household products to detailing the benefits of recycling, our panel of experts will share ways you can make conscious decisions in our homes, in our cars and in our gardens that will help our planet. Part of Digital Crossroads: How Technology Meets our Daily Lives. CO-HOSTED BY The Commonwealth Club of California
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2007 Events

Dec 10, 2007 4:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Impact of the Commodore 64: A 25th Anniversary Celebration
Join us for a well-deserved celebration of this historic demonstration that spawned a tremendous market for home, small business, distributed and networked technology uses. These technology advances provided a foundation for many companies and technologies driving the Internet, wireless, social networking and other innovative technologies underway.
The Commodore 64 was an 8-bit home computer released by Commodore International in August, 1982, and during it’s lifetime (between 1982 and 1994), sales totaled close to 17 million units, making it the best-selling single personal computer model of all time. Approximately 10,000 commercial software titles were developed for the Commodore 64 including development tools, office applications, and games.

The C64 made an impressive debut at the 1982 Winter Consumer Electronics Show, as recalled by Production Engineer David A. Ziembicki: All we saw at our booth were Atari people with their mouths dropping open, saying, 'How can you do that for $595?'

The term personal computer was a common term in the early 80’s and was used as early as 1972 to characterize Xerox PARC's Alto. During this era of microcomputer innovation, the market was dominated by the IBM Personal Computer (IBM PC), the Commodore 64, the Atari 8-bit family, the Apple II, Tandy Corporation's TRS-80s, and various CP/M machines.

Although the history of the Commodore is rich, the histories of the people and the companies that developed these early personal computers are also critical to the personal productivity tools and business solutions we often take for granted in our daily lives.

Join us for a well-deserved celebration of this historic demonstration that spawned a tremendous market for home, small business, distributed and networked technology uses. These technology advances provided a foundation for many companies and technologies driving the Internet, wireless, social networking and other innovative technologies underway.

We thank our panelists in advance for providing recollections and perspectives from their early experiences and welcome their stories from a time that produced the foundation of our current technological society.
Nov 7, 2007 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Computer History Museum and Web History Center Present
Major Internet Milestones: A 30th Anniversary Celebration of the First Three-network Transmission
Please join us for a panel presentiion with recollections and perspectives from Vint Cerf, Robert Kahn, Don Nielson and other key pioneers and luminaries involved.
A major internet milestone occured on November 22, 1977. On this date the first known three-network transmission took place among SRI International, Menlo Park and the University of Southern California via London, England. The networks involved were the ARPANET, the Bay Area packet radio network, and the Atlantic packet satellite network.

This inter-network transmission among three dissimlar networks is generally regarded as the first true Internet connection. It was also a major milestone in packet radio, the technology behind WiFi and other kinds of wireless internet access.

On November 7, 2007, the Computer History Musuem and co-host the Web History Center will present a special celebration of this historic demonstration that spawned the Internet we know and use today.

Please join us for a panel presentiion with recollections and perspectives from Vint Cerf, Robert Kahn, Don Nielson and other key pioneers and luminaries involved.

The SRI van from which the packet radio transmission occured will be open for tours from 5:30-7 pm.
Oct 17, 2007 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with Morris Chang in conversation with Jen-Hsun Huang
Please join us for a rare and fascinating conversation with one of the most innovative semiconductor pioneers and esteemed business leaders of our time.
Please join us for a rare and fascinating conversation with one of the most innovative semiconductor pioneers and esteemed business leaders of our time.

Born in Ningbo (Zhejiang province), China, in 1931, Dr. Morris Chang is the founding chairman of the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd. (TSMC), a revolutionary enterprise he founded in 1987.

TSMC is a dedicated silicon foundry, an independent factory available to anyone for producing integrated circuits. Using this approach, both entrepreneurs and established semiconductor companies could avoid having to build their own semiconductor factories and focus instead on circuit features and system-level product design as the source of value.

From 1958 to 1983, Chang worked at Texas Instruments (TI), rising to group vice president for its worldwide semiconductor business. Under Chang's leadership, TI emerged as the world's leading producer of integrated circuits. During his tenure the company also pioneered high-volume production of consumer products including calculators, digital watches, and the popular “Speak & Spell” electronic toy.

In 1983, Chang left TI to become president and chief operating officer at General Instrument Corporation. After a year at General Instrument, Chang was recruited by the Taiwanese government to spearhead that country's industrial research organization, the Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI). While there, he focused on issues relating to using technology to advance Taiwan's larger social and economic goals. It was in this capacity that Chang founded TSMC.

In 1998, Chang was named by Business Week magazine as one of the Top 25 Managers of the Year and one of the Stars of Asia. In 2000, he received the IEEE Robert N. Noyce Award for exceptional contributions to the microelectronics industry. In 2005, he won the Nikkei Asia Prize for Regional Growth. On October 16, 2007, Chang will be inducted as a Fellow of the Computer History Museum.

Chang is a Life Member Emeritus of MIT Corporation, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, and serves on the advisory boards of the New York Stock Exchange, Stanford University, and the University of California at Berkeley.

Chang holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from M.I.T. (1952, 1953), and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University (1964). He also holds honorary doctorates from seven universities.

He will speak in conversation with Jen-Hsun Huang, co-founder, president and CEO of NVIDIA Corporation.
Jun 4, 2007 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with Former Apple Industrial Designers Robert Brunner and Jerry Manock, with moderator Bill Moggridge
The evening will include a photograph exhibit and book-signing of Core Memory: A Visual Survey of Vintage Computers Featuring Machines from the Computer History Museum with photographer Mark Richards and author John Alderman, published by Chronicle Books.
Apple Computer has long been noted for its industrial design prowess and ability to generate public interest with each new offering. Don't miss this unique opportunity to hear fascinating personal stories and perspectives of what it was like to be an industrial designer at Apple. Meet Jerry Manock, designer of the Apple II, Apple III and the original Mac, and Robert Brunner, head of Apple’s newly-formed Industrial Design Group (IDg) in 1990 that produced the PowerBook, Color Classic, and LC 520. Moderated by noted industrial designer and IDEO co-founder Bill Moggridge.

The evening will include a photograph exhibit and book-signing of Core Memory: A Visual Survey of Vintage Computers Featuring Machines from the Computer History Museum with photographer Mark Richards and author John Alderman, published by Chronicle Books.

BACKGROUND
The Computer History Museum Presents Speaker Series is an exclusive platform for open, passionate discussions for presenting the computing revolution and its impact on the human experience. These landmark presentations and panel discussions present inside stories and personal insights of top information age leaders from industry, government and academia, and assist the Museum in bringing computing history to life.
May 15, 2007 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with Gideon Gartner, in conversation with Neill Brownstein
For 30 years, IT industry analysts have held sway as global intermediaries between technologists and media, governments, universities and investors. Yet, they are also fundamentally tethered to the evolution of technology. Join us as we present industry analyst marketplace pioneer Gideon Gartner, in conversation with venture capitalist Neill Brownstein, for an evening of candid and personal insights on the rise of IT industry analysts.
For 30 years, IT industry analysts have held sway as global intermediaries between technologists and media, governments, universities and investors. Yet, they are also fundamentally tethered to the evolution of technology. Join us as we present industry analyst marketplace pioneer Gideon Gartner, in conversation with venture capitalist Neill Brownstein, for an evening of candid and personal insights on the rise of IT industry analysts.

BACKGROUND
The Computer History Museum Presents Speaker Series is an exclusive platform for open, passionate discussions for presenting the computing revolution and its impact on the human experience. These landmark presentations and panel discussions present inside stories and personal insights of top information age leaders from industry, government and academia, and assist the Museum in bringing computing history to life.
May 1, 2007 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with Legendary Venture Capitalist Arthur Rock in Conversation with John Markoff
A 1951 graduate of Harvard Business School, Arthur Rock began his career as a security analyst in New York City before joining the corporate finance department of Hayden, Stone & Co. In 1957 he worked with Alfred “Bud” Coyle to raise financing from Sherman Fairchild to found Fairchild Semiconductor, the company that established Silicon Valley as a world center of innovation in integrated circuit technology.
A 1951 graduate of Harvard Business School, Arthur Rock began his career as a security analyst in New York City before joining the corporate finance department of Hayden, Stone & Co. In 1957 he worked with Alfred “Bud” Coyle to raise financing from Sherman Fairchild to found Fairchild Semiconductor, the company that established Silicon Valley as a world center of innovation in integrated circuit technology.

