Upcoming Events

May 4, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
From Screen Queen to Imaging Innovator
Openwater CEO Mary Lou Jepsen in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Mary Lou Jepsen has lead Facebook’s virtual reality efforts, advised Google’s Sergey Brin and invented $100 laptops. Now she is turning her consumer electronics experience to the task of curing disease. Jepsen's goal with her new company Openwater is to shrink today’s massive MRI machines into wearable devices that continuously scan the body.
Mary Lou Jepsen has lead Facebook’s virtual reality efforts, advised Google’s Sergey Brin and invented $100 laptops. Now she is turning her consumer electronics experience to the task of curing disease.

After decades of working in display divisions at some of Silicon Valley’s biggest companies, her goal is to shrink today’s massive MRI machines into wearable devices that continuously scan the body. Jepsen’s new company, Openwater, is developing technology that uses the way the body scatters infrared light to develop high resolution images equal to those produced by an MRI. This is enabled by novel LCDs with pixels small enough to create holographic images, coupled with the use of body-temperature detectors and complex software. These LCDs are small and light enough that they could line a beanie or a bandage. The implications of a wearable body imaging system are significant for detecting and treating cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and even mental illnesses.

Join us as Mary Lou Jepsen discusses her Silicon Valley history, her company on the cutting edge of tech and medicine, and her vision for the future of body imaging and healthcare. Until mid-2016 she led advanced consumer electronics and virtual reality at Facebook and Oculus. Previously she had a similar role at Google and Google [x], where she was also a close advisor to Sergey Brin. She co-founded One Laptop per Child (OLPC) with Nicholas Negroponte, and was the lead inventor and architect of the $100 laptop. She holds a PhD in optical physics and an ScB in electrical engineering both from Brown University as well as an ScM in computational holography from the MIT Media Lab. She is an inventor on over 100 published or issued patents.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
May 19, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Big Data Gets Political
Stanford University’s Dr. Michal Kosinski in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Liking your favorite musicians, restaurants, and travel destinations on Facebook may seem harmless. But each click may have played a crucial role in Donald Trump’s victory and the UK’s vote to leave the European Union.

Join us as Stanford University’s Dr. Michal Kosinski discusses how big data is being used in politics and what it could mean for the future of voting.
Liking your favorite musicians, restaurants, and travel destinations on Facebook may seem harmless. But each click may have played a crucial role in Donald Trump’s victory and the UK’s vote to leave the European Union.

Dr. Michal Kosinski turned studying Facebook likes into a science at Cambridge University’s Psychometrics Center. He and a fellow student developed a personality quiz application that encouraged users to opt into sharing their Facebook profiles. This allowed Kosinski to create a database that linked users’ Facebook likes with the personality traits they revealed by taking the quiz. In addition to discovering correlations between personality and the things users liked on Facebook, he was able to predict a user’s skin color, sexual orientation, political leanings, and even alcohol and drug use.

It didn’t take long before Kosinski’s work attracted the attention of the private sector—specifically, a big data firm that gave rise to Cambridge Analytica, the analytics company that worked with the Trump and LeaveEU campaigns. Kosinski, who had become increasingly uneasy as he started to consider the implications of his research, turned down the company’s offer to pay for access to his database. He soon learned that the company had created a copy of his data tool and was using it in the wild.

Dr. Michal Kosinski joins us to share his story—his work in psychometrics, how his big data tool works, the methods he warned against and finally, his vision for the future of data in politics and beyond.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Join us for Friday Nights @CHM before the program! Enjoy dinner at one of Off the Grid food trucks and drinks from our Cloud Bistro. Museum exhibits will also be open from 5-8pm.
Jun 1, 2017 8:15 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Forum on the Road
KQED Broadcasts Live from the Computer History Museum
Forum on the Road is back for a second series of live broadcasts across the Bay Area. In Forum's program at the Computer History Museum, host Michael Krasny will focus on issues related to technology and the Silicon Valley community, such as housing and labor.
Forum on the Road is back for a second series of live broadcasts across the Bay Area. KQED Forum host Michael Krasny is hosting on-location discussions with leaders, experts, and residents covering the big issues facing local communities. Audience members will participate in these live programs and get a behind-the-scenes look at how the show is produced.

