Upcoming Events

Oct 20, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Oct 27, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Nov 7, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Wonder Women: Entrepreneurship, Education, and New Frontiers
In Conversation with Calico Chief Computing Officer Daphne Koller and GoldieBlox Founder Debra Sterling
Two innovative entrepreneurs share how they use technology and learning to expand the frontiers of bodies and minds. Calico Chief Computing Officer Daphne Koller and GoldieBlox Co-founder Debra Sterling join Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to discuss their work improving health and empowering girls. Join us as Koller and Sterling share their stories and offer insights into what the future holds for all of us.
It takes hard work, hard science, and hard-core commitment to change the world. But Calico Chief Computing Officer Daphne Koller and GoldieBlox CEO and Co-Founder Debra Sterling are doing it. These technologists turned entrepreneurs are creating building blocks for achieving healthier lives and empowering girls to meet their potential.

As CCO at Calico, Daphne Koller teaches computers how to learn from biological data to deliver personalized medicine. Prior to this, she co-founded Coursera, a company revolutionizing global education through universal online access. A leader in machine learning and probabilistic modeling, Koller was recognized as one of Fast Company’s Most Creative People in 2014.

Engineer Debbie Sterling is on a mission to disrupt the “pink aisle” in toy stores globally. Her award-winning children’s multimedia company, GoldieBlox, challenges gender stereotypes with the world’s first girl engineer character. She was recently added to Fortune magazine’s 40 Under 40 list.

Koller and Sterling were both named Presidential Ambassadors for Global Entrepreneurship by President Obama for their entrepreneurial leadership in education. Join us as Koller and Sterling share their stories and offer insights into what the future holds for all of us.
About the Exponential Center @CHM
This event is produced by the Exponential Center @CHM. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Nov 10, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Yesterday’s Computer of Tomorrow: The Xerox Alto
Live Alto Demonstrations by: Doug Brotz, Dan Ingalls, Tom Malloy, John Shoch, Charles Simonyi, Bob Sproull.
How did personal computing start? Many credit Apple and IBM for this radical shift, but in 1973, years before the Apple II and IBM PC, Xerox built the Alto, a computer its makers thought could become the “computer of tomorrow.” The Alto embodied for the first time many of the defining features of personal computing that seem natural now, over forty years later: individual use; interactive, graphical displays; networking; graphical interfaces with overlapping windows and icons; WYSIWYG word processing; browsers; email; and the list goes on. The birthplace of this pioneering machine was Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), which assembled a remarkable collection of computer scientists and engineers who made real their idea of “distributed personal computing.”

Join us for an evening of live demonstrations and discussions of the Alto and its remarkable software, presented by original members of the PARC team: Doug Brotz; Dan Ingalls; Tom Malloy; John Shoch, Charles Simonyi; and Bob Sproull. This will be a unique opportunity to learn about yesterday’s computer of tomorrow that profoundly shaped our world.
How did personal computing start? Many credit Apple and IBM for this radical shift, but in 1973, years before the Apple II and IBM PC, Xerox built the Alto, a computer its makers thought could become the “computer of tomorrow.” The Alto embodied for the first time many of the defining features of personal computing that seem natural now, over forty years later: individual use; interactive, graphical displays; networking; graphical interfaces with overlapping windows and icons; WYSIWYG word processing; browsers; email; and the list goes on . The birthplace of this pioneering machine was Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), which assembled a remarkable collection of computer scientists and engineers who made real their idea of “distributed personal computing.”

Original members of the PARC team will present live demonstrations of, and discuss, some of the Alto’s remarkable achievements: Tom Malloy and Charles Simonyi will present Bravo, the WYSIWYG word processor; Bob Sproull will show the graphics programs Markup and Draw; Doug Brotz will display the email client Laurel; Dan Ingalls will reveal the breakthrough programming environment and language Smalltalk; and John Shoch will survey the Alto’s other accomplishments. Our program will close with an audience Q&A session with the PARC presenters. The event will be moderated by David C. Brock, Director of the Museum’s Center for Software History. This will be a unique opportunity to learn about yesterday’s computer of tomorrow that profoundly shaped our world.

