Upcoming Events

Jul 20, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
Science Slam: Computing & Anthropology, Astronomy and More
Series of Short Presentations from the Wonderfest Science Envoys
We’re teaming up with Wonderfest to explore the role of technology in scientific fields like astronomy, anthropology and more! Through a series of short, informal presentations, you will meet 5 young PhD students committed to increasing public understanding and awareness of science.
We’re teaming up with Wonderfest to explore the role of technology in scientific fields like astronomy, anthropology and more! Through a series of short, informal presentations, you will meet 5 young PhD students committed to increasing public understanding and awareness of science. All of our featured speakers are part of Wonderfest’s Science Envoys program, which helps budding researchers develop public outreach and presentation skills.

Wonderfest’s mission is to inspire and nurture a deep sense of wonder about the world. Wonderfest programs stimulate curiosity, promote careful reasoning, challenge unexamined beliefs, and encourage lifelong learning. Wonderfest achieves these ends through public science gatherings in the San Francisco Bay Area and through online science discourse & video that reach around the world.
Jul 25, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Inside the Transformation
Quantum Questions
Microsoft Research’s Matthias Troyer, Google Quantum AI Lab’s John Martinis & IBM Research’s Pat Gumann
Microsoft Principal Researcher Matthias Troyer, Google Quantum AI Lab Member John Martinis, and IBM Research Staff Member Pat Gumann join Center for Software History Director David C. Brock to discuss the history of quantum computing, their current work, and predictions for the future.
Imagine an entirely new kind of computer based on the surprising physics of the quantum world. They leave digital computing behind in order to solve some incredibly complex calculations in a flash. Such a machine could leave our most powerful digital supercomputers behind for modeling everything from molecules to the climate, changing the way we understand our planet, develop medicines, crack codes, and analyze financial markets. This is the vision for quantum computing.

Academic research labs, startups and tech giants are all making significant bets on making quantum computing a reality. But what exactly is quantum computing and what distinguishes it from the computers we use today? What are the different approaches to making a quantum computer? Have any been made? What impact could quantum computing have on our lives?

Join us as Center for Software History Director David C. Brock leads a conversation with researchers from Google, IBM, and Microsoft about the history, the science, and the future applications of quantum computing.

This event is produced by the Center for Software History @ CHM.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page.
Aug 3, 2018 5:00 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
General Magic
Film Screening and Panel Discussion with the “Magicians”
Voted one of the top ten films of Tribeca 2018 by Time Out Magazine, GENERAL MAGIC is a feature documentary about how great vision and epic failure changed the world as we now know it. Join us for a special screening followed by a panel discussion featuring former General Magic employees featured in the film.
Voted one of the top ten films of Tribeca 2018 by Time Out Magazine, GENERAL MAGIC is a feature documentary about how great vision and epic failure changed the world as we now know it.
From the smartphones that sit in our pockets to an array of technologies we take for granted today, many of the ideas that now dominate the tech industry and our day-to-day lives were born in 1989 at a Silicon Valley startup most of us have never heard of - General Magic.

The first smart phones, social media, e-commerce, touch screen, and even the beloved emojis all had their origins at General Magic . But this was before the internet, before 3G, before Google, and when only a few people had mobile phones. The world was not ready in 1995 to hold the world in its hands.

Extraordinary creativity, remarkable breakthroughs, fierce competition, hubris and heartbreaking betrayal dominated behind the scenes of General Magic. While some never recovered from the failure that accompanied its downfall and bankruptcy, others went on to soar. The lessons learnt at General Magic were instrumental in the creation of the iPod, iPhone, Android, eBay, even in the corridors of President Obama’s White House. And although General Magic died, the concepts and the people who worked there went on to change how the world connects today.

Described by Forbes as “The most important dead company in Silicon Valley” and combining rare archive footage with contemporary stories of the General Magicians today, this documentary tracks the progress of anytime, anywhere communication from a thing of sci-fi fiction to our modern day reality.

Join us for a special screening of this fascinating documentary followed by a panel discussion with some of the “magicians” featured in the film.

To learn more about the film, please visit General Magic Movie
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative cuisine from CateredToo, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.
Aug 15, 2018 3:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM and IEEE Present
Celebrating the Birthplace of Silicon Valley
Shockley Semiconductor Dedication at 391 San Antonio Road
Join early semiconductor pioneers, the president of IEEE, and local officials on August 15 to commemorate this legendary Silicon Valley landmark. Guests are invited to enjoy a series of presentations and exhibits and view the stunning sculptures and plaques.
The scientists and engineers who worked at 391 San Antonio Road in Mountain View, California, laid the technological and cultural foundations for today’s Silicon Valley. Employing some of the most brilliant young minds in the business, Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory produced Northern California’s first silicon transistor prototypes in the mid-1950s. However, due to William Shockley’s difficult management style, eight Shockley employees—including Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce, Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Jean Hoerni, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, and Sheldon Roberts—resigned in September 1957 and founded Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation. Fairchild was the seedling from which companies valued at over $2 trillion have grown and the source of the integrated circuit “computer chip” that has revolutionized our world.

