Upcoming Events

Oct 1, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Featuring Planet's Matthew Ferraro
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Oct 15, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 1: Introductory
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 1 introduces students to concepts of computer programming, as participants work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to “program” a partner through a life-size maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. This program is suitable for students with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity, to help students gain confidence and see themselves as active, capable problem-solvers and future innovators.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8. Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Oct 16, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Oct 26, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Exponential Center and NextGen Advisory Board
Day of the Dead: Post-Mortems of Silicon Valley Failures
Twitch's Justin Kan and Garage Technology Ventures' Bill Reichert in conversation with Exponential's Marguerite Gong Hancock
Join us as Silicon Valley veterans Justin Kan, co-founder of Twitch, and Bill Reichert, managing director of Garage Technology Ventures, share postmortems of their industry successes and failures.
The most famous startup stories often have storybook endings: founders hatch daring and disruptive ideas, secure funding by venture capitalists, create billion dollar companies, and change the world. But for every big success, there are many more tech companies that fail.

Silicon Valley is unique in its toleration--and even celebration--of failure. Failure is not a badge of honor for its own sake, but an acceptable cost on the way to success: “Fail fast. Succeed Faster.”

Even entrepreneurs known for being winners go through failures of many stripes--fizzles, flops, false steps, even frauds. Some are permanent; others are hard-won lessons on the way to the next big thing.

What can we learn from some epic (and more quiet) failures? What differentiates between productive failure and fatal failure? What signs should entrepreneurs heed to declare a failed product, service, or start-up dead? In dark times, what are effective strategies to re-boot? How do the best failures yield valuable lessons and spawn something new?

Justin Kan is an internet entrepreneur and partner at seed fund Y Combinator. Justin has founded many companies including: Kiko, the first AJAX web calendar; Justin.tv, a live video streaming platform; Socialcam, a mobile video sharing app (acquired for $60mm by Autodesk in 2012); Twitch, a video game streaming platform (acquired by for $970mm by Amazon in 2014); and Exec, an on demand maid service (acquired by Handybook in 2014).

Bill Reichert is Managing Director of Garage Technology Ventures. Since 1998, Bill and Garage have helped many great companies get their start, including Pandora Media, LeftHand Networks, Kaboodle, WhiteHat Security, Tripwire, and D.light Design. Prior to co-founding Garage, Bill was a co-founder or senior executive in several venture-backed technology startups, including Trademark Software, The Learning Company, and Academic Systems.

Join us as Silicon Valley veterans Justin Kan, co-founder of Twitch, and Bill Reichert, managing director of Garage Technology Ventures, share postmortems of their industry successes and failures.

Nov 5, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build Mentors' Special Edition
Level 1: Introductory
This special event welcomes mentors and their middle school-aged mentees to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Mentor pairs will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology...
Mentor pairs and groups supported by organizations throughout the Bay Area are invited to participate in a special Design_Code_Build event!

This special event welcomes mentors and their middle school-aged mentees to take part in an exploration of computer programming concepts. Mentor pairs will work hands-on with Raspberry Pi technology, write detailed instruction sets to "program" each other through a life-sized maze, and learn about the relevance and impact of computer history. The event is suitable for participants with little to no programming experience and focuses on core concepts of collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.

This Design_Code_Build program is a one-day event filled with hands-on experiences that provide opportunities for mentors and students to learn with and from each other and become inspired as they share ideas. Students will also see engineering, science, technology and math as exciting adventures that they can participate in. The event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who will share the knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion gained through their personal journey.

Please note that this event is for students in grades 6 through 8 and their adult mentors. Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Nov 6, 2016 9:30 AM Education Event
Broadcom Presents
Design_Code_Build
Level 2: Intermediate
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in.
The Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from around the Bay Area to a series of one-day events that provide opportunities for all individuals to challenge themselves, become inspired, and see engineering, science, technology, and math as an exciting adventure that they can participate in. Each 100-student event features a keynote “rock star” speaker from the tech industry who shares his or her knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion with the participants. Rock stars explore their personal journeys and share insights about their work and industry that help to inspire curiosity and interest. The program is also supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors, providing participants with the opportunity to meet and get to know real people from the tech industry.

Level 2 builds on the introductory program, digging deeper into the engineering design process as students work in small teams to solve a tech challenge using Raspberry Pi technology. Throughout the day, participants design, code, and build with a variety of electronic components and household supplies, and explore the Museum’s galleries as they learn from history to design for the future. This program is suitable for students who have previously participated in the introductory program or who have some experience with computer programming.