Mr. Rock moved to California in 1961 and formed a partnership with Tommy Davis. Together they invested $3 million and returned $100 million to their investors. After establishing his own firm, Arthur Rock & Co in 1968, he worked with Fairchild co-founders Gordon Moore and Robert Noyce to launch Intel Corporation, the largest, and by many measures, the most successful semiconductor company in the world today. He notes that “It was one of the few times that I helped start a company that I absolutely knew in my own mind was going to be a big success. I raised the money just on the telephone in something like two days.”

Arthur Rock served as Intel’s first Chairman of the Board and Chairman of the Executive Committee. Based on this experience he has proclaimed Rock’s Law, a corollary to Moore’s Law, which says that “the cost of capital equipment to build semiconductors will double every four years.”

Mr. Rock also invested in and held early stage board positions at pioneering scientific computing company, Scientific Data Systems; at Teledyne, which grew into one of the most successful technology conglomerates in the history of American business, and at Apple Computer. He has contributed to the local community by supporting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the San Francisco Opera, and the California Institute of Technology. In 2003 he donated $25 Million to establish the Arthur Rock Center for Entrepreneurship at Harvard Business School. Professor of Business Administration Howard H. Stevenson says “Arthur Rock is part of the history of American business and entrepreneurship.
Apr 29, 2007 4:00 PM Speaker Series
CCRMA & Computer History Museum Present
A Celebration of Max Mathews and 50 Years of Computer Music
A Celebration of Max Mathews and 50 Years of Computer Music
Join us in honoring Max for an afternoon of sound, celebration and discovery of his ideas, works, music, and writings.
Fifty years ago, in 1957, at Bell Telephone Laboratories, Max Mathews demonstrated that the digital computer can be used as a fantastic new music instrument. He created a revolutionary software platform destined to form the basis of all contemporary digital musical systems.

His audacious ideas were driven by the belief that any sound that the human ear can hear can be produced by a computer. Mathews' mastery of this new instrument revealed new musical horizons and sparked a burgeoning curiosity into the very nature of sound. His comprehension and elaboration made five decades of art and research possible, laying the groundwork for generations of electronic musicians to synthesize, record, and play music.

Today at Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) as a Professor Emeritus he continues not only to educate students and colleagues, but also to guide and inspire with his constant inventiveness and pure musical pleasure.

Join us in honoring Max for an afternoon of sound, celebration and discovery of his ideas, works, music, and writings.
Mar 29, 2007 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Great Principles of Computing
Great Principles of Computing
Computing is no longer a science of the artificial. It is a science of natural information processes. The remarkable shift to this realization occurred only in the last decade.
Computing is no longer a science of the artificial. It is a science of natural information processes. The remarkable shift to this realization occurred only in the last decade.

Computing is mature enough to be described in terms of its fundamental principles. The principles reveal computing's deep structure and how it applies in many fields. They reveal common aspects of technology and create opportunities for innovation. They open entirely new ways to stimulate the excitement and curiosity of young people about the world of computing.

In the 1940s, computation was seen as a tool for solving equations, cracking codes, analyzing data, and managing business processes. By the 1980s, computation had advanced to become a new method in science, joining the traditional theory and experiment. During the 1990s, computation advanced even further as people in many fields discovered they were dealing with information processes buried in their deep structures -- for example, quantum waves in physics, DNA in biology, brain patterns in cognitive science, information flows in economic systems. Computation has entered everyday life with new ways to solve problems, new forms of art, music, motion pictures, and commerce, new approaches to learning, and even new slang expressions.

Peter Denning will share his work on the great principles of computing. His taxonomy will help you understand
computing and how it works in your world. You will see what makes computing great and of lasting value.

In 1936, Alan Turing wrote that computation is unavoidable. He was right.
Jan 9, 2007 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with Robert Kahn in conversation with Ed Feigenbaum
Join us for a very personal evening with a true pioneer of the computing revolution.
Robert Kahn was inducted as a Computer History Museum Fellow on October 17, 2006, for his pioneering technical contributions to internetworking and for leadership in the application of networks to scientific research.

Kahn is Chairman, CEO and President of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI), which provides funding for research and development of the U.S. National Information Infrastructure.

Shortly after graduating from university, Kahn took a leave of absence from MIT where he was an Assistant Professor to join the research firm Bolt, Beranek and Newman (BBN). While there, he was responsible for the system design of the Arpanet, the first wide area packet-switched network. He was also a part of the BBN team developing the Interface Message Processor (IMP), a small computer that served as the Arpanet packet switch and standardized the network interface to all attached host computers.

In October 1972, he organized a demonstration of the Arpanet at the International Computer Communication Conference in Washington, D.C. He then moved to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and subsequently became Director of its Information Processing Techniques Office. Soon after arrival, he initiated the Internetting project to develop an open architecture for networking, ensuring that communications could occur in a network-independent manner.

While devising methods of ensuring reliable communications between such networks, he and Vint Cerf (CHM Fellow, 2000), developed the Internet architecture and basis for the TCP/IP protocol suite, first described publicly in May, 1974. Kahn later initiated the Strategic Computing Program, an effort to develop advanced hardware and software technologies.

Join us for a very personal evening with a true pioneer of the computing revolution.
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2006 Events

Nov 13, 2006 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Computer History Museum and Intel Museum Present
35th Anniversary of the Intel® 4004 Microprocessor
35th Anniversary of the Intel® 4004 Microprocessor
The Computer History Museum and the Intel Museum invite you to mark the 35th anniversary of one of the most important products in technology history. Introduced in November 1971, the Intel® 4004 microprocessor was an early and significant commercial product to embody computer architecture within a silicon device. And it started an electronics revolution that changed our world.
The Computer History Museum and the Intel Museum invite you to mark the 35th anniversary of one of the most important products in technology history. Introduced in November 1971, the Intel® 4004 microprocessor was an early and significant commercial product to embody computer architecture within a silicon device. And it started an electronics revolution that changed our world.

There were no customer-programmable microprocessors on the market before the 4004. It was the first and it was the enabling technology that propelled software into the limelight as a key player in the world of digital electronics design. Intel, which had been making memory chips, used the 4004 as a technical and marketing launch pad to develop an expertise in microprocessors that, in quick time, made it a market leader.

This strategy allowed it to emerge as the most influential designer and producer of microprocessors—the engine of the information age—for over three decades.

In celebration of this milestone anniversary and the November 15, 2006 opening of Intel Museum’s new exhibit entitled, “The Intel 4004 Microprocessor ,” Intel 4004 designers Ted Hoff and Federico Faggin take center stage with an historical perspective on the evolution of the 4004, from a special-order from Japanese calculator manufacturer Busicom, to a mass-produced device.

Additionally, Tim McNerney, who assembled and led a talented team of engineers and designers to create the Intel 4004 35th anniversary exhibit with the Intel Museum and the Intel Corporate Archives, will be invited to speak at the conclusion of the panel. He will address the process of reverse-engineering of the Intel 4004 schematics and the Busicom141-PF calculator ROMs that led his team to uncover elegantly crafted layers of a computational system that makes optimal use of hardware and software. This special anniversary program will be moderated by industry veteran and Intel alum, Dave House.

More information on the 4004 can be found at
http://www.intel.com/museum/archives/4004.htm
Nov 6, 2006 5:30 PM Special Events
A Gathering of Our Friends and Supporters
Sixty Years of SRI's World-Changing Innovations
Join SRI International President and CEO Dr. Curtis Carlson and a panel of SRI luminaries moderated by Paul Saffo.
Join SRI International President and CEO Dr. Curtis Carlson and a panel of SRI luminaries moderated by Paul Saffo.
Nov 2, 2006 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Crucial Crossroads: Technology X Retailing
A unique opportunity for technology consumers, retailers and fans to hear colorful and authentic behind-the-scenes stories and perspectives. You won’t want to miss it!
How did the migration from the niche retail outlet evolve to big box stores and the online experience as we know it today revolutionize the commercial computing industry at large? How did this dynamic change the face of distribution and what now lies ahead?