Now, nearly 70 years later, the site of Shockley Labs, already an IEEE Historical Milestone, is being formally recognized by the IEEE and the City of Mountain View for its historical significance in a special dedication ceremony on August 15. Thanks to the efforts of many, especially developer Merlone Geier Partners, newly commissioned public sculptures—in the likeness of two early semiconductor devices and a mammoth silicon crystal monument that symbolize the work to come out of the lab—now permanently mark the site, along with various plaques that describe and commemorate the site’s history.

The event’s featured speaker is Professor James F. Gibbons, former dean of engineering at Stanford University. Prof Gibbons’ first task at Stanford in 1957 was to work with Shockley and his team to transfer their knowledge of silicon fabrication to Stanford, which could in turn train future engineers for the coming boom in the semiconductor industry. He will share his personal experiences and memories of those early days.
Join early semiconductor pioneers, the president of the IEEE, and local officials on August 15 to commemorate this legendary Silicon Valley landmark. Guests are invited to enjoy a series of presentations and exhibits and view the stunning sculptures and plaques.


The event is free to attend and open to the public. Space is limited so please sign up to guarantee a seat. Location: 391 San Antonio Rd, Palo Alto, CA (Phase II of San Antonio Village)Free Parking.
Aug 15, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Technically Speaking
Tomorrow’s Computers: More Moore?
An Evening with Intel Senior Fellow Mark Bohr and DARPA’s Microsystems Technology Officer William Chappell
Join us as Center for Software History Director David C. Brock leads a conversation with Intel Senior Fellow and Director of Process Architecture and Integration Mark Bohr and Director of Microsystems Technology Office at DARPA William Chappell about the status of Moore’s Law, the limits of silicon, and the emerging alternative technologies that will shape the future of computing.
A single iPhone today has more power than the NASA computer that took astronauts to the moon. A smartwatch has more memory than computers that used to fill an entire room. So how did we get here? In 1965, Intel and Fairchild Semiconductor cofounder Gordon Moore predicted that the number of electronic components squeezed onto an integrated circuit will double each year. This bold observation, now widely known as Moore’s Law, has not only resulted in smaller, faster, and cheaper computer chips, but has also enabled the creation of life-changing technologies, from smartphones to spreadsheets. When Moore made his prediction, there were about 30 components on a chip and transistors cost about $8 .Today, billions of transistors fit on a chip the size of your fingernail and transistors cost a mere billionth of a penny.

However, computing companies have already reported that the rate of acceleration Moore predicted is slowing. In a 2015 interview with IEEE Spectrum, Moore himself predicted that we are approaching the limits of his observation. Could Moore’s Law truly come to an end and what could this mean for the future of technological innovation?

Join us as Center for Software History Director David C. Brock leads a conversation with Intel Senior Fellow and Director of Process Architecture and Integration Mark Bohr and Director of Microsystems Technology Office at DARPA William Chappell about the status of Moore’s Law, the limits of silicon, and the emerging alternative technologies that will shape the future of computing.
This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page.
Sep 7, 2018 5:00 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
From STEM to STEAM: How an Engineer Wrote a Play
Film Screening followed by a Panel Discussion
Join us for the Bay Area debut screening of the award-winning narrative science film Humanity Needs Dreamers: A Visit With Marie Curie (40 mins), based on Frontczak’s performance. The film will be followed by a keynote presentation & panel discussion exploring the intersection of STEM and the performing arts — and why STEAM is vital in shaping global opportunities in the 21st century.
How can software engineering inspire work in theater and film?

After spending more than a decade at Hewlett Packard, learn how Susan Marie Frontczak’s background in engineering, math and performing arts helped her create an acclaimed living history portrayal of world-renowed scientist Marie Skłodowska Curie.

Join us for the Bay Area debut screening of the award-winning narrative science film Humanity Needs Dreamers: A Visit With Marie Curie (40 mins), based on Frontczak’s performance. The film will be followed by a keynote presentation & panel discussion exploring the intersection of STEM and the performing arts — and why STEAM is vital in shaping global opportunities in the 21st century.
As one of the world’s most renowned scientists, two-time Nobel Prize winner Marie Skłodowska Curie is best known for pioneering the field of radioactivity — including early experiments to treat cancer with radium therapy — but few understand the obstacles she faced just to enter the laboratory.

What if she could tell her story?
Humanity Needs Dreamers: A Visit With Marie Curie invites audiences to meet Marie Curie as she recollects her quest to isolate two elements — polonium and radium. From her childhood in Poland to groundbreaking research in France, Dr. Curie shares the struggles, failures and triumphs behind her scientific discoveries and remarkable collaboration with companion scientist & husband Pierre Curie.

Produced & Directed by Jen Myronuk, Humanity Needs Dreamers is an immersive living history film designed to be screened with a live audience, breaking the digital fourth wall between theater and cinema. Produced by STEM on Stage, a STEAM initiative to promote narrative science through living history film & immersive media. STEM on Stage is part of a NSF-funded collaborative outreach study with Princeton Center for Complex Materials.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative cuisine from CateredToo, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.