During Forum's program at the Computer History Museum, Michael Krasny will focus on issues related to technology and the Silicon Valley community, such as housing and labor.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Jun 8, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Engineering Emotional Intelligence
Affectiva CEO Rana el Kaliouby in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
What could your computer or phone do if it knew how you were feeling? Through a combination of psychology, technology, and cognitive science, one startup is bringing emotional intelligence to the digital world. Affectiva has developed new artificial intelligence that allows machines to not only read your feelings, but also react to them.

Join us as Dr. Rana el Kaliouby, Affectiva CEO and co-founder, shares how the company’s technology was invented, the creative ways the software is being used, and her vision for the future of emotion-aware computing.
What could your computer or phone do if it knew how you were feeling? Through a combination of psychology, technology, and cognitive science, one startup is bringing emotional intelligence to the digital world. Affectiva has developed new artificial intelligence that allows machines to not only read your feelings, but also react to them. Spun out of the MIT Media Lab, the company has developed sophisticated face and emotion algorithms that can detect even the most nuanced expressions with a high degree of accuracy. This technology is trained and tested by incorporating information from Affectiva’s emotional data repository of 4.8 million faces from 75 different countries, amounting to more than 50 billion emotion data points.

Affectiva’s software is already in the hands of developers, content creators, market researchers, and advertisers, who are using it to learn more about how audiences react to products. Companies like Unilever, CBS, Kellogg, and Mars are current customers.

Join us as Dr. Rana el Kaliouby, Affectiva CEO and co-founder, shares how the company’s technology was invented, the creative ways the software is being used, and her vision for the future of emotion-aware computing. Prior to starting the company, Rana worked as a scientist at MIT, leading efforts to apply emotion-sensing technology to mental health and autism research. Rana is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. Rana holds a BSc and MSc in computer science from the American University in Cairo and a PhD from the computer laboratory at the University of Cambridge.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Jun 21, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Decoding Cancer
Cancer Genome Atlas Director Dr. Jean Claude Zenklusen in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
Not all cancers are created equal—sequences in a cancer cell’s genetic code can affect how quickly it spreads, how resistant it is to radiation, and how it turns a normal cell into a cancerous one. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) is focused on identifying, analyzing, and sharing these genetic traits. Ultimately, this information could help the medical community provide personalized treatments and more accurate diagnoses for patients.

Join us as TCGA Director Dr. Jean Claude Zenklusen discusses the role of genetics and technology in studying, treating, and preventing cancer.
Not all cancers are created equal—sequences in a cancer cell’s genetic code can affect how quickly it spreads, how resistant it is to radiation, and how it turns a normal cell into a cancerous one. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), a collaboration between the National Cancer Institute and the National Human Genome Research Institute, is focused on identifying, analyzing, and sharing these genetic traits. Ultimately, this information could help the medical community provide personalized treatments and more accurate diagnoses for patients.

As the largest-scale cancer genomics project to date, TCGA researchers have mapped key genomic changes in 33 different types of cancer, including 10 rare forms of the disease. The organization has also collected 2.5 petabytes of data describing tumor and normal tissues from more than 11,000 patients. This information is publicly available and has been used by thousands of researchers.

Join us as TCGA Director Dr. Jean Claude Zenklusen discusses the role of genetics and technology in studying, treating and preventing cancer.

Dr. Zenklusen was named director of TCGA in 2013. Prior to that, he served as the scientific program director of the Office of Cancer Genomics. He also cloned two novel tumor suppressor genes while participating in the Human Genome Project in 1996. He received his PhD in cancer biology and genetics from the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences in 1995.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Jul 11, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Why Software Matters to Government Intelligence
IARPA Director Jason Matheny in Conversation with the Museum's Center for Software History Director David C. Brock
The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), also known as “DARPA for spies,” is the science and technology research arm for the intelligence community. On behalf of the 17 organizations that comprise this community, IARPA invests in “high risk/high payoff” programs to tackle the biggest challenges in intelligence gathering and analysis.

