Upcoming Events

Apr 7, 2015 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
Becoming Steve Jobs Authors Brent Schlender & Rick Tetzeli in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader
Becoming Steve Jobs Authors Brent Schlender & Rick Tetzeli in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Becoming Steve Jobs takes on and breaks down the existing myth and stereotypes about Steve Jobs. The conventional, one-dimensional view of Jobs is that he was half-genius, half-jerk from youth, an irascible and selfish leader who slighted friends and family alike. Becoming Steve Jobs answers the central question about the life and career of the Apple cofounder and CEO: How did a young man so reckless and arrogant that he was exiled from the company he founded become the most effective visionary business leader of our time, ultimately transforming the daily life of billions of people?
Still, I was always the reporter and Steve was the source and subject; I was the ink-stained wretch, and he was the rock star. More than anything, he wanted to get his stories told to the biggest and best audience possible, and I could give him that. For my part, I could sense he was bound for even bigger things and wanted to have a front-row seat. And so the overarching purpose for our social and personal interactions for the next 20 years would be journalistic transactions. And not all of them would please him.
Brent Schlender, Fortune Magazine
October 25, 2011


There have been many books—on a large and small scale—about Steve Jobs, one of the most famous CEOs in history. But this book is different from all the others.

Becoming Steve Jobs takes on and breaks down the existing myth and stereotypes about Steve Jobs. The conventional, one-dimensional view of Jobs is that he was half-genius, half-jerk from youth, an irascible and selfish leader who slighted friends and family alike. Becoming Steve Jobs answers the central question about the life and career of the Apple cofounder and CEO: How did a young man so reckless and arrogant that he was exiled from the company he founded become the most effective visionary business leader of our time, ultimately transforming the daily life of billions of people?

Drawing on incredible and sometimes exclusive access, Schlender and Tetzeli tell a different story of a real human being who wrestled with his failings and learned to maximize his strengths over time. Their rich, compelling narrative is filled with stories never told before from the people who knew Jobs best, and who decided to open up to the authors, including his family, former inner circle executives, and top people at Apple, Pixar and Disney, most notably Tim Cook, Jony Ive, Eddy Cue, Ed Catmull, John Lasseter, Robert Iger and many others. In addition, Brent knew Jobs personally for 25 years and draws upon his many interviews with him, on and off the record, in writing the book. He and Rick humanize the man and explain, rather than simply describe, his behavior. Along the way, the book provides rich context about the technology revolution we all have lived through, and the ways in which Jobs changed our world.

John Hollar will moderate a conversation with the authors about Steve Jobs’ evolution and also about the book’s genesis and their collaboration. Please join us.

A book signing will follow the program. Kepler's Books will be on-site selling copies of the book before and after the program.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

Apr 15, 2015 7:00 PM Special Events
CHM Presents: Revolutionaries on the Road
KQED's John Boland & NPR's Jarl Mohn in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Invitation-only Event
KQED's John Boland & NPR's Jarl Mohn in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
"Re/New: The Future of News" will kick off with a conversation with KQED President & CEO John Boland and NPR President & CEO Jarl Mohn. Boland is re-inventing KQED on a local and regional level and setting a new generation of news in motion on television, radio and the internet. Mohn, who has headed NPR for less than a year but has significant media experience, plans to extend and deepen broadcast and digital news at NPR. Together they represent some of the best thinking -and action – about the future in either commercial or public media.
In 2015 the Museum will produce a new track within our Revolutionaries series, "Re/New: The Future of News." Technology is changing everything about the news and journalism industries—from gathering to processing to disseminating, and audience behavior and participation as well. This track will feature a series of conversations with news leaders and innovators about that changing landscape.

"Re/New: The Future of News" will kick off with a conversation with KQED President & CEO John Boland and NPR President & CEO Jarl Mohn. Boland is re-inventing KQED on a local and regional level and setting a new generation of news in motion on television, radio and the internet. Mohn, who has headed NPR for less than a year but has significant media experience, plans to extend and deepen broadcast and digital news at NPR. Together they represent some of the best thinking -and action – about the future in either commercial or public media.

Tonight’s program will be an in-depth conversation with these outstanding executives about everything from their beginnings in media, the history of their organizations, how their approach to journalism is evolving, technology’s impact on what they do, and the changing nature of digital audiences. Our moderator, John Hollar, began his career as a reporter, so he’s well suited to conduct an insightful and engaging conversation with these two media mavericks.

This event is part of the Museum's acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success. Please Note: This Revolutionaries on the Road will take place in KQED’s Studio A in San Francisco. Because seating in the studio is extremely limited, the program will be invitation-only. It will be available on our YouTube channel within a week. And, KQED Radio is recording the event and will broadcast it on Saturday, April 18 at 2pm, and again on Thursday, April 23 at 8pm.
Apr 17, 2015 10:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM and CHF Presents
Moore's Law @ 50
Gordon Moore: the Man and the Law
On April 19, 1965, Gordon Moore—chemist, semiconductor pioneer, and co-founder of Intel Corporation—published a paper in Electronics magazine titled “Cramming More Components onto Integrated Circuits.” In it he set forth the concept that became known as “Moore’s Law,” a principle that has propelled the digital revolution for half a century.

Moore’s Law is an observation that the number of transistors on microchips doubles roughly every two years – making electronics both less expensive and better -- and has held true since Moore first made the prediction.
On April 19, 1965, Gordon Moore—chemist, semiconductor pioneer, and co-founder of Intel Corporation—published a paper in Electronics magazine titled “Cramming More Components onto Integrated Circuits.” In it he set forth the concept that became known as “Moore’s Law,” a principle that has propelled the digital revolution for half a century.

