Upcoming Events

Mar 2, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Computing in Your Pocket
The Prehistory of the iPhone in Silicon Valley
Join us for a fascinating panel discussion with moderator John Markoff, a Computer History Museum Historian, who reported on the era for the New York Times, Steve Capps, who led the development of the Newton while at Apple Computer; Donna Dubinsky, former president & CEO of Palm, Inc. and co-founder & former CEO of Handspring; Jerry Kaplan, founder of Go Corp.; and Marc Porat, co-founder and former chief executive of General Magic.
Two decades before Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone, a handful of engineers and designers began exploring the idea of handheld computers in Silicon Valley. In 1987, beginning with the then-secret Newton Project inside Apple and with a mobile pen-based computer at Go Corp., a range of handheld computing ideas began to bubble-up all around the Valley. Before long, inside Apple there were prototypes like Swatch and Pen Mac, and the Pocket Crystal idea which would be spun out in 1990 as General Magic. Shortly afterwards, in 1992, Palm Computing was founded. The race was on to reinvent computing and make it even more personal.

Join us for a fascinating panel discussion with moderator John Markoff, a Computer History Museum Historian, who reported on the era for the New York Times, Steve Capps, who led the development of the Newton while at Apple Computer; Donna Dubinsky, former president & CEO of Palm, Inc. and co-founder & former CEO of Handspring; Jerry Kaplan, founder of Go Corp.; and Marc Porat, co-founder and former chief executive of General Magic.

Before the program take a mini-tour of the Mobile Computing Gallery in Revolution with Marc Weber, Curatorial Director of the Museum’s Internet History Program. Weber curated the gallery and will show key milestones related to the evening’s event, from the Apple Newton to the first smartphone to bring the mobile Web to the masses – in 1990s Japan! Space is limited so please email Sara Baechler to reserve a spot.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory. This event is produced by CHM's Exponential Center. The Exponential Center captures the legacy—and advances the future—of entrepreneurship and innovation in Silicon Valley and around the world. The center explores the people, companies, and communities that are transforming the human experience through technology innovation, economic value creation, and social impact.
Mar 9, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Hunting for Space Treasure
Planetary Resources CEO Chris Lewicki in Conversation with John Hollar
Planetary Resources is developing technology that could enable humans to fly spacecraft to asteroids and mine minerals that could be worth millions of dollars. The company is backed by luminaries like Larry Page and Richard Branson and raised $21 million in May 2016.

Join us as CEO Chris Lewicki sits down with Museum CEO John Hollar.
Forget Silicon Valley: could outer space be the next place to make your fortune?

Planetary Resources is developing technology that could enable humans to fly spacecraft to asteroids and mine minerals that could be worth millions of dollars. The company is backed by luminaries like Larry Page and Richard Branson and raised $21 million in May.

As part of the technology, the company is working on to reach asteroids, it created an earth observation system called Ceres. This platform’s infrared and hyperspectral sensors far surpass the capability of human eyes. Through this technology, Ceres could enable more sophisticated tracking of climate change, crop growth, forest fires and many other environmental changes.

Chris Lewicki has been intimately involved with the lifecycle of NASA’s Mars Exploration Rovers and the Phoenix Mars Lander. He performed system engineering development and participated in assembly, test and launch operations for both Mars missions. He was Flight Director for the rovers Spirit and Opportunity, and the Surface Mission Manager for Phoenix. The recipient of two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals, Lewicki has an asteroid named in his honor: 13609 Lewicki. Chris holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Arizona.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Mar 24, 2017 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
I’m Sorry, Dave. I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That.
A Lecture by IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center's Grady Booch
IBM Fellow Grady Booch will explore how we take our dreams of computing machines that do the impossible and turn them into the possible, with a consideration for the limits we must overcome, from the laws of physics to the principles of design to the constraints of our very human ethical and moral frameworks.
“The limits of the possible,” said Arthur C. Clarke, “can only be defined by going beyond them into the impossible.” Our mythologies, our books, our movies have given voice to our dreams of computers that transcend human abilities; we do not lack for imagination of the impossible. In a sense, the history of computing can be seen through the lens of how our science and our engineering have yielded a continuous process of making the impossible possible. However, there are things we know we cannot do, there are some things we don’t yet know how to do, and there are some things we probably shouldn’t do.

This presentation is the next lecture in the documentary project Computing: The Human Experience. Here, we will explore how we take our dreams of computing machines that do the impossible and turn them into the possible, with a consideration for the limits we must overcome, from the laws of physics to the principles of design to the constraints of our very human ethical and moral frameworks.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Apr 6, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Driving Disruption
Uber CEO Travis Kalanick in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
As Uber has grown over the last six years, it has transformed how millions of people in hundreds of cities across the globe move every day. Founded in 2009, the transportation app now has 40 million monthly users in more than 450 cities around the world.