IARPA Director Dr. Jason Matheny joins us to discuss some of the organization’s most exciting research projects, explains how IARPA approaches research investment, and tells us why software matters to the intelligence community.
The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), also known as “DARPA for spies,” is the science and technology research arm for the intelligence community in the Office of the Director for National Intelligence. On behalf of the 17 military and civilian agencies and organizations that comprise this community, IARPA invests in “high risk/high payoff” programs to tackle the biggest challenges in intelligence gathering and analysis. IARPA programs range from quantum computing and autonomous vehicles, to bioinformatics and neuroscience to machine detection of emerging technology. IARPA also sponsors prize challenges as a way to spur new ideas and projects.

IARPA Director Dr. Jason Matheny joins us to discuss some of the organization’s most exciting research projects, explains how IARPA approaches research investment, and tells us why software matters to the intelligence community.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
The Why Software Matters to Government Intelligence event is co-produced by the Museum's Center for Software History, which collects, preserves, interprets, and presents to the world the history of software and its ongoing impact on global society.
Aug 24, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Technology, Health & Equality
Dr. Anthony Iton in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
In an age of sophisticated healthcare technologies and research tools, the doctors you see or hospitals you visit are only a small part of what determines your health. Through extensive research and data analysis, one doctor has discovered that your zip code may matter more to your well-being than your genetic code.

Join us for a conversation about how data helped Dr. Anthony Iton identify this problem—and the role technology can play in solving it.
In an age of sophisticated healthcare technologies and research tools, the doctors you see or hospitals you visit are only a small part of what determines your health. Through extensive research and data analysis, one doctor has discovered that your zip code may matter more to your well-being than your genetic code.

Dr. Anthony Iton first witnessed the link between health and socio-economic status as a Johns Hopkins medical student working in East Baltimore at the height of the crack and AIDS epidemics. This connection became more clear in his role as the director of the Public Health Department for Alameda County. As the person responsible for signing the county’s thousands of death certificates, Dr. Iton started to notice patterns in the ages, causes of death, ethnicities, and zip codes of the deceased. Since then, he has dedicated his career to researching these correlations across the country. Today, Dr. Iton is focused on improving health conditions in 14 low-income communities throughout California as the senior vice president of the California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities initiative.

Join us for a conversation about how data helped Dr. Iton identify this problem—and the role technology can play in solving it.

Prior to his appointment at The California Endowment and his position at the Alameda County Public Health Department, Iton also served for three years as director of Health and Human Services and School Medical Advisor for the City of Stamford, Connecticut. Concurrent to that, he also served as a physician in internal medicine for Stamford Hospital's HIV Clinic. Additionally, Iton served for five years as a primary care physician for the San Francisco Department of Public Health.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Nov 15, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
The Future of War
Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick in Conversation with Museum CEO John Hollar
How is the US government using technology to protect its citizens—and prosecute hackers? How have policy initiatives in this area changed as hacks have intensified? And what does national cybersecurity policy look like under President Donald Trump?

Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick joins us to consider these questions and more.
In 2012, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta warned that the US was at risk of a “cyber Pearl Harbor.” He pointed to rapid technological advancement in aggressor nations like China, Russia, and Iran, and cited security holes in American transportation, financial, and government systems.

Panetta’s statements came one year or more prior to state-sponsored attacks on the United States Office of Personnel Management, the State Department, Sony, the New York Times, Google, and many others. In the five years after Panetta’s dire comments, it has become clear that cyber threats are no longer just the work of teenagers in parents’ basements or even organized crime groups.

How is the US government using technology to protect its citizens—and prosecute hackers? How have policy initiatives in this area changed as hacks have intensified? How is the government working with the private sector to prevent attacks? And what does national cybersecurity policy look like under President Donald Trump?

