Upcoming Events

Sep 22, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Sep 28, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
AI and Social Good
Facebook Director of AI Research Yann LeCun, Google Principal Scientist Greg Corrado & Microsoft Technical Fellow Eric Horvitz
AI is often mentioned as a driver of high-tech products and services. However, engineers and technology experts competing for the hearts and minds of consumers are not the only ones interested in the potential of artificial intelligence. AI scientists are joining with experts and practitioners in education, medicine, public health, sustainability, housing, and other fields to address long-standing societal challenges. In collaboration with the Partnership on Artificial Intelligence, CHM Live presents a conversation with Facebook Director of AI Research Yann LeCun, Google Principal Scientist Greg Corrado, and Microsoft Technical Fellow and Director of Microsoft Research Labs Eric Horvitz.
We often hear about the promise of AI for creating new kinds of products and services. Less known are efforts to harness AI for societal good. AI scientists are joining with experts and practitioners in education, medicine, public health, sustainability, housing, and other fields to address long-standing social and societal challenges. We will focus on answers to this question, surveying current efforts and reflecting about the longer-term promise of AI for social good.

In collaboration with the Partnership on Artificial Intelligence, CHM Live presents a conversation with Facebook Director of AI Research Yann LeCun, Google Principal Scientist Greg Corrado, and Director of Microsoft Research Labs Eric Horvitz.

This event is the second in a two-part series focusing on the impact and implications of artificial intelligence for our society.

This will be streamed live on our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/computerhistory.
Sep 29, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Oct 6, 2017 5:00 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
Science Slam: The Future of AI & Computing
Series of Short Presentations from IBM Researchers
We’re teaming up with IBM Research to explore the future of computer science in the era of artificial intelligence and machine learning. Through a series of short, informal presentations, you will meet both well-established & up-and-coming IBM researchers as they share their passion for changing the world as we know it. By applying computer science to AI in new and creative ways, these scientists are changing a wide range of industries, from art to chemistry to human intelligence.
We’re teaming up with IBM Research to explore the future of computer science in the era of artificial intelligence and machine learning. Through a series of short, informal presentations, you will meet both well-established & up-and-coming IBM researchers as they share their passion for changing the world as we know it. By applying computer science to AI in new and creative ways, these scientists are changing a wide range of industries, from art to chemistry to human intelligence.

Speakers:
Jeff Welser, Vice President and Lab Director, IBM Research - Almaden “Computer Science’s Role in Silicon Valley”

Martha Sanchez, Research Staff Member, IBM Research – Almaden “Material Characterization and Device Fabrication”

Dan Gruhl, Distinguished Research Staff Member, IBM Research – Almaden “Cognitive Intelligence Augmentation Research”

Yunyao Li, Research Manger, IBM Research – Almaden “Scalable Natural Language Processing”

Raphael Arar, Designer and Researcher, IBM Research - Almaden, Forbes 30 under 30 2017 "How Art Shapes Computer and User Experiences"

Gavin Jones, Computational Chemist, IBM Research - Almaden, Foreign Policy's Global Innovator Award 2016 "Reinventing Environmental Chemistry with Cognitive Computing Tools"

Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy dinner at Off the Grid’s street food market and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits are open from 5 to 9 p.m.

Oct 10, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Understanding Computer
Google VP and Engineering Fellow Dr. Fernando Pereira in Conversation with Museum Historian John Markoff
Dr. Fernando Pereira needs you to talk to your phone. The Google VP and Engineering Fellow is relying on user interaction with products like the Pixel Phone and Google Home to conduct research that could change the way our devices understand us. His team is the brains behind Google Assistant, a software tool powered by machine learning that depends on large amounts of user data to train and improve itself. Dr. Pereira’s end goal is for computers to derive meaning from text—in other words, he wants to teach your phone how to read emails or listen to voice commands and actually understand the content. Dr. Pereira joins us to explain how he’s teaching computers to understand context in language—and his vision for a future where our devices can act upon it.
At Google’s annual developer conference in 2016, the search giant unveiled Google Assistant, an AI-powered robot that many compared to Apple’s Siri or Amazon’s Alexa. However, Google hopes that Assistant will be far more capable than making reservations and playing your favorite songs on command. Since its launch, the tool has quietly collected data from the millions of users who regularly use it. Through machine learning, the software is capable of training itself to understand the words users are saying and even how the physical world works.