This event is co-produced by the Museum’s Center for Software History @CHM(, which collects preserves, interprets, and presents to the world the history of software and its ongoing impact on global society. The Center for Software History’s Al Kossow restored two Xerox Alto computers starting in March of 2017 as part of the center’s Alto System Project. An extensive Alto software archive has been preserved by Al Kossow and extensively curated by valued Museum volunteer Paul McJones, and it publicly available on the Museum’s website. You can learn more about the revolutionary Alto in our permanent exhibition, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing.
About the Center for Software History
The purpose of the Center for Software History is to collect, preserve, and interpret the history of software and its transformational effects on global society. Software is what a computer does. The existence of code reflects the story of the people who made it. The transformational effects of software are the consequences of peoples’ creation and use of code. In the stories of these people lie the technical, business, and cultural histories of software—from timesharing services to the Cloud, from custom code to packaged programs, from developers to entrepreneurs, from smartphones to supercomputers.

The center is exploring these people-centered stories, documenting software-in-action, and leveraging the Museum’s rich collections to tell the story of software, preserve this history, and put it to work today for gauging where we are, where we have been, and where we might be going. For details, see computerhistory.org/softwarehistory.
Nov 15, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Future of War
Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick in Conversation with the New York Times' Nicole Perlroth
How is the US government using technology to protect its citizens—and prosecute hackers? How have policy initiatives in this area changed as hacks have intensified? And what does national cybersecurity policy look like under President Donald Trump?

Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick joins us to consider these questions and more.
In 2012, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta warned that the US was at risk of a “cyber Pearl Harbor.” He pointed to rapid technological advancement in aggressor nations like China, Russia, and Iran, and cited security holes in American transportation, financial, and government systems.

Panetta’s statements came one year or more prior to state-sponsored attacks on the United States Office of Personnel Management, the State Department, Sony, the New York Times, Google, and many others. In the five years after Panetta’s dire comments, it has become clear that cyber threats are no longer just the work of teenagers in parents’ basements or even organized crime groups.

How is the US government using technology to protect its citizens—and prosecute hackers? How have policy initiatives in this area changed as hacks have intensified? How is the government working with the private sector to prevent attacks? And what does national cybersecurity policy look like under President Donald Trump?

Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick joins us to consider these questions and more. Endgame is a next-generation endpoint security software company that automates the hunt for the most advanced cyber threats. He is also an operating partner at Bessemer Venture Partners, where he works with management teams to build durable companies. Before joining Endgame, Nate was CEO of the Center for a New American Security, a national security research organization. He served as a Marine Corps infantry and reconnaissance officer, including combat tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. His book about that experience, One Bullet Away, was a New York Times bestseller, a Washington Post "Best Book of the Year," and one of the Military Times "Best Military Books of the Decade."

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Nov 30, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Imagineers of War
Author Sharon Weinberger in Conversation with Museum Historian John Markoff
From Agent Orange to Predator drones, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has developed some of the world’s most infamous warfare technologies. Today, the agency’s work is at the forefront of innovation in robotics and autonomous driving. How has DARPA played such a quiet—yet impactful—role in the development of both military and civilian technology?

Join us as Sharon Weinberger shares her most riveting findings about DARPA’s history and her vision for its future.
From Agent Orange to Predator drones, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has developed some of the world’s most infamous warfare technologies. However, this testing ground for solving the Pentagon’s biggest challenges has also created digital tools we rely on daily, like the internet and graphical user interfaces. Today, the agency’s work is at the forefront of innovation in robotics and autonomous driving. How has DARPA played such a quiet—yet impactful—role in the development of both military and civilian technology?

Journalist and author Sharon Weinberger’s newest book, The Imagineers of War: The Untold Story of DARPA, is a comprehensive look at the history and modern impact of DARPA. She follows the agency from its founding in response to the Sputnik launch in 1958 to its recent success in self-driving cars. Weinberger’s account is drawn from interviews with dozens of Pentagon and DARPA officials (many of whom have never been interviewed about their work before), as well as public records obtained through the Freedom of Information Act.

As a journalist and author covering the intersection of national security, science, and technology, Weinberger’s job is reporting on “War 2.0.” She is the national security editor at The Intercept and the author of Imaginary Weapons: A Journey Through the Pentagon’s Scientific Underworld. She is currently a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Weinberger has written about military science and technology for Nature, BBC, Discover, Slate, Wired, and The Washington Post, among others.

Join us as Sharon Weinberger shares her most riveting findings about DARPA’s history and her vision for its future.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.

We are pleased to have Books Inc. onsite selling copies of The Imagineers of War: The Untold Story of DARPA, before and after the program.
Dec 6, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Programmed Inequality
Dr. Marie Hicks in Conversation with the Museum's Center for Software History Director David C. Brock
In her book, Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing, author and historian Dr. Marie Hicks explores how changing gender discrimination, labor demographics, and government policy led to the UK’s rise and fall as a leader in computing. She also explains how Britain’s lag in technological progress had detrimental economic effects on the UK—and why the US may be facing the same risks today.