The Computer History Museum cordially invites you to a lively panel discussion titled, “Crucial Crossroads: Technology X Retailing,” featuring computer industry retail veterans Kathy Kolder, co-founder and executive vice president, Fry's Electronics; Seymour Merrin, founder of ComputerWorks (1978); Ellen Miller, acting executive vice president and chief marketing officer, CompUSA; and Steve Schiro, Microsoft corporate vice president, Home & Retail Division and vice president retail, Americas, Worldwide Retail Services & GTM’s along with moderator Keith Newman.

A unique opportunity for technology consumers, retailers and fans to hear colorful and authentic behind-the-scenes stories and perspectives. You won’t want to miss it!
Oct 26, 2006 6:00 PM Special Events
CHM Presents
Public-Key Cryptography (PKC)30th Anniversary Celebration
An event to honor the inventions, inventors, historical milestones and the future of Public-Key Cryptography.
An event to honor the inventions, inventors, historical milestones and the future of Public-Key Cryptography.
Sep 21, 2006 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
The Cray-1 Supercomputer: 30th Anniversary Event—Celebrating the Man and the Machine
Together with tonight's panel discussion, guests will get a glimpse of the early world of high performance computing they won't see anywhere else. The photography exhibit runs only until December so be sure to visit!
In 1976, Cray Research, Inc. delivered its first supercomputer to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, birthplace of the atomic bomb. The Cray-1, as it was known, was the fastest computer in the world and was a blend of Cray’s unique engineering style and an urgency for high performance computing borne of cold war competition between the United States and the Soviet Union.

For the next 30 years, Cray defined the limits of the possible for supercomputers by building the fastest machines in the world. In spite of the enormous influence on science and engineering of his machines, Seymour Cray himself worked in small groups in rural America and shunned publicity.

How could this one man and his hand-picked team of people build the fastest computers in the world? What does the Cray-1 tell us about the engineering, social and economic factors that coalesce into creating a stable technological artifact? Why did much larger computer companies abandon the field of supercomputing to this small but powerful foe? What, exactly, were these incredible machines used for?

These and other themes of the life and machines of Seymour Cray will be explored at the Computer History Museum in a panel lecture celebrating the Cray-1’s 30th anniversary. Panelists include: Bill Buzbee (Los Alamos, NCAR), Bo Ewald (Los Alamos, Cray) and Jack Worlton (Los Alamos). Burton Smith (Tera, Cray) will be the evening’s panel moderator.

A special gala photography exhibit of Cray Research by renowned American photographer Lee Friedlander will also be featured this night.

In 1975, as part of a special commission, American master photographer Lee Friedlander took these photographs at Cray Research, Inc., Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, birthplace of the Cray-1 supercomputer—then the fastest computer in the world.

The result was a landmark visual record documenting the assembly of this awe-inspiring machine and the people who made it. These photos formed part of a commemorative book given to Cray employees and a limited-edition set of photographs, part of which form this photo exhibit.

Together with tonight's panel discussion, guests will get a glimpse of the early world of high performance computing they won't see anywhere else. The photography exhibit runs only until December so be sure to visit!
Sep 12, 2006 5:30 PM Special Events
Hard Disk Drive 50th Anniversary Celebration
The Hard Drive Imprint : Past, Present and Future
An evening to chronicle 50 years of hard disk drive innovation and its impact on the fabric of society
An evening to chronicle 50 years of hard disk drive innovation and its impact on the fabric of society
Aug 17, 2006 6:00 PM Special Events
Volunteer Appreciation Day BBQ
Come join us on Friday, 8/17, at the Computer History Museum. We will enjoy good food, games, surprises and have a small awards program to say thank you to all the hard working and dedicated volunteers. All active volunteers and their immediate families are invited to join.
All ACTIVE volunteers and their families are invited to enjoy fun, food and games.

Casual attire!

Come join us on Friday, 8/17, at the Computer History Museum. We will enjoy good food, games, surprises and have a small awards program to say thank you to all the hard working and dedicated volunteers. All active volunteers and their immediate families are invited to join.
Jun 12, 2006 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with Robert Price: The Control Data Story in Conversation with Mel Stuckey
An Evening with Robert Price: The Control Data Story in Conversation with Mel Stuckey
Join Robert Price as he shares behind-the-scenes history and personal stories about Control Data's legacy of lasting lessons on innovation.
"Bob Price is the best person I know to tell the story of Control Data and to share its valuable lessons for posterity"
Founder, Control Data Corporation

Control Data's story is one of innovation harnessing the imagination, ingenuity and energy of its people to meet the technology needs of customers and the urgent needs of society. As chairman of the board and CEO, Robert Price was one of Control Data's veteran leaders who effectively blended business strategies with technological innovation.

Control Data's dream of becoming a supercomputer pioneer was born in 1957 during IBM's domination of the industry and at the peak of the Cold War. Yet, this startup computer company was so effective that in 1963, IBM's chairman said that he failed to understand why IBM had lost their leadership position with supercomputers to a company with 34 people, including the janitor.

Despite the turbulence in the social, political and economic environments of the late 1950s and 1960s, Control Data achieved a greatness few companies ever realize. It transformed those 34 employees into a company with 45,000 people around the world with revenues topping one billion dollars in less than 14 years from its start.

Join Robert Price as he shares behind-the-scenes history and personal stories about Control Data's legacy of lasting lessons on innovation.

There will be a book signing for Price's new book, The Eye for Innovation: Recognizing Possibilities and Managing the Creative Enterprise.
Jun 5, 2006 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Wireless Sensors: Inventing the Future
The possibilities for wireless sensors have excited scientists and
researchers, the business community, military and government
officials, and consumers alike for many years. The potential
applications for wireless sensors and transducers (sensors combined
with actuator mechanisms) are limited only by the imagination.
Sensing alone is not enough for many applications-the ability to act
on the sensory data is also required. Small, battery-powered
platforms capable of sensing and actuation are beginning to appear,
with increasingly compelling technology on board. Richard Newton,
D.K. Arvind, and Roger Meike are all heavily involved in the design,
production, programming and utilization/deployment of wireless
sensors. In a three-way discussion, they each will offer their own
perspectives and experience in this rapidly evolving technology arena.
The possibilities for wireless sensors have excited scientists and researchers, the business community, military and government
officials, and consumers alike for many years. The potential
applications for wireless sensors and transducers (sensors combined
with actuator mechanisms) are limited only by the imagination.
Sensing alone is not enough for many applications-the ability to act
on the sensory data is also required. Small, battery-powered
platforms capable of sensing and actuation are beginning to appear,
with increasingly compelling technology on board. Richard Newton,
D.K. Arvind, and Roger Meike are all heavily involved in the design,
production, programming and utilization/deployment of wireless
sensors. In a three-way discussion, they each will offer their own
perspectives and experience in this rapidly evolving technology arena.
May 24, 2006 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
The History of the Future of the City
As head of research at IBM in the 70s and at Hewlett Packard in the 80s, Joel Birnbaum played a seminal role in helping to conceive and lay the technical groundwork for pervasive computing; computing seamlessly incorporated into everyday life.

One of the prime sites for pervasive computing is the city: its buildings, its transportation systems, its services, and, of course, its residents.
As head of research at IBM in the 70s and at Hewlett Packard in the 80s, Joel Birnbaum played a seminal role in helping to conceive and lay the technical groundwork for pervasive computing; computing seamlessly incorporated into everyday life.

One of the prime sites for pervasive computing is the city: its buildings, its transportation systems, its services, and, of course, its residents.

Birnbaum will screen excerpts from some scarcely seen scenario videos about what might be termed the interactive city, based on pervasive computing, and discuss the four stages technology must pass through before it can be considered pervasive.

Steve Dietz is Director of the inaugural, biennial ZeroOne San Jose: A Global Festival of Art on the Edge, which will take place in San Jose August 7-13. One of the themes of the Festival is the “interactive city,” inspired to a great extent by Birnbaum¹s work. Dietz will discuss some of the 36 projects that will be presented on the streets of San Jose during the Festival.

Ben Hooker, a participating artist from London, will also present his project, DataNature, which was jointly commissioned by ZeroOne San Jose and the City of San Jose's Public Art program.
May 15, 2006 5:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
The Mouse That Roared: PDP-1 Celebration Event
Please join us for a unique bonus event: One of the Museum’s PDP-1 computers has just been painstakingly restored and will be demonstrated during the evening. A special commemorative gift--created by the PDP-1--will also be given to all attendees!
Introduced in 1959, the DEC PDP-1 computer is truly the mouse that roared, a powerful, easy-to-operate computer with a host of new abilities that allowed its users to interact with a computer all to themselves. This was a novelty in the early 1960s when mainframe-based batch processing was the norm and the idea of a computer dedicated to a single-user was heretical, akin to having a personal aircraft carrier.