What are some of the biggest challenges with teaching a machine to extract meaning from our everyday voice and text commands? How are neural networks being used to show devices the complexities and limitations of the human language? Google VP and Engineering Fellow Dr. Fernando Pereira, who currently leads projects in natural language understanding, believes the answers to these questions will allow him to further create a virtual assistant equipped with the ability to do anything you ask.

Join us for a conversation with Dr. Fernando Pereira about Google Assistant and his vision for the future of intelligent computing.

Dr. Fernando Pereira joined Google in 2008 after leaving his post as the chair of the Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania. He received a PhD in artificial intelligence from the University of Edinburgh in 1982. He has several patents and over 120 research publications on computational linguistics, machine learning, bioinformatics, speech recognition, and logic programming.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Oct 13, 2017 6:30 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Graphic Means: A History of Graphic Design Production
Film Screening
Please join us for this special screening of Graphic Means: A History of Graphic Design Production, hosted by Friday Nights @CHM. This documentary follows the evolution of graphic design production from the 1950s to the 1990s, from linecaster to photocomposition, and from paste-up to PDF.
It’s been roughly 30 years since the desktop computer revolutionized the way the graphic design industry works. For decades before that, it was the hands of industrious workers, and various ingenious machines and tools that brought type and image together on meticulously prepared paste-up boards, before they were sent to the printer.

Graphic Means: A History of Graphic Design Production explores graphic design production of the 1950s through the 1990s—from linecaster to photocomposition, and from paste-up to PDF. Join us for a special screening.

Watch the trailer.
Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy dinner at Off the Grid’s street food market and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits are open from 5 to 9 p.m.
Oct 18, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Putting A New World In Your Hands: The Impact Of The iPhone on Our Economy and Society
Veteran technology writers Steven Levy and John Markoff in conversation with 5 thought leaders
In the past decade iPhone and the ensuing smartphone revolution have altered our world more thoroughly than any previous computer generation. They have reached more than half the world’s population and have changed the way we communicate, travel, work, entertain ourselves and even sleep. To close the iPhone 360 event series, on October 18th veteran technology writers Steven Levy and John Markoff will host...
In the past decade iPhone and the ensuing smartphone revolution have altered our world more thoroughly than any previous computer generation. They have reached more than half the world’s population and have changed the way we communicate, travel, work, entertain ourselves and even sleep. To close the iPhone 360 event series, on October 18th veteran technology writers Steven Levy and John Markoff will host two panels on the impact of the iPhone.

The smartphone revolution has brought new economic freedoms— gig economy workers can now easily sell their labor to the Ubers and the Lyfts of the world without constraint. It has catalyzed a trillion dollar app economy with more than 3 billion users. At the same time, the iPhone has made it possible for a new class of monopolists such as Facebook and Google to reach the entire world’s population at virtually no cost. Levy will lead a conversation with Benedict Evans, author on how “mobile is eating the world” and Partner at venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, and Bertrand Schmitt, Co-Founder and CEO of App Annie, about how the iPhone has remade the business world.

Smartphones have truly leveled the education playing field on a global scale — a young schoolchild in the most remote village of Africa can have equal access to knowledge to that of a freshman at Stanford or Harvard. Simultaneously they have enabled a global panopticon on a scale that George Orwell never dreamed of. The iPhone can literally monitor every step you take. Markoff will moderate a discussion with Cindy Cohn, executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Jean-Louis Gassée, a former Apple executive and venture capitalist, and Judy Wacjman, a sociologist at the London School of Economics, focused on the way the iPhone has transformed our culture.