Moore’s Law is an observation that the number of transistors on microchips doubles roughly every two years – making electronics both less expensive and better — and has held true since Moore first made the prediction. The impact of Moore’s Law is computing that has become cheap, powerful and ubiquitous. In this, Gordon Moore has been both a visionary and prime mover of the Information Age.

Moore’s life story is one of an innovator and businessman whose influence on technology is arguably as profound as that of Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, or Bill Gates. Now, for the first time, that story is told in his authorized biography—Moore’s Law: The Life of Gordon Moore, Silicon Valley’s Quiet Revolutionary. The book chronicles Moore’s life—from his upbringing and education in California to his professional career at Shockley Semiconductor, Fairchild and Intel. It gives context to the high-tech dynamism he helped to unleash, and provides a clear and accessible introduction to the story of silicon electronics—the technological foundation that has transformed commerce, defense and every-day life around the world.


In partnership with the Chemical Heritage Foundation, we will celebrate the 50th anniversary of Moore’s Law with a two-part symposium.

Part 1: Moore's Law: The Life of Gordon Moore, Silicon Valley's Quiet Revolutionary

The morning session will feature a conversation with the biography’s co-authors Arnold Thackray and David C. Brock. Thackray and Brock are both senior figures at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia—Thackray is the Chancellor, and Brock is Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Research. Together with London-based journalist Rachel Jones, they have meticulously crafted a biography that clearly reveals Moore’s life and his contributions. Museum CEO John Hollar will lead an in-depth conversation with Thackray and Brock about their writing and the impact of Moore’s work. Please reserve your spot by registering at the link below.

Part 2: Moore's Law: Past and Future

In the afternoon, Brock will moderate a panel session on the past and future of Moore’s Law. Panelists include 2002 Museum Fellow Carver Mead, the Gordon and Betty Moore Professor Emeritus of Engineering and Applied Science at the California Institute of Technology, and William H. Davidow, partner at Mohr Davidow Ventures, former Intel executive and author of several books on technology, including Overcorrected. The afternoon panel will also feature the Silicon Valley premiere of a 13-minute video of Gordon Moore himself speaking on Moore’s Law, its impact, and future. Please reserve your spot by registering at the link below.

We are also delighted to welcome Jody Roberts, Director for the Institute for Research at CHF, who also will be taking part in the day’s events.

Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of Moore's Law: The Life of Gordon Moore, Silicon Valley's Quiet Revolutionary before and after the program. There will be a book signing when the program adjourns.

Join us for this fascinating look at the life of one of the computing epoch’s most influential figures and a glimpse ahead at the implications for Moore’s Law in the future.
Apr 25, 2015 6:00 PM Fellow Awards
CHM Presents
2015 Fellow Awards
2015 Fellow Awards
On April 25, the Computer History Museum will be honoring the achievements of the 2015 Fellows whose creativity, persistence, vision, and global influence in the field of computing have helped shape our everyday lives.
On April 25, the Computer History Museum will be honoring the achievements of the 2015 Fellows whose creativity, persistence, vision, and global influence in the field of computing have helped shape our everyday lives.

The Fellow Awards annually honor distinguished technology leaders who have forever changed the world with their accomplishments. These prestigious awards celebrate the Fellows, their advancement of computing history, and the positive impact of their contributions on global society. The Computer History Museum is proud to highlight and preserve the stories of these esteemed technology heroes for future generations.

THE 2015 FELLOW HONOREES
Evelyn Berezin, for her early work in computer design
and a lifetime of entrepreneurial activity.

Charles Bachman, for his early work on developing
database management systems.

Bjarne Stroustrup, for his invention of the C++
programming language.
May 5, 2015 7:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace & Babbage Author Sydney Padua in Conversation with Google Doodle Leader Ryan Germick
Sydney Padua in Conversation with Google Doodle Leader Ryan Germick
Sydney Padua is a graphic artist and animator. Sydney wrote this “Steampunk” graphic novel based on thorough research on the biographies and correspondence between Babbage and Lovelace, as well as other bits of early Victoriana, which is then twisted for humorous effect. Ryan Germick, our moderator, first graced the Museum’s stage in 2012 as a panel participant in The Art & Technology of Google Doodles Revolutionaries program. His pairing with Sydney will most definitely result in a thrilling and adventurous evening you won’t want to miss. Please join us.
A graphic novel debut that transforms a compelling scientific collaboration into an unexpected -- and hilarious -- series of adventures

A unique take on the unrealized invention of the computer in the 1830s by the eccentric polymath Charles Babbage and his accomplice, the daughter of Lord Byron, Ada, Countess of Lovelace. When Ada translated her friend Babbage's plans for the "Difference Engine," her lengthy footnotes contained the first appearance of the general computing theory—one hundred years before an actual computer was built. Sadly, Lovelace died of cancer a few years after publishing the paper, and Babbage never built any of his machines. But now Sydney Padua gives us an alternate reality in which Lovelace and Babbage do build the Difference Engine, and then use it to do battle with the American banking system, the publishing industry, their own fears that their project will lose funding, and a villainous street musician who will force the two friends to reevaluate their priorities—"for the sake of both London and science."

Sydney Padua is a graphic artist and animator. Sydney wrote this “Steampunk” graphic novel based on thorough research on the biographies and correspondence between Babbage and Lovelace, as well as other bits of early Victoriana, which is then twisted for humorous effect. Ryan Germick, our moderator, first graced the Museum’s stage in 2012 as a panel participant in The Art & Technology of Google Doodles Revolutionaries program. His pairing with Sydney will most definitely result in a thrilling and adventurous evening you won’t want to miss. Please join us.

There will be a book signing following tonight’s program. Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of the book before and after the program.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

Members, please note that there is no member reception before the program. The Cloud Café will be open, come grab a quick bite, a glass of wine and connect with fellow CHM friends!