Dr. Marie Hicks sits down with David C. Brock, Director of the Museum’s Center for Software History, to share insights from her book.
According to the National Center for Women & Information Technology, women held just 25 percent of professional computing jobs in the US in 2015. How damaging is this gender gap to the future of the tech industry?

The rise and fall of Britain’s electronic computing industry between 1944–1974 holds clues. In her book, Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing, historian Marie Hicks explores how gender discrimination, changing labor demographics, and government policy during this 30-year period shaped the UK’s path in computing. She also explains how this path had detrimental economic effects on the UK—and why the US may be facing similar risks today.

Dr. Marie Hicks sits down with David C. Brock, Director of the Museum’s Center for Software History, to share insights from her book.

Hicks received her BA from Harvard University and her MA and PhD from Duke University. Before entering academia, she worked as a UNIX systems administrator. She is currently an assistant professor of history at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. Her work focuses on how gender and sexuality bring hidden technological dynamics to light and how women’s experiences change the core narratives of the history of computing.


This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
The Programmed Inequality event is co-produced by the Museum's Center for Software History, which collects, preserves, interprets, and presents to the world the history of software and its ongoing impact on global society.

We are pleased to have Books Inc. onsite selling copies of Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computingbefore and after the program.
Dec 13, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Troublemakers: The Story of Silicon Valley's Coming of Age
Historian and Author Leslie Berlin in Conversation with Museum’s Marguerite Gong Hancock
In Troublemakers, historian Leslie Berlin introduces the people and stories behind the birth of the Internet and the microprocessor, as well as Apple, Atari, Genentech, Xerox PARC, ROLM, ASK, and the iconic venture capital firms Sequoia Capital and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. In the space of only seven years and thirty-five miles, five major industries—personal computing, video games, biotechnology, modern venture capital, and advanced semiconductor logic—were born.
“Leslie Berlin is a master historian of Silicon Valley, and the publication of this book is a landmark event. Kaleidoscopic, ambitious and brilliant the book draws on the dazzling case of the characters to chart the rise of the five industries that have come to define technology today, and collectively, to remake the world.”

-Eric Schmidt, Former CEO of Google and Executive Chairman of Alphabet, Inc.

The richly told narrative of the Silicon Valley generation that launched five major high-tech industries in seven years, laying the foundation for today’s technology-driven world.

At a time when the five most valuable companies on the planet are high-tech firms and nearly half of Americans say they cannot live without their cell phones, Troublemakers reveals the untold story of how we got here. This is the gripping tale of seven exceptional men and women, pioneers of Silicon Valley in the 1970s and early 1980s. Together, they worked across generations, industries, and companies to bring technology from Pentagon offices and university laboratories to the rest of us. In doing so, they changed the world.

In Troublemakers: The Story of Silicon Valley's Coming of Age, historian Leslie Berlin introduces the people and stories behind the birth of the Internet and the microprocessor, as well as Apple, Atari, Genentech, Xerox PARC, ROLM, ASK, and the iconic venture capital firms Sequoia Capital and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. In the space of only seven years and thirty-five miles, five major industries—personal computing, video games, biotechnology, modern venture capital, and advanced semiconductor logic—were born.

Featured among well-known Silicon Valley innovators like Steve Jobs, Regis McKenna, Larry Ellison, and Don Valentine are Mike Markkula, the underappreciated chairman of Apple who owned one-third of the company; Bob Taylor, who kick-started the Arpanet and masterminded the personal computer; software entrepreneur Sandra Kurtzig, the first woman to take a technology company public; Bob Swanson, the co-founder of Genentech; Al Alcorn, the Atari engineer behind the first wildly successful video game; Fawn Alvarez, who rose from an assembler on a factory line to the executive suite; and Niels Reimers, the Stanford administrator who changed how university innovations reach the public. Together, these troublemakers rewrote the rules and invented the future.

Join us as Leslie Berlin sits down with Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to discuss her new book Troublemakers, a rich narrative of Silicon Valley’s birth and coming of age and the hidden figures behind the technologies that changed your life.


This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory. We are pleased to have Books Inc. onsite selling copies of Troublemakers: The Story of Silicon Valley's Coming of Age before and after the program.

About the Exponential Center @CHM
This event is produced by the Exponential Center @CHM. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.