Our panel comprises key figures in the development and use of the PDP-1. Moderated by computer science legend Dr. Ed Fredkin, panelists will explore the creation and impact of this unique machine and how most of its features, functionality and DEC's philosophy of interactive computing were eventually adopted by other companies years later.

Also, please join us for a unique bonus event: One of the Museum’s PDP-1 computers has just been painstakingly restored and will be demonstrated during the evening. A special commemorative gift--created by the PDP-1--will also be given to all attendees!
Apr 24, 2006 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
An Evening with Wiki Inventor Ward Cunningham in Conversation with John Gage
Join wiki inventor Ward Cunningham and Sun Microsystems' chief researcher and vice president of the Science Office, John Gage, for a thoughtful and spirited discussion about the socialization of creativity and the past, present and future views of models to support this trend.
Join wiki inventor Ward Cunningham and Sun Microsystems' chief researcher and vice president of the Science Office, John Gage, for a thoughtful and spirited discussion about the socialization of creativity and the past, present and future views of models to support this trend.
Mar 15, 2006 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
Pioneering the Laptop: Engineering the GRiD Compass
Join us as key members of the original GRiD engineering team – Glenn Edens, Carol Hankins, Craig Mathias and Dave Paulsen – share engineering stories from the Wild West of the laptop computer. Moderated by New York Times journalist John Markoff.
Introduced in 1982, the GRiD Compass 1100 was likely the first commercial computer created in a laptop format and one of the first truly portable machines. With its rugged magnesium clamshell case (the screen folds flat over the keyboard), switching power supply, electro-luminescent display, non-volatile bubble memory, and built-in modem, the hardware design incorporated many features that we take for granted today. Software innovations included a graphical operating system, an integrated productivity suite including word processor, spreadsheet, graphics and e-mail. GRiD Systems Corporation, founded in 1979 by John Ellenby and his co-founders Glenn Edens and David Paulsen, pioneered many portable devices including the laptop, pen-based and tablet PC form factors.

Join us as key members of the original GRiD engineering team – Glenn Edens, Carol Hankins, Craig Mathias and Dave Paulsen – share engineering stories from the Wild West of the laptop computer. Moderated by New York Times journalist John Markoff.
Feb 27, 2006 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
The Rise of Silicon Valley: From Shockley Labs to Fairchild Semiconductor
On February 13, 1956, co-inventor of the transistor William Shockley formally announced the establishment of Shockley Labs, Silicon Valley’s first semiconductor company. In their modest Quonset hut laboratory on San Antonio Avenue in Mountain View, Shockley’s hand-picked team of some of the nation’s brightest young scientists and engineers developed innovative technologies and ideas that forever changed the way we live, work and play. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of this pivotal event in the history of our region, join technology historian Michael Riordan in a conversation between early Shockley employees and associates Jim Gibbons, Jay Last, Hans Queisser, and Harry Sello.
On February 13, 1956, co-inventor of the transistor William Shockley formally announced the establishment of Shockley Labs, Silicon Valley’s first semiconductor company. In their modest Quonset hut laboratory on San Antonio Avenue in Mountain View, Shockley’s hand-picked team of some of the nation’s brightest young scientists and engineers developed innovative technologies and ideas that forever changed the way we live, work and play. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of this pivotal event in the history of our region, join technology historian Michael Riordan in a conversation between early Shockley employees and associates Jim Gibbons, Jay Last, Hans Queisser, and Harry Sello.
Feb 14, 2006 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
Social Computing: From Message Boards to Blogs & Beyond
Bring your honey, bring a friend or come solo to the Computer History Museum on Valentine's Day. Join Usenet guru Erik Fair, virtual worlds pioneer and Yahoo! Community Strategist Randy Farmer, LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman, and Six Apart co-founder Mena Trott, together with top Wall Street Journal columnist Kara Swisher, to hear fascinating personal stories and perspectives about social computing: yesterday, today and tomorrow. Valentine's Day surprises will abound.
Bring your honey, bring a friend or come solo to the Computer History Museum on Valentine's Day. Join Usenet guru Erik Fair, virtual worlds pioneer and Yahoo! Community Strategist Randy Farmer, LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman, and Six Apart co-founder Mena Trott, together with top Wall Street Journal columnist Kara Swisher, to hear fascinating personal stories and perspectives about social computing: yesterday, today and tomorrow. Valentine's Day surprises will abound.
Jan 18, 2006 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
An Evening with Michael Ruettgers in conversation with Mark Veverka, Barron's
Mike Ruettgers is retired chairman of the board and special advisor to EMC Corporation, the world leader in products, services and solutions for information management and storage. A frequent speaker at influential venues around the world, including the World Economic Forum and major IT industry conferences, Ruettgers joined EMC in 1988 and served as CEO from 1992 until 2001. Ruettgers has been named one of the World's Top 25 Executives by BusinessWeek; one of the Best CEOs in America by Worth magazine; one of the 25 Most Powerful People in Networking in 2000 by Network World; and CEO of the Year for 2000 by Massachusetts Investor's Digest. Please join us as this extraordinary leader and visionary shares personal stories from his multi-decade odyssey in the high-tech industry.
Mike Ruettgers is retired chairman of the board and special advisor to EMC Corporation, the world leader in products, services and solutions for information management and storage. A frequent speaker at influential venues around the world, including the World Economic Forum and major IT industry conferences, Ruettgers joined EMC in 1988 and served as CEO from 1992 until 2001. Ruettgers has been named one of the World's Top 25 Executives by BusinessWeek; one of the Best CEOs in America by Worth magazine; one of the 25 Most Powerful People in Networking in 2000 by Network World; and CEO of the Year for 2000 by Massachusetts Investor's Digest. Please join us as this extraordinary leader and visionary shares personal stories from his multi-decade odyssey in the high-tech industry.
Jan 11, 2006 5:30 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
Sun Founders Panel
Please join us for this very special event at the Computer History Museum.
Scott McNealy, Andy Bechtolsheim, Bill Joy and Vinod Khosla, with moderator John Gage share their personal stories of the early days at Sun.

When Xerox PARC loaned the Stanford Engineering Department an entire Alto Ethernet network with a laser printer, then-graduate student Andy Bechtolsheim redesigned it into a prototype and attached it to Stanford University’s computer network. Sun Microsystems grew out of this prototype, and the company’s name came from the acronym for Stanford University Network (SUN).

The company was incorporated in 1982 by three 26-year-old Stanford
alumni: Bechtolsheim, Vinod Khosla and Scott McNealy. The trio soon attracted UC Berkeley UNIX guru, Bill Joy, who led software development for the new company. By its second birthday, Sun had grown to more than 400 employees and annual sales of million. Today, 22 years later, Sun employs more than 35,000 and has revenues of over billion.

Please join us for this very special event at the Computer History Museum.
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2005 Events

Dec 7, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
An Evening with Paul Baran, in conversation with Henry Lowood
Baran will discuss the origin and development of his accomplishments—which span a lifetime of entrepreneurial activity, including 150 papers, 40 patents, and five start-up companies—and how these continue to have an impact on our everyday lives.
Baran, who received a 2005 Computer History Museum Fellow Award for his foundational work on packet switching, is joined on stage by Henry Lowood, Curator for History of Science and Technology Collections, Stanford University Libraries.

Baran will discuss the origin and development of his accomplishments—which span a lifetime of entrepreneurial activity, including 150 papers, 40 patents, and five start-up companies—and how these continue to have an impact on our everyday lives.

BACKGROUND
Odysseys in Technology, The Computer History Museum Speaker Series Sponsored by Sun Microsystems Laboratories, presents people and perspectives behind extraordinary innovations and advancements in the computer technology-related world. Each event in the Series provides stimulating interaction with authentic experts whose achievements have transformed how things are done or viewed, and to examine how their personal stories might inform the present and future. These programs occasionally feature technologies or point events, with the objective to apply lessons of history to present day understanding and inspiration.
Nov 7, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
The Origins of Zelenograd: The Amazing Story Of Two U.S. Engineers In Cold War Russia
Author and BioCentury Publications Senior Editor Steve Usdin tells the fascinating story of two American engineers, Joel Barr and Alfred Sarant, who were recruited into espionage by Julius Rosenberg, and, driven by ideology, evaded the FBI and escaped to carry on their work on behalf of the Soviet state. Barr and Sarant rose to the pinnacle of power in the Soviet establishment and managed the building of the postwar modern Soviet military machine and microelectronics industry. Based on new files and a personal friendship with the late Barr, who gave Usdin interviews and letters revealing his entire life story, Usdin shares new stories on computing during the Cold War and how Zelenograd, the Soviet Silicon Valley came to be.