This will be streamed live on our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/computerhistory. About iPhone 360
The iPhone 360 explores the story of iPhone, from its prehistory, inception, and launch, to its evolution and impact. Coinciding with the 10th anniversary year of the iPhone launch in 2007, iPhone 360 includes integrated initiatives across the Computer History Museum to create new collections of artifacts and oral histories, scholarly research and insights, dynamic events, and educational content and curriculum.


About the Exponential Center
This event is produced by CHM's Exponential Center. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Oct 20, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Oct 27, 2017 5:00 PM Community Events
Friday Nights @CHM
Eat, Drink & Be Techie
Kick Off Your Weekend with Friday Nights @CHM
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night.
Friday Nights @CHM is offering you a whole new way to experience the Computer History Museum.

CHM is now open after hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and we're hosting the techiest block party in Silicon Valley, featuring innovative curbside cuisine and live music from Off the Grid, patio festivities at our Cloud Bistro beer garden, and special live programming on select Fridays for visitors of all ages.

As a special thank you to our Mountain View community, Friday Nights @CHM is partnering with the City of Mountain View to offer Mountain View residents and businesses free admission to all Museum exhibits every Friday night, from 5 to 9 p.m. Bring your proof of Mountain View residency or employee badge to enjoy free Museum admission. This offer is good from July 7 through October 27.

Join CHM and the Silicon Valley community for Friday Nights @CHM and discover something new! On select Fridays, enjoy interactive, tech-themed programming, including film screenings, trivia nights, talks and lectures, demos, and much more! Continue to check our events listings for special Friday Nights @CHM programming.
Nov 7, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Wonder Women: Entrepreneurship, Machine Learning, and Education
In Conversation with Calico Chief Computing Officer Daphne Koller and GoldieBlox Co-founder Debra Sterling
Two innovative entrepreneurs share how they use technology and learning to expand the frontiers of bodies and minds. Calico Chief Computing Officer Daphne Koller and GoldieBlox Co-founder Debra Sterling join Exponential Center Executive Director Marguerite Gong Hancock to discuss their work improving health and empowering girls. Join us as Koller and Sterling share their stories and offer insights into what the future holds for all of us.
It takes hard work, hard science, and hard-core commitment to change the world. But Calico Chief Computing Officer Daphne Koller and GoldieBlox CEO and Co-founder Debra Sterling are doing it. These technologists turned entrepreneurs are creating building blocks for achieving healthier lives and empowering girls to meet their potential.

As CCO at Calico, Daphne Koller teaches computers how to learn from biological data to deliver personalized medicine. Prior to this, she co-founded Coursera, a company revolutionizing global education through universal online access. A leader in machine learning and probabilistic modeling, Koller was recognized as one of Fast Company’s Most Creative People in 2014.

Engineer Debbie Sterling is on a mission to disrupt the “pink aisle” in toy stores globally. Her award-winning children’s multimedia company, GoldieBlox, challenges gender stereotypes with the world’s first girl engineer character. She was recently added to Fortune magazine’s 40 Under 40 list.

Koller and Sterling were both named Presidential Ambassadors for Global Entrepreneurship by President Obama for their entrepreneurial leadership in education. Join us as Koller and Sterling share their stories and offer insights into what the future holds for all of us.
Nov 15, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Future of War
Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick in Conversation with the New York Times' Nicole Perlroth
How is the US government using technology to protect its citizens—and prosecute hackers? How have policy initiatives in this area changed as hacks have intensified? And what does national cybersecurity policy look like under President Donald Trump?

Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick joins us to consider these questions and more.
In 2012, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta warned that the US was at risk of a “cyber Pearl Harbor.” He pointed to rapid technological advancement in aggressor nations like China, Russia, and Iran, and cited security holes in American transportation, financial, and government systems.

Panetta’s statements came one year or more prior to state-sponsored attacks on the United States Office of Personnel Management, the State Department, Sony, the New York Times, Google, and many others. In the five years after Panetta’s dire comments, it has become clear that cyber threats are no longer just the work of teenagers in parents’ basements or even organized crime groups.