Please note that this program is for students in grades 6 through 8.
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is developed and led by the Computer History Museum and made possible with generous support from our sponsors.
Nov 18, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Working on ENIAC
Rethinking the Myths of Innovation with ENIAC in Action author Thomas Haigh
Join us as Thomas Haigh discusses his new book and the men and, in particular, women involved in the creation of design of the ENIAC.
Books and shows about the history of information technology have usually focused on great inventors and technical breakthroughs, from Charles Babbage and Alan Turing to Steve Jobs and the World Wide Web. Work by non-geniuses, particularly operations work, has been written out of the popular history of innovation, but without it no computer would be useful. Information historian Thomas Haigh is writing it back in.

This talk will focus on ENIAC, the first general purpose electronic computer, based on research for his book ENIAC in Action: Making and Remaking the Modern Computer, recently published by MIT Press. Haigh’s book explains that the six women now celebrated as the “first computer programmers” were actually hired as computer operators and worked hands-on with the machine around the clock. Other women, who actually built ENIAC, have been forgotten entirely, as have the contributions of other people working on vital aspects of the project, from procuring the right kind of wire to saving ENIAC from flood water. Haigh’s concluding comments relate this historical material to the human labor and physical infrastructure today vanishing from public view into the “cloud.”

Join us as Thomas Haigh discusses his new book and the men and, in particular, women involved in the creation of design of the ENIAC.
We are very pleased that Books, Inc. will be selling copies of ENIAC in Action before and after the program.
Dec 7, 2016 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Preservation Game
Saving Bletchley Park Author Sue Black in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Join us as Sue Black discusses her book, her life and career, and the campaign that saved Bletchley Park.
The destruction of cultural heritage sites cannot always be avoided, but for every instance of nature devastating a historical landmark there are easily as many cases where mankind knowingly and willfully destroys its own history in the name of progress, profit, or real estate. Losses like that can be averted, and often are thanks to the efforts of historically-minded individuals that galvanize populations and decision makers into rethinking plans for redevelopment of landmarks. In those cases, there’s usually a good story to go along with it.

That’s the case with Sue Black and Bletchley Park. Black, a single mother of three, began taking math courses while living in a women’s refuge. Those classes led to an undergraduate degree from South Bank University and, eventually, a PhD from the same institution. After becoming a Senior Research Associate at University College London, Black organized a web and social media campaign, making exceptional use of Twitter and Facebook, to preserve Bletchley Park, the headquarters for British decryption programs during World War II. Her book, Saving Bletchley Park, details the preservation initiative and was the fastest crowdfunded book of all time.

Join us as Sue Black discusses her book, her life and career, and the campaign that saved Bletchley Park.
We are very pleased that Books, Inc. will be selling copies of Saving Bletchley Parkbefore and after the program.
Dec 14, 2016 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Process
Track Changes Author Matthew Kirschenbaum in Conversation with Science Fiction Author David Gerrold
Join us as Author Matthew Kirschenbaum and Gerrold discuss the evolution and history of word processing, the early adopters of the technology, and discuss the impact it has had on the creative process.
The advent of word processing in the 20th century revolutionized the tools available to writers, but less clear are the effects it has had on the actual writing process. How many writers embraced the new technology? Did it affect their process? How did it change our understanding of writing?

In Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing, Matthew Kirschenbaum, associate professor in the University of Maryland’s English department, examines how the interests and ideals of creative authorship came to coexist with the computer revolution. He will be joined onstage by famed science fiction screenwriter and novelist David Gerrold, perhaps best known for writing the Star Trek episode “The Trouble with Tribbles,” the science fiction novel When HARLIE Was One, and his Hugo and Nebula award winning novelette The Martian Child. Gerrold built his first computer in 1978 and has many tech and computer columns and articles to his credit.

Join us as Kirschenbaum and Gerrold discuss the evolution and history of word processing, the early adopters of the technology, and discuss the impact it has had on the creative process.
We are very pleased that Books, Inc. will be selling copies of Track Changes before and after the program.
Jan 17, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
How the World Builds Software
A Conversation with GitHub CEO Chris Wanstrath
Join us as GitHub CEO and Co-founder Chris Wanstrath discusses the fascinating story of GitHub’s growth, the most amazing pieces of software built on the platform, and his vision for the future of coding education.
Launched in 2008, social-coding site GitHub supports over 15 million users who use the online platform to collaborate, build, and store software. Appealing to organizations with a large base of software developers, including Google, NASA, and even the White House, GitHub taps into the growing enthusiasm for open source projects and currently houses the world’s largest collection of public software. The site’s popularity among its user community has also attracted attention and dollars from major investors, including Sequoia Capital and Andreessen Horowitz. Last year, the company raised $250 million, valuing it at more than $2 billion.

GitHub CEO Chris Wanstrath, who was named to Fortune’s “40 Under 40” in 2015, likens the medium to Facebook but for programmers. “You log in, you’re connected to people, but instead of seeing photos of their baby, you see their code,” he says.

Join us as GitHub CEO and Co-founder Chris Wanstrath discusses the fascinating story of GitHub’s growth, the most amazing pieces of software built on the platform, and his vision for the future of coding education.