Usdin is joined by Alexander Galitsky, former Soviet Space Agency president and general manager, to discuss other aspects of how the high tech industry began in the former Soviet Union and how it continues to evolve today.
Author and BioCentury Publications Senior Editor Steve Usdin tells the fascinating story of two American engineers, Joel Barr and Alfred Sarant, who were recruited into espionage by Julius Rosenberg, and, driven by ideology, evaded the FBI and escaped to carry on their work on behalf of the Soviet state. Barr and Sarant rose to the pinnacle of power in the Soviet establishment and managed the building of the postwar modern Soviet military machine and microelectronics industry. Based on new files and a personal friendship with the late Barr, who gave Usdin interviews and letters revealing his entire life story, Usdin shares new stories on computing during the Cold War and how Zelenograd, the Soviet Silicon Valley came to be.

Usdin is joined by Alexander Galitsky, former Soviet Space Agency president and general manager, to discuss other aspects of how the high tech industry began in the former Soviet Union and how it continues to evolve today.
Oct 20, 2005 5:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
A Public Discussion on the National Science Foundation's Large-Scale Computing Research Efforts for the Future
This gathering, programmed by the NSF’s Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering Advisory Committee, will feature an open session of research projects of interest to NSF, the advisory committee and the public. NSF has historically supported seminal computing research in small projects. Since the beginning of the its IT Research Program in 2000, the Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering Directorate of the NSF has funded a number of larger scale efforts that are already having major impact. Presentations will highlight work on optical-network based computing, sensor networks, and cyber security and privacy. The presentations will focus on outlining both the fundamental research results and some of the possible applications and extensions that will be of interest to industry.
This gathering, programmed by the NSF’s Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering Advisory Committee, will feature an open session of research projects of interest to NSF, the advisory committee and the public. NSF has historically supported seminal computing research in small projects. Since the beginning of the its IT Research Program in 2000, the Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering Directorate of the NSF has funded a number of larger scale efforts that are already having major impact. Presentations will highlight work on optical-network based computing, sensor networks, and cyber security and privacy. The presentations will focus on outlining both the fundamental research results and some of the possible applications and extensions that will be of interest to industry.

Members of the NSF's Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering Advisory Committee who are expected to be in attendance include: Dr. Alfred V. Aho, Columbia University; Annie Anton, Professor, Purdue University; Randy Bryant, Professor, Carnegie Mellon University; Dr. Vint Cerf, Google; Dr. Peter Chen, Louisiana State University; William J. Dally, Professor, Stanford University; Deborah Estrin, Professor, UCLA; David J. Farber, Professor, Carnegie Mellon University; Dwight A. Gourneau, Professor, NAMTech, Inc.; Barbara J. Grosz, Professor, Harvard University; Marti Hearst, Professor, University of California-Berkeley; Elizabeth R. Jessup, Professor, University of Colorado; John L. King, Professor, University of Michigan; Dr. Maria M. Klawe, Princeton University; Dr. Daniel T. Ling, Microsoft Research; Dr. Antonio Lopez, Xavier University - New Orleans; Joseph O'Rourke, Professor, Smith College; Rosalind W. Picard, Professor, MIT Media Lab; Mr. Patrick Scaglia, Professor, HP Laboratories; Fred B. Schneider, Professor, Cornell University; Marc Snir, Professor, Head of Department of Computer Science; Dr. Alfred Z. Spector, IBM Research Division; Dr. David Tennenhouse, Research Intel Corporation; Dr. Telle Whitney, Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology; Margaret Wright, Professor, New York University; Bryant W. York, Professor, Portland State University and Ellen Zegura, Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology.
Oct 19, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
Research and Fun
One who seeks to manage research must, like a good coach, create something more than the sum of the players. Good research management seeks the reverberation of ideas that produces results. Good research management builds pride in the environment, pride in the support and understanding researchers feel, and pride in the team. Remember that research is a human endeavor fraught with technical and emotional risks and frustrations. Reduce drudgery, stamp out frustration, encourage spirit, provide support, and recognize achievement to get both loyalty and results.
I find fun and research inexorably intertwined. Research is fun! Like a team sport, the hunt for new knowledge brings purpose, comradeship, conversation, competition, and appreciation. Finding new knowledge brings the joys of novelty, beauty, simplicity, understanding, and sometimes even utility. Just as team spirit wins games, so team spirit speeds research. Team spirit lets us risk exposing our half-baked fledgling ideas so others can carry them further; team spirit lets ideas reverberate between people, growing better with each passs.

Remembering that research is fun offers strategies for both researchers and managers. One who seeks to do good research must play in a field he likes, with trusted colleagues and friends. Seek what you like to do in a place you like and with people you like and respect.

One who seeks to manage research must, like a good coach, create something more than the sum of the players. Good research management seeks the reverberation of ideas that produces results. Good research management builds pride in the environment, pride in the support and understanding researchers feel, and pride in the team. Remember that research is a human endeavor fraught with technical and emotional risks and frustrations. Reduce drudgery, stamp out frustration, encourage spirit, provide support, and recognize achievement to get both loyalty and results.
Sep 29, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
The 40th Anniversary of Moore's Law with Gordon Moore, Co-founder and Chairman Emeritus, Intel, in conversation with Carver Mead, Chairman and Founder, Foveon
This year marks the 40th anniversary of Moore’s Law, Gordon E. Moore's 1965 observation and prediction about the exponential growth in the power of semiconductor technology. Moore observed that semiconductor technology had doubled in power every year and predicted that it would continue along this developmental path. Originally named Moore's Law several years later by the physicist Carver Mead, that simple observation has proven to be the bulwark of the world's most remarkable industry. In 1975, Moore updated this to a doubling about every two years. History has thus far proven Moore's law correct, and this special conversation between Moore and Mead looks back on the past 40 years on what has made this electronics revolution possible.
This year marks the 40th anniversary of Moore’s Law, Gordon E. Moore's 1965 observation and prediction about the exponential growth in the power of semiconductor technology. Moore observed that semiconductor technology had doubled in power every year and predicted that it would continue along this developmental path. Originally named Moore's Law several years later by the physicist Carver Mead, that simple observation has proven to be the bulwark of the world's most remarkable industry. In 1975, Moore updated this to a doubling about every two years. History has thus far proven Moore's law correct, and this special conversation between Moore and Mead looks back on the past 40 years on what has made this electronics revolution possible.
Sep 13, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
An Evening with Carol Bartz
Please join us for the Computer History Museum’s ongoing “Odysseys in Technology” series featuring Carol Bartz, Chairman, CEO, and President of Autodesk, Inc. in conversation with veteran Silicon Valley author and journalist Michael Malone.
Please join us for the Computer History Museum’s ongoing “Odysseys in Technology” series featuring Carol Bartz, Chairman, CEO, and President of Autodesk, Inc. in conversation with veteran Silicon Valley author and journalist Michael Malone.

In this wide-ranging exchange, Bartz and Malone will discuss her journey from a small farm town in Wisconsin to the pinnacle of success in high-tech, and the challenges of being a woman executive. This will be a lively evening. Carol is known as a dynamic, entertaining straight-talker with a real passion for life.

