Upcoming Events

Jan 31, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Inside the Transformation
Driving Change
Uber Chief Brand Officer Bozoma Saint John in Conversation with the Verge's Senior Technology Editor Lauren Goode
After a year of challenges and controversies, Uber is turning to Bozoma Saint John to upgrade its image. Hired in June 2017 as the company’s Chief Brand Officer, Saint John is tasked with telling the stories of its millions of riders and drivers across 600 cities. A seasoned advertising and marketing executive, Saint John has held leadership roles at Apple Music and Pepsi. She sits down with the Verge's Senior Technology Editor Lauren Goode to discuss her background and career, the challenges she’s facing as she leads the effort to change Uber’s image and insights about the future of the ride-sharing company.
2017 was a year of challenges and controversies for Uber. In February, former engineer Susan Fowler published a blog post describing the sexual harassment and gender bias she faced at the company, causing Uber to launch an investigation of its culture. Google’s self-driving car unit, Waymo, sued Uber for alleged intellectual property theft. The New York Times published an expose detailing how Uber used a software tool called “greyball” to elude law enforcement in cities where the ridesharing service was limited or banned. Many senior executives left the company, culminating in the resignation of longtime CEO and cofounder Travis Kalanick in June.

Now the company is turning to Bozoma Saint John to upgrade its image. Hired in June 2017 as the company’s Chief Brand Officer, Saint John is tasked with telling the stories of its millions of riders and drivers across 600 cities. A seasoned advertising and marketing executive, Saint John has held leadership roles at Apple Music and Pepsi. She sits down with the Verge's Senior Technology Editor Lauren Goode to discuss her background and career, the challenges she’s facing as she leads the effort to change Uber’s image and insights about the future of the ride-sharing company. This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Feb 15, 2018 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Inside the Transformation
Our Brain’s Development in a Technological World
In Conversation with Neuroscientist Adam Gazzaley, Professor Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, and Research Psychologist Larry Rosen
What happens to the brain throughout our lives when you replace tangible experiences with technological ones? When we switch physical books with Kindles and iPads? Or regularly multitask between responding to emails on the computer and texts on our smartphones? As computing becomes increasingly pervasive in our lives, we will discuss the possible benefits and potential detriments technology has on cognitive development.
The brain is composed of about 100 billion unconnected neurons when we are born. As we grow, our early experiences - hearing caregivers’ voices during infancy, solving simple puzzles, reading books before bedtime- determine the neurological connections and pathways that are formed. Neuroscientists believe the majority of essential brain development occurs in the initial years of a child’s life. However, cognitive growth takes place throughout our entire lives, including the loss of unused connections throughout adolescence or the creation of new neural connections in an adult brain when learning a new skill.

So, what happens to the brain throughout our lives when you replace tangible experiences with technological ones? When we switch physical books with Kindles and iPads? Or regularly multitask between responding to emails on the computer and texts on our smartphones? As computing becomes increasingly pervasive in our lives, we will discuss the possible benefits and potential detriments technology has on cognitive development.

Join us as the Mercury News science reporter Lisa Krieger leads a conversation with experts in neuroscience, education, and psychology to explore how the consumption of technology is impacting our brain.
This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Feb 23, 2018 6:30 PM Speaker Series
Friday Nights @CHM
The Commodore Story
Film Screening and Audience Q&A with Filmmakers
The Commodore Story is a 2 hour documentary film that takes audiences through Commodore's world-changing evolution from the 70's to the 90's; from the PET, Vic20, C64 to the Amiga and beyond. The film includes interviews with many legends from the Commodore and Amiga years including Bil Herd, Leonard Tramiel, Dave Haynie and many others. You will also see footage of the very rare C65 and learn more about the wave of new Commodore-related products that are hitting the market today. Join us for this special screening followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers.
The Commodore Story is a 2 hour documentary film that takes audiences through Commodore's world-changing evolution from the 70's to the 90's; from the PET, Vic20, C64 to the Amiga and beyond. The film includes interviews with many legends from the Commodore and Amiga years including Bil Herd, Leonard Tramiel, Dave Haynie and many others. You will also see footage of the very rare C65 and learn more about the wave of new Commodore-related products that are hitting the market today. Join us for this special screening followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers.
Feb 28, 2018 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live | Technically Speaking
Press Play: The Origins of QuickTime
A panel discussion with members of the original Apple QuickTime development team: Doug Camplejohn, Peter Hoddie, and Bruce Leak
Join us as Center for Software History curator Hansen Hsu leads a conversation with members of the original QuickTime team about the creation of QuickTime, its evolution, and its impact on the computer and media industries.
From Hollywood blockbusters to social media cat videos, the ability to record, edit and play video on mobile devices and personal computers has changed the way we consume and produce moving images. 25 years ago, this technology was in its infancy. In 1991, Apple released QuickTime, the first mass-market digital video software for personal computers. QuickTime is a multimedia platform for developers to add audiovisual recording, editing, and playback to their applications. Because it was built into the Macintosh operating system, users did not need to buy more hardware or software to play video. QuickTime became the most widespread media format on PCs after Apple brought it to Windows, and its incorporation into the MPEG-4 standard, used in every cell phone, computer, and set top video player today, cemented Apple’s position as a leading provider of media creation technology. How was QuickTime created? What role did it play in Apple’s history? And what impact does it have today?

Join us as Center for Software History curator Hansen Hsu leads a conversation with members of the original QuickTime team about the creation of QuickTime, its evolution, and its impact on the computer and media industries.
This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.