How is the US government using technology to protect its citizens—and prosecute hackers? How have policy initiatives in this area changed as hacks have intensified? How is the government working with the private sector to prevent attacks? And what does national cybersecurity policy look like under President Donald Trump?

Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick joins us to consider these questions and more. Endgame is a next-generation endpoint security software company that automates the hunt for the most advanced cyber threats. He is also an operating partner at Bessemer Venture Partners, where he works with management teams to build durable companies. Before joining Endgame, Nate was CEO of the Center for a New American Security, a national security research organization. He served as a Marine Corps infantry and reconnaissance officer, including combat tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. His book about that experience, One Bullet Away, was a New York Times bestseller, a Washington Post "Best Book of the Year," and one of the Military Times "Best Military Books of the Decade."

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Nov 30, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Imagineers of War
Author Sharon Weinberger in Conversation with Museum Historian John Markoff
From Agent Orange to Predator drones, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has developed some of the world’s most infamous warfare technologies. Today, the agency’s work is at the forefront of innovation in robotics and autonomous driving. How has DARPA played such a quiet—yet impactful—role in the development of both military and civilian technology?

Join us as Sharon Weinberger shares her most riveting findings about DARPA’s history and her vision for its future.
From Agent Orange to Predator drones, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has developed some of the world’s most infamous warfare technologies. However, this testing ground for solving the Pentagon’s biggest challenges has also created digital tools we rely on daily, like the internet and graphical user interfaces. Today, the agency’s work is at the forefront of innovation in robotics and autonomous driving. How has DARPA played such a quiet—yet impactful—role in the development of both military and civilian technology?

Journalist and author Sharon Weinberger’s newest book, The Imagineers of War: The Untold Story of DARPA, is a comprehensive look at the history and modern impact of DARPA. She follows the agency from its founding in response to the Sputnik launch in 1958 to its recent success in self-driving cars. Weinberger’s account is drawn from interviews with dozens of Pentagon and DARPA officials (many of whom have never been interviewed about their work before), as well as public records obtained through the Freedom of Information Act.

As a journalist and author covering the intersection of national security, science, and technology, Weinberger’s job is reporting on “War 2.0.” She is the national security editor at The Intercept and the author of Imaginary Weapons: A Journey Through the Pentagon’s Scientific Underworld. She is currently a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Weinberger has written about military science and technology for Nature, BBC, Discover, Slate, Wired, and The Washington Post, among others.

Join us as Sharon Weinberger shares her most riveting findings about DARPA’s history and her vision for its future.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.

Dec 6, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Programmed Inequality
Dr. Marie Hicks in Conversation with the Museum's Center for Software History Director David C. Brock
In her book, Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing, author and historian Dr. Marie Hicks explores how changing gender discrimination, labor demographics, and government policy led to the UK’s rise and fall as a leader in computing. She also explains how Britain’s lag in technological progress had detrimental economic effects on the UK—and why the US may be facing the same risks today.

Dr. Marie Hicks sits down with David C. Brock, Director of the Museum’s Center for Software History, to share insights from her book.
According to the National Center for Women & Information Technology, women held just 25 percent of professional computing jobs in the US in 2015. How damaging is this gender gap to the future of the tech industry?

The rise and fall of Britain’s electronic computing industry between 1944–1974 holds clues. In her book, Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing, historian Marie Hicks explores how gender discrimination, changing labor demographics, and government policy during this 30-year period shaped the UK’s path in computing. She also explains how this path had detrimental economic effects on the UK—and why the US may be facing similar risks today.

Dr. Marie Hicks sits down with David C. Brock, Director of the Museum’s Center for Software History, to share insights from her book.

Hicks received her BA from Harvard University and her MA and PhD from Duke University. Before entering academia, she worked as a UNIX systems administrator. She is currently an assistant professor of history at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. Her work focuses on how gender and sexuality bring hidden technological dynamics to light and how women’s experiences change the core narratives of the history of computing.


This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
The Programmed Inequality event is co-produced by the Museum's Center for Software History, which collects, preserves, interprets, and presents to the world the history of software and its ongoing impact on global society.