Endgame Inc. CEO Nathaniel Fick joins us to consider these questions and more. Endgame is a next-generation endpoint security software company that automates the hunt for the most advanced cyber threats. He is also an operating partner at Bessemer Venture Partners, where he works with management teams to build durable companies. Before joining Endgame, Nate was CEO of the Center for a New American Security, a national security research organization. He served as a Marine Corps infantry and reconnaissance officer, including combat tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. His book about that experience, One Bullet Away, was a New York Times bestseller, a Washington Post "Best Book of the Year," and one of the Military Times "Best Military Books of the Decade."

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
Nov 30, 2017 6:30 PM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Imagineers of War
Author Sharon Weinberger in Conversation with Museum Historian John Markoff
From Agent Orange to Predator drones, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has developed some of the world’s most infamous warfare technologies. Today, the agency’s work is at the forefront of innovation in robotics and autonomous driving. How has DARPA played such a quiet—yet impactful—role in the development of both military and civilian technology?

Join us as Sharon Weinberger shares her most riveting findings about DARPA’s history and her vision for its future.
From Agent Orange to Predator drones, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has developed some of the world’s most infamous warfare technologies. However, this testing ground for solving the Pentagon’s biggest challenges has also created digital tools we rely on daily, like the internet and graphical user interfaces. Today, the agency’s work is at the forefront of innovation in robotics and autonomous driving. How has DARPA played such a quiet—yet impactful—role in the development of both military and civilian technology?

Journalist and author Sharon Weinberger’s newest book, The Imagineers of War: The Untold Story of DARPA, is a comprehensive look at the history and modern impact of DARPA. She follows the agency from its founding in response to the Sputnik launch in 1958 to its recent success in self-driving cars. Weinberger’s account is drawn from interviews with dozens of Pentagon and DARPA officials (many of whom have never been interviewed about their work before), as well as public records obtained through the Freedom of Information Act.

As a journalist and author covering the intersection of national security, science, and technology, Weinberger’s job is reporting on “War 2.0.” She is the national security editor at The Intercept and the author of Imaginary Weapons: A Journey Through the Pentagon’s Scientific Underworld. She is currently a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Weinberger has written about military science and technology for Nature, BBC, Discover, Slate, Wired, and The Washington Post, among others.

Join us as Sharon Weinberger shares her most riveting findings about DARPA’s history and her vision for its future.

This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.

Dec 6, 2017 11:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Live
Programmed Inequality
Dr. Marie Hicks in Conversation with the Museum's Center for Software History Director David C. Brock
In her book, Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing, author and historian Dr. Marie Hicks explores how changing gender discrimination, labor demographics, and government policy led to the UK’s rise and fall as a leader in computing. She also explains how Britain’s lag in technological progress had detrimental economic effects on the UK—and why the US may be facing the same risks today.

Dr. Marie Hicks sits down with David C. Brock, Director of the Museum’s Center for Software History, to share insights from her book.
According to the National Center for Women & Information Technology, women held just 25 percent of professional computing jobs in the US in 2015. How damaging is this gender gap to the future of the tech industry?

The rise and fall of Britain’s electronic computing industry between 1944–1974 holds clues. In her book, Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing, historian Marie Hicks explores how gender discrimination, changing labor demographics, and government policy during this 30-year period shaped the UK’s path in computing. She also explains how this path had detrimental economic effects on the UK—and why the US may be facing similar risks today.

Dr. Marie Hicks sits down with David C. Brock, Director of the Museum’s Center for Software History, to share insights from her book.

Hicks received her BA from Harvard University and her MA and PhD from Duke University. Before entering academia, she worked as a UNIX systems administrator. She is currently an assistant professor of history at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. Her work focuses on how gender and sexuality bring hidden technological dynamics to light and how women’s experiences change the core narratives of the history of computing.


This event will be streamed live on our Facebook page: facebook.com/computerhistory.
The Programmed Inequality event is co-produced by the Museum's Center for Software History, which collects, preserves, interprets, and presents to the world the history of software and its ongoing impact on global society.