Join us as CEO Travis Kalanick shares the growth story of Uber as well as his vision for the future of urban mobility.​
As Uber has grown over the last six years, it has transformed how millions of people in hundreds of cities across the globe move every day. Founded in 2009, the transportation app now has 40 million monthly users in more than 450 cities around the world. The company’s explosive growth has presented unique challenges and questions for taxi companies, transportation & labor regulators, law enforcement officials, and commuters from San Francisco to Tokyo.

The company is also offering food delivery, exploring autonomous vehicle technology, experimenting with artificial intelligence, and providing transportation data to urban planners and the public. As it looks to the future, Uber says it aims to create a world where people have equal access to affordable transportation; spend less of their income on cars or commutes, and less time stuck behind the wheel; and where parking spaces are replaced by parks and affordable housing.

Join us as CEO Travis Kalanick shares the growth story of Uber as well as his vision for the future of urban mobility.​

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Apr 19, 2017 6:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Venture Capital in the Blood
Three Generations of Drapers in Silicon Valley
Join us with Exponential’s Marguerite Gong Hancock in Conversation with Draper Richard Kaplan Co-chair Bill Draper, DFJ Founding Partner Tim Draper, and Halogen Ventures Founding Partner Jesse Draper.
The Draper family has played a defining role in Silicon Valley venture capital for four generations, spanning 60 years. Guiding entrepreneurs from idea to exit, Drapers have served as investors, mentors, match-makers, and allies to founders of Hotmail, Skype, Baidu, Apollo Computer, Tesla and more.

The Draper VC dynasty began in 1958. General William Draper founded Draper, Gaither & Anderson, one of the first professional venture capital firms on the west coast. His son Bill co-founded Draper & Johnson then Sutter Hill Ventures, before starting Draper International, a fund focused on venture investments in India, and Draper Richards, which invests in U.S. technology companies. Bill's son, Tim, cofounded Draper Fisher Jurvetson (DFJ) in 1985. DFJ has backed tech superstars like Baidu, Space X and Tumblr.. Tim’s daughter Jesse, also known as “The Valley Girl”, continues the Draper legacy today as the founder of Halogen Ventures, an early stage VC fund focused on female-founded consumer companies.

How did the Drapers catch--and pass on--the venture capital bug? What lessons have these investors learned from each other? What does the future of VC look like in Silicon Valley and around the world? Join us for stories and insights from three generations of Drapers.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
May 4, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
From Screen Queen to Imaging Innovator
Mary Lou Jepsen in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Mary Lou Jepsen has lead Facebook’s virtual reality efforts, advised Google’s Sergey Brin and invented $100 laptops. Now she is turning her consumer electronics experience to the task of curing disease. Jepsen's goal with her new company OpnWatr.io is to shrink today’s massive MRI machines into wearable devices that continuously scan the body.
Mary Lou Jepsen has lead Facebook’s virtual reality efforts, advised Google’s Sergey Brin and invented $100 laptops. Now she is turning her consumer electronics experience to the task of curing disease.

After decades of working in display divisions at some of Silicon Valley’s biggest companies, her goal is to shrink today’s massive MRI machines into wearable devices that continuously scan the body. Jepsen’s new company, OpnWatr.io, is developing technology that uses the way the body scatters infrared light to develop high resolution images equal to those produced by MRI. This is enabled by novel LCDs with pixels small enough to create holographic images, coupled with the use of body-temperature detectors and complex software. These LCDs are small and light enough that they could line a beanie or a bandage. The implications of a wearable body imaging system are significant for detecting and treating cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and even mental illnesses.

Join us as Mary Lou Jepsen discusses her Silicon Valley history, her company on the cutting edge of tech and medicine and her vision for the future of body imaging and healthcare. Until mid-2016 she led advanced consumer electronics and virtual reality at Facebook and Oculus. Previously she had a similar role at Google and Google [x], where she was also a close advisor to Sergey Brin. She co-founded One Laptop per Child (OLPC) with Nicholas Negroponte, and was the lead inventor and architect of the $100 laptop. She holds a PhD in optical physics and an ScB in electrical engineering both from Brown University as well as an ScM in computational holography from the MIT Media Lab. She is an inventor on over 100 published or issued patents.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Jun 8, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Engineering Emotional Intelligence
Affectiva CEO Rana el Kaliouby in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
What could your computer or phone do if it knew how you were feeling? Through a combination of psychology, technology, and cognitive science, one startup is bringing emotional intelligence to the digital world. Affectiva has developed new artificial intelligence that allows machines to not only read your feelings, but also react to them.