Bartz was previously interviewed by Malone for his PBS series, “The Entrepreneurs.”
Sep 10, 2005 1:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
MASTERING THE GAME: A HISTORY OF COMPUTER CHESS NEW EXHIBIT DEBUT AND OPEN HOUSE
On September 10, the Computer History Museum will debut its newest physical and online exhibit, Mastering The Game: A History of Computer Chess.
On September 10, the Computer History Museum will debut its newest physical and online exhibit, Mastering The Game: A History of Computer Chess. This marks the first new exhibit development since the institution relocated to its new home three years ago. Designed to appeal to a wide range of visitors, and created with the guidance of the world’s top thinkers in the fields of artificial intelligence, computer design and chess, this flagship exhibit, will examine the drama behind the game considered by many to be the ultimate test of human intellect. The 1,000 square foot exhibit will follow a chronological plan, from the theoretical foundations developed by such computing pioneers as Alan Turing and Claude Shannon, to the development of PC chess software and the drama of IBM’s chess-playing supercomputer, Deep Blue. Visitors will explore the multi-layered history of computer chess, listen to chess software pioneers, learn the basics of chess algorithms and experience the sights and sounds of the era through vintage footage. In addition, a freestanding computer learning station will allow visitors to explore software concepts, such as the basic ideas that lie beneath all chess software programs. To satisfy the Computer History Museum’s global audience, the institution has also built an online version of Mastering the Game: A History of Computer Chess. Not only will this online counterpart provide access to information made available in the physical exhibit, it will contain additional content. The online version of Mastering the Game will include access to original source materials, relevant links to complementary organizations and allow visitors to share their computer chess stories. The Museum gratefully acknowledges ACM, Hilton Garden Inn Mountain View, Ropes & Gray and Target for
their sponsorships associated with this exhibit
Sep 8, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
The History of Computer Chess: An AI Perspective
This panel, comprising seminal contributors to the solution of this challenge—including two of AI’s leading pioneers—will discuss these and other questions as well as the origin and development of computer chess and what it tells us about ourselves and the machines we build.
Playing chess by computer began in the early 1950s, nearly as soon as computers became available. As a human activity, chess is believed to require ‘thinking,’ yet in 1997 a massively-parallel supercomputer, drawing on over four decades of continual advances in both hardware and software, defeated the best human player in the world.

Does playing chess require thinking? Or is human thinking perhaps a form of calculation, parts of which a computer can mimic? What is the tradeoff between ‘knowledge’ and ‘search?’ Was Claude Shannon’s 1950 prediction that studying computer chess might lead to applications in other areas fulfilled?

This panel, comprising seminal contributors to the solution of this challenge—including two of AI’s leading pioneers—will discuss these and other questions as well as the origin and development of computer chess and what it tells us about ourselves and the machines we build.
Jun 8, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
SDForum Distinguished Speaker Series
"What the Dormouse Said"
In this talk, John Markoff, Technology writer for the New York Times, highlights how 60's counterculture in the Bay Area shaped the personal computer industry.
In this talk, John Markoff, Technology writer for the New York Times, highlights how 60's counterculture in the Bay Area shaped the personal computer industry.

In this talk highlighting themes from his new book, Markoff tells the story of the how military funding of basic research, anti-war activism, and readily available psychedelic drugs converged on the mid-Peninsula in the 1960's to create a unique political and cultural environment that led to development of the personal computer.

John Markoff is a senior writer for the New York Times, and co-author of Cyberpunk: Outlaws and hackers on the Computer Frontier and the best selling Takedown: The Pursuit and Capture of Kevin Mitnick, America's Most Wanted Computer Outlaw. He is a three-time Pulizer Prize nominee.

Markoff's talk will be followed by a panel discussion including Markoff and four of the key figures whose work Markoff has chronicled:

Dennis Allison was co-founder of the Peoples Computer company, created Tiny Basic, and was a founder of Dr. Dobbs Journal. He is currently a lecturer in the Computer Systems Laboratory at Stanford and works as an independent consultant.

Bill Duvall worked in Doug Englebart's Augment group at the Stanford Research Institute, where he wrote the software that sent the first ARPANet message, and subseqeuntly moved to Xerox PARC.

Lee Felsenstein ran the Homebrew Computer Club, and designed the Sol and Osborne 1, two of the original personal computers. He is currently a partner at the Fonly Institute, a consulting and research organization focused on developing groundbreaking products that place computer power in the hands of ordinary people.

Larry Tesler worked at the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (SAIL) and later Xerox PARC and Apple, where he was Vice-President and Chief Scientist. He is currently Vice-President and Research Fellow at Yahoo, where he heads their User Experience and Design Group.
Jun 6, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
When Computers Were Human
What did it mean to be a human computer? Who were the first ones? Before Palm Pilots and iPods, PCs and laptops, the term “computer” referred to people who did scientific calculations by hand. In his book When Computers Were Human, David Alan Grier, editor of IEEE Annals of History of Computing, offers the first in-depth account of these workers, who were neither calculating geniuses nor idiot savants but knowledgeable people who, in other circumstances, might have become scientists in their own right. Beginning with the return of Halley's Comet in 1758 and the effort of three French astronomers to compute its orbit to the UNIVAC electronic computer projecting its 1986 orbit, Grier traces “human computers” through the ages. Come join Grier, along with former “computers,” for this look into a little-known slice of high tech history.

Proceeds of the book sale benefit the Computer History Museum.
What did it mean to be a human computer? Who were the first ones? Before Palm Pilots and iPods, PCs and laptops, the term “computer” referred to people who did scientific calculations by hand. In his book When Computers Were Human, David Alan Grier, editor of IEEE Annals of History of Computing, offers the first in-depth account of these workers, who were neither calculating geniuses nor idiot savants but knowledgeable people who, in other circumstances, might have become scientists in their own right. Beginning with the return of Halley's Comet in 1758 and the effort of three French astronomers to compute its orbit to the UNIVAC electronic computer projecting its 1986 orbit, Grier traces “human computers” through the ages. Come join Grier, along with former “computers,” for this look into a little-known slice of high tech history.

Proceeds of the book sale benefit the Computer History Museum.
May 25, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
My Life on the Wireless Frontier
Dr. Irwin M. Jacobs, co-founder, Chairman and CEO of QUALCOMM, in conversation with Elizabeth Corcoran, Senior Editor, Forbes
Dr. Irwin Jacobs helped found QUALCOMM in 1985 and under his leadership it became a Fortune 500 company, listed in the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index and traded on the NASDAQ. This former professor of electrical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and of computer science and engineering at the University of California-San Diego led the commercialization of Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) technology, regarded as the world's most advanced voice and data wireless communications technology. CDMA technology--which converts speech into digital information that is transmitted over a wireless network and reconverted to speech on the other end--was first demonstrated in 1989. Elizabeth Corcoran is a senior editor at Forbes Magazine and has been covering the technology sector for years from the publication’s Silicon Valley bureau. Jacobs will share with Corcoran his journey from hallowed halls of academia to the vanguard of telecommunications and also comment on the next wave of new technologies driving the wireless world.
Dr. Irwin Jacobs helped found QUALCOMM in 1985 and under his leadership it became a Fortune 500 company, listed in the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index and traded on the NASDAQ. This former professor of electrical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and of computer science and engineering at the University of California-San Diego led the commercialization of Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) technology, regarded as the world's most advanced voice and data wireless communications technology. CDMA technology--which converts speech into digital information that is transmitted over a wireless network and reconverted to speech on the other end--was first demonstrated in 1989. Elizabeth Corcoran is a senior editor at Forbes Magazine and has been covering the technology sector for years from the publication’s Silicon Valley bureau. Jacobs will share with Corcoran his journey from hallowed halls of academia to the vanguard of telecommunications and also comment on the next wave of new technologies driving the wireless world.
May 19, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Distinguished Speaker Series – The Linux Kernel Development Process
In this talk, Morton will describe how the Linux kernel actually comes to be, how features are chosen, and how the develop/test/release cycle is managed. He'll explain how commercial Linux distributions such as Red Hat and SuSE fit into this process. More generally, he'll consider what motivates kernel developers, and why system software is a particularly good fit for the open source model.
In this talk, Morton will describe how the Linux kernel actually comes to be, how features are chosen, and how the develop/test/release cycle is managed. He'll explain how commercial Linux distributions such as Red Hat and SuSE fit into this process. More generally, he'll consider what motivates kernel developers, and why system software is a particularly good fit for the open source model.
May 16, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
A Human Story of Computer Animation
It took 20 years of dreaming, planning and ingenuity to create Toy Story, the world’s first computer animated full-length feature film, in 1995. It represented a significant departure from the long-established methods of animation, where artists would hand draw characters frame by frame, and painstakingly incorporate movement and color to complete a feature film. Today, thanks to advances in computing power and ingenious software, there is little separation between the refining of an idea and its execution on screen (save for thousands of hours of rendering!).
It took 20 years of dreaming, planning and ingenuity to create Toy Story, the world’s first computer animated full-length feature film, in 1995. It represented a significant departure from the long-established methods of animation, where artists would hand draw characters frame by frame, and painstakingly incorporate movement and color to complete a feature film. Today, thanks to advances in computing power and ingenious software, there is little separation between the refining of an idea and its execution on screen (save for thousands of hours of rendering!).