Join us as Dr. Rana el Kaliouby, Affectiva CEO and co-founder, shares how the company’s technology was invented, the creative ways the software is being used, and her vision for the future of emotion-aware computing.
What could your computer or phone do if it knew how you were feeling? Through a combination of psychology, technology, and cognitive science, one startup is bringing emotional intelligence to the digital world. Affectiva has developed new artificial intelligence that allows machines to not only read your feelings, but also react to them. Spun out of the MIT Media Lab, the company has developed sophisticated face and emotion algorithms that can detect even the most nuanced expressions with a high degree of accuracy. This technology is trained and tested by incorporating information from Affectiva’s emotional data repository of 4.8 million faces from 75 different countries, amounting to more than 50 billion emotion data points.

Affectiva’s software is already in the hands of developers, content creators, market researchers, and advertisers, who are using it to learn more about how audiences react to products. Companies like Unilever, CBS, Kellogg, and Mars are current customers.

Join us as Dr. Rana el Kaliouby, Affectiva CEO and co-founder, shares how the company’s technology was invented, the creative ways the software is being used, and her vision for the future of emotion-aware computing. Prior to starting the company, Rana worked as a scientist at MIT, leading efforts to apply emotion-sensing technology to mental health and autism research. Rana is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. Rana holds a BSc and MSc in computer science from the American University in Cairo and a PhD from the computer laboratory at the University of Cambridge.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Aug 24, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Technology, Health & Equality
Dr. Anthony Iton in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
In an age of sophisticated healthcare technologies and research tools, the doctors you see or hospitals you visit are only a small part of what determines your health. Through extensive research and data analysis, one doctor has found that your zip code may matter more to your well-being than your genetic code.

Join us for a conversation about how data helped Dr. Anthony Iton identify this problem—and the role technology can play in solving it.
In an age of sophisticated healthcare technologies and research tools, the doctors you see or hospitals you visit are only a small part of what determines your health. Through extensive research and data analysis, one doctor has found that your zip code may matter more to your well-being than your genetic code.

Dr. Anthony Iton first witnessed the link between health and socio-economic status as a Johns Hopkins medical student working in East Baltimore at the height of the crack and AIDS epidemics. This connection became more clear in his role as the director of the Public Health Department for Alameda County. As the person responsible for signing the county’s thousands of death certificates, Dr. Iton started to notice patterns in the ages, causes of death, ethnicities, and zip codes of the deceased. Since then, he has dedicated his career to researching these correlations across the country. Today, Dr. Iton is focused on improving health conditions in 14 low-income communities throughout California as the senior vice president of the California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities initiative.

Join us for a conversation about how data helped Dr. Iton identify this problem—and the role technology can play in solving it.

Prior to his appointment at The Endowment and his position at the Alameda County Public Health Department, Iton also served for three years as director of Health and Human Services and School Medical Advisor for the City of Stamford, Connecticut. Concurrent to that, he also served as a physician in internal medicine for Stamford Hospital's HIV Clinic. Additionally, Iton served for five years as a primary care physician for the San Francisco Department of Public Health.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Nov 15, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Future of War
Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
How is the US government using technology to protect its citizens—and prosecute hackers? How have policy initiatives in this area changed as hacks have intensified? And what does national cybersecurity policy look like under President Donald Trump?

Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick joins us to consider these questions and more.
In 2012, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta warned that the US was at risk of a “cyber Pearl Harbor.” He pointed to rapid technological advancement in aggressor nations like China, Russia, and Iran and cited security holes in American transportation, financial, and government systems.

Panetta’s statements came one year or more prior to state-sponsored attacks on the US. Office of Personnel Management, the State Department, Sony, the New York Times, Google, and many others. In the five years after Panetta’s dire comments, it has become clear cyber threats are no longer just the work of teenagers in parents’ basements or even organized crime groups.

How is the US government using technology to protect its citizens—and prosecute hackers? How have policy initiatives in this area changed as hacks have intensified? How is the government working with the private sector to prevent attacks? And what does national cybersecurity policy look like under President Donald Trump?

Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick joins us to consider these questions and more. Endgame is a next-generation endpoint security software company that automates the hunt for the most advanced cyber threats. He is also an operating partner at Bessemer Venture Partners, where he works with management teams to build durable companies. Before joining Endgame, Nate was CEO of the Center for a New American Security, a national security research organization. He served as a Marine Corps infantry and reconnaissance officer, including combat tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. His book about that experience, One Bullet Away, was a New York Times bestseller, a Washington Post "Best Book of the Year," and one of the Military Times "Best Military Books of the Decade."

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.