On May 16, four self-described geeks—each with a passion to make animated movies—share how they discovered computer animation, and what obstacles they had to overcome in the process. They will present the entertaining and inspiring tale of how they went from an idea, to a script to the drawing board, to mathematics, to the computer lab…and ultimately to their Oscar acceptance speeches. Come hear their personal experiences with early computers—which had been developed for code breaking and complex computations—and how they were transformed to allow development of some of the most memorable images in pop culture today. This rare union of friends—pioneering artists and scientists—represents a momentous evening in animation history. The movies and innovations of these award-winning pioneers sit at the intersection of technology and art.
Apr 27, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
Innovation is Nothing New: 100-Odd Years of Venture Capital Wisdom
Reid Dennis, founder of Institutional Venture Partners, and Franklin “Pitch” Johnson, founding partner of Asset Management, review their combined 100 years of venture capital experience and observation, from the major mistakes to the spectacular successes. How does venture capital affect innovation? What have we learned? What is really new? Come learn and be entertained by the very personal stories and views of these two legendary venture capitalists.
Reid Dennis, founder of Institutional Venture Partners, and Franklin “Pitch” Johnson, founding partner of Asset Management, review their combined 100 years of venture capital experience and observation, from the major mistakes to the spectacular successes. How does venture capital affect innovation? What have we learned? What is really new? Come learn and be entertained by the very personal stories and views of these two legendary venture capitalists.
Apr 21, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
SDForum Distinguished Speaker Series
The Emerging Economic Paradigm of Open Source
In this talk, Perens will consider the economics of Open Source. Says Perens: Many people don't understand how Open Source could be sustainable, some may even feel that its effect upon the proprietary software industry is an economic detriment. Fortunately, if you look more deeply into the economic function of software in general, it's easy to establish that Open Source is both sustainable and of tremendous benefit to the overall economy. Open Source can be explained entirely within the context of conventional open-market economics. Indeed, it turns out that it has much stronger ties to the phenomenon of capitalism than you may have appreciated.
Bruce Perens is a seminal figure in the open source movement. Indeed, he helped coin the very term Open Source, and wrote the original Open Source Definition. He has been instrumental in many open source initiatives, such as the Linux Standard Base. He is editor of the Bruce Perens Open Source Series, published by Prentice Hall, and was recently named Senior Scientist for Open Source by the Cyber Security Policy Research Laboratory of George Washington University.

In this talk, Perens will consider the economics of Open Source. Says Perens: Many people don't understand how Open Source could be sustainable, some may even feel that its effect upon the proprietary software industry is an economic detriment. Fortunately, if you look more deeply into the economic function of software in general, it's easy to establish that Open Source is both sustainable and of tremendous benefit to the overall economy. Open Source can be explained entirely within the context of conventional open-market economics. Indeed, it turns out that it has much stronger ties to the phenomenon of capitalism than you may have appreciated.
Mar 23, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
Pixels and Me
Computers have revolutionized image media. Richard Lyon, one of the current pioneers of digital cameras, has found that several generations of pioneers in this field have been entangled with the terms “picture element” and “pixel” and that studying the history of the terminology is a fruitful approach to the history of the people and technology. Vladimir Zworykin's television research group at RCA popularized the term “picture element” in the 1930s, while the TV researchers at Bell Labs ignored that term, preferring “image element.” Fred Billingsley and others at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed computerized image processing and propagated the term “pixel” in the 1960s, while image processing researchers at Bell Labs ignored that term, preferring “pel.” In the early 1970s, “pixel” was spread through computer image processing publications from NASA, USC, IBM, Stanford, University of Missouri, and other places, eventually coming to be applied to elements of image sensor hardware, such as Lyon's optical mouse in 1980 and digital camera sensors more recently. Many of the people involved in this complex history have provided their personal recollections and documents to help piece the story together, and more such inputs will be solicited from the Computer History Museum audience.
Computers have revolutionized image media. Richard Lyon, one of the current pioneers of digital cameras, has found that several generations of pioneers in this field have been entangled with the terms “picture element” and “pixel” and that studying the history of the terminology is a fruitful approach to the history of the people and technology. Vladimir Zworykin's television research group at RCA popularized the term “picture element” in the 1930s, while the TV researchers at Bell Labs ignored that term, preferring “image element.” Fred Billingsley and others at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed computerized image processing and propagated the term “pixel” in the 1960s, while image processing researchers at Bell Labs ignored that term, preferring “pel.” In the early 1970s, “pixel” was spread through computer image processing publications from NASA, USC, IBM, Stanford, University of Missouri, and other places, eventually coming to be applied to elements of image sensor hardware, such as Lyon's optical mouse in 1980 and digital camera sensors more recently. Many of the people involved in this complex history have provided their personal recollections and documents to help piece the story together, and more such inputs will be solicited from the Computer History Museum audience.
Mar 17, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
SDForum Distinguished Speaker Series
Toward A Literacy of Cooperation
In regard to the role of cooperation and collective action in human enterprise, our level of knowledge is scarcely higher than knowledge about disease before the discovery of microorganisms. Descartes decreed that a “new method” was required to think about the physical world: from that new method of thinking, scientific method led to biology, biology created the knowledge that served as the foundation for medicine; before we can approach the solution to problems of conflict, cooperation, and governance - the “medicine” for social ills ¬ we need fundamental knowledge - the “biology” of collective action. But before an interdisciplinary understanding can emerge, a new way of thinking across disciplinary boundaries is required; it is that understanding we hope to catalyze.
In regard to the role of cooperation and collective action in human enterprise, our level of knowledge is scarcely higher than knowledge about disease before the discovery of microorganisms. Descartes decreed that a “new method” was required to think about the physical world: from that new method of thinking, scientific method led to biology, biology created the knowledge that served as the foundation for medicine; before we can approach the solution to problems of conflict, cooperation, and governance ¬ the “medicine” for social ills ¬ we need fundamental knowledge ¬ the “biology” of collective action. But before an interdisciplinary understanding can emerge, a new way of thinking across disciplinary boundaries is required; it is that understanding we hope to catalyze.
Mar 9, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
How Computer Storage Became a Modern Business
All of our panel members have participated in the storage industry's efforts to provide continual improvements in data storage products, industry standards, and system reliability. Their leadership has made possible much of the computer industry's movement to more flexible interconnection of storage products and systems, combined with the enhanced reliability of RAID technology, and the ability to quickly utilize the annual improvements in disk and tape products. The panel members will discuss the challenges, achievements and key events in helping storage evolve into a modern industry.
During the 1960's, most data storage systems used with mainframes and minicomputers were the ones specified by individual computer manufacturers. Since those days, the industry has evolved into a worldwide assortment of computer companies offering systems for a large, diverse mix of applications. The impact on the market for computer storage systems has been huge – Immense markets, divergent host system requirements, short product lives for storage products, numerous storage company start-ups, with valiant attempts to achieve storage product standards and reliability.

All of our panel members have participated in the storage industry's efforts to provide continual improvements in data storage products, industry standards, and system reliability. Their leadership has made possible much of the computer industry's movement to more flexible interconnection of storage products and systems, combined with the enhanced reliability of RAID technology, and the ability to quickly utilize the annual improvements in disk and tape products. The panel members will discuss the challenges, achievements and key events in helping storage evolve into a modern industry.
Feb 23, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
SDForum Distinguished Speaker Series
Python: Building an open Source Project and Community
In 1991, Guido van Rossum made his creation, the Python programming language, open source. Today, Python is one of the three P-languages which enjoy massive popularity among developers as part of the open source LAMP platform (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP/Perl/Python). In this retrospective, Guido looks back on the early days of the Python community, describes its development into maturity, and explains why he is still having a good time after 13 years of herding cats.
In 1991, Guido van Rossum made his creation, the Python programming language, open source. Today, Python is one of the three P-languages which enjoy massive popularity among developers as part of the open source LAMP platform (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP/Perl/Python). In this retrospective, Guido looks back on the early days of the Python community, describes its development into maturity, and explains why he is still having a good time after 13 years of herding cats.
Feb 23, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
From Gutenberg to Galaxy: Accessing Cultural Assets Online
Few of us dispute the importance of providing access to our cultural heritage. Yet we still seem years away from fulfilling the promises of access: opening long-dormant archives, enriching culture and begetting creativity, and turning cultural consumers into producers. What can we do, and what are we now doing, to resolve obstacles to access, whether rooted in financial, legal or quality concerns? Focusing on how we might navigate these obstacles and turn them into opportunities, our panelists will discuss what they have done to provide access to cultural assets, how their mindsets about access have developed, and where they hope cultural access will evolve.
Few of us dispute the importance of providing access to our cultural heritage. Yet we still seem years away from fulfilling the promises of access: opening long-dormant archives, enriching culture and begetting creativity, and turning cultural consumers into producers. What can we do, and what are we now doing, to resolve obstacles to access, whether rooted in financial, legal or quality concerns? Focusing on how we might navigate these obstacles and turn them into opportunities, our panelists will discuss what they have done to provide access to cultural assets, how their mindsets about access have developed, and where they hope cultural access will evolve.
Jan 26, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
Information Security—Before, During, and After Public-Key Cryptography
In the 1970s, the world of information security was transformed by public-key cryptography, the radical revision of cryptographic thinking that allowed people with no prior contact to communicate securely. “Public key” solved security problems born of the revolution in information technology that characterized the 20th century and made Internet commerce possible. Security problems rarely stay solved, however. Continuing growth in computing, networking, and wireless--including applications made possible by improvements in security—have given rise to new security problems. Where is this going? Diffie, a key figure in the discovery public-key cryptography, will trace the growth of information security through the 20th Century and into the 21st.
In the 1970s, the world of information security was transformed by public-key cryptography, the radical revision of cryptographic thinking that allowed people with no prior contact to communicate securely. “Public key” solved security problems born of the revolution in information technology that characterized the 20th century and made Internet commerce possible. Security problems rarely stay solved, however. Continuing growth in computing, networking, and wireless--including applications made possible by improvements in security—have given rise to new security problems. Where is this going? Diffie, a key figure in the discovery public-key cryptography, will trace the growth of information security through the 20th Century and into the 21st.
Jan 20, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
SDForum Distinguished Speaker Series
“What's Craigslist About: What Have We Learned? Where Are We Going?”
Introduction By Maya Draisin, Co-founder, The International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences
In 1995, Craig Newmark started craigslist which serves as a non-commercial community bulletin board with classifieds and discussion forums. Using a common sense, down-to-earth approach, craigslist strives to make the 'net more personal and authentic, while advocating social responsibility through the promotion of small, non-profit organizations. The philosophical themes of craigslist are:

*We're about people giving each other a break;

*We're about restoring the human voice to the Internet, reversing the corporate voice and over commercialization;

*We're about providing useful, down-to-earth, common-sense function.

As a result of this attitude, Craig is now recognized as one of the true pioneers of online communities.
In 1995, Craig Newmark started craigslist which serves as a non-commercial community bulletin board with classifieds and discussion forums. Using a common sense, down-to-earth approach, craigslist strives to make the 'net more personal and authentic, while advocating social responsibility through the promotion of small, non-profit organizations. The philosophical themes of craigslist are:

*We're about people giving each other a break;

*We're about restoring the human voice to the Internet, reversing the corporate voice and over commercialization;

*We're about providing useful, down-to-earth, common-sense function.

As a result of this attitude, Craig is now recognized as one of the true pioneers of online communities.
Jan 12, 2005 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
Steve Case in Conversation with Walt Mossberg
It's been nearly 20 years since America Online was founded. The world was a very different place back then. Affordable PCs were just making their way into people's homes; cellular telephones weighed around two pounds each; CD technology was still in its infancy, and most people didn't even have cable television. Little did anyone know the Internet was about to transform nearly every aspect of their lives. It was Steve Case’s belief that the online experience had unlimited potential to change the way society communicates, does business and learns about the world around us. During the past two decades, America Online, with Case at the helm, has been a key driver in pushing the Internet further into our everyday existence. Join us on January 12 as Case in conversation with Walt Mossberg, personal technology columnist for The Wall Street Journal, shares his shares his personal stories and discusses his perspectives on the Internet’s amazing evolution.
It's been nearly 20 years since America Online was founded. The world was a very different place back then. Affordable PCs were just making their way into people's homes; cellular telephones weighed around two pounds each; CD technology was still in its infancy, and most people didn't even have cable television. Little did anyone know the Internet was about to transform nearly every aspect of their lives. It was Steve Case’s belief that the online experience had unlimited potential to change the way society communicates, does business and learns about the world around us. During the past two decades, America Online, with Case at the helm, has been a key driver in pushing the Internet further into our everyday existence. Join us on January 12 as Case in conversation with Walt Mossberg, personal technology columnist for The Wall Street Journal, shares his shares his personal stories and discusses his perspectives on the Internet’s amazing evolution.
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2004 Events

Dec 16, 2004 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents
SDForum Distinguished Speaker Series - "Universal Access to all Knowledge"
Advances in computing and communications mean that we can cost-effectively store every book, sound recording, movie, software package, and public web page ever created, and provide access to these collections via the Internet to students and adults all over the world.

By mostly using existing institutions and funding sources, we can build this as well as compensate authors within what is the current worldwide library budget. The talk offers an update on the current state of progress towards that ideal, which would allow us to bequeath an accessible record of our cultural heritage to our descendants.
Advances in computing and communications mean that we can cost-effectively store every book, sound recording, movie, software package, and public web page ever created, and provide access to these collections via the Internet to students and adults all over the world.

By mostly using existing institutions and funding sources, we can build this as well as compensate authors within what is the current worldwide library budget. The talk offers an update on the current state of progress towards that ideal, which would allow us to bequeath an accessible record of our cultural heritage to our descendants.
Dec 14, 2004 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Odysseys in Technology
Music Meets The Computer
Join Chowning and Mathews in conversation with Curtis Roads, composer and music historian. This will be followed by Chryssie Nanou (pianist) performing, Duet for One Pianist.
Computers have revolutionized music-making. Two of the most important pioneers of computer music, Max Mathews and John Chowning, stand at the epicenter of this musical revolution. Research led by Mathews at Bell Laboratories, beginning in the 1950s, created a series of programming languages that are the direct precursors of today's software synthesizers. His many contributions to interactive music systems, algorithmic composition, and psychoacoustics (with Jean-Claude Risset) are equally seminal. Stanford's legendary Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA, pronounced karma) led by Chowning, has long been a hotbed of innovation. After groundbreaking research in sound spatialization, Chowning's invention of frequency modulation (FM) synthesis led to the most successful synthesizer of all time: the Yamaha DX7.

Join Chowning and Mathews in conversation with Curtis Roads, composer and music historian. This will be followed by Chryssie Nanou (pianist) performing, Duet for One Pianist. Piano supplied by Yamaha
Nov 30, 2004 6:00 PM Speaker Series
A Celebration of Kenneth Iverson
(1920-2004)
The creator of APL (A Programming Language) and J (J Language) will be
remembered and celebrated in a series of talks presented by those
who knew him well.
Dr. Kenneth Iverson, who died October 19, 2004, at the age of 83, was the creator of APL (A Programming Language) and, more recently, of J (J Language). He was a gifted mathematician, educator, and writer. Born December 17, 1920, in Camrose, Alberta, Canada, he received a BA in mathematics and physics from Queen's University in Ontario, and an MA in mathematics and PhD in applied mathematics from Harvard University.

As an assistant professor at Harvard, Iverson developed a mathematical notation for manipulating arrays that he taught to his students. In 1962 at IBM, he worked with Adin Falkoff to create the language APL based on that notation. He was named an IBM Fellow in 1970. He received the AFIPS Harry Goode Award in 1975, ACM Turing Award in 1979, IEEE Computer Pioneer Award in 1982, and the National Medal of Technology in 1991.

The creator of APL (A Programming Language) and J (J Language) will be
remembered and celebrated in a series of talks presented by those
who knew him well.
Nov 19, 2004 Speaker Series
Stump The Historians
Board members of the IEEE's Annals of the History of Computing share how they view the history of computation and what they see for the future. Come loaded with your questions and try to “stump the historians!
Board members of the IEEE's Annals of the History of Computing share how they view the history of computation and what they see for the future. Come loaded with your questions and try to “stump the historians!