Upcoming Events

May 5, 2015 7:00 PM Speaker Series
CHM Presents Revolutionaries
The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace & Babbage Author Sydney Padua in Conversation with Google Doodle Leader Ryan Germick
Sydney Padua in Conversation with Google Doodle Leader Ryan Germick
Sydney Padua is a graphic artist and animator. Sydney wrote this “Steampunk” graphic novel based on thorough research on the biographies and correspondence between Babbage and Lovelace, as well as other bits of early Victoriana, which is then twisted for humorous effect. Ryan Germick, our moderator, first graced the Museum’s stage in 2012 as a panel participant in The Art & Technology of Google Doodles Revolutionaries program. His pairing with Sydney will most definitely result in a thrilling and adventurous evening you won’t want to miss. Please join us.
A graphic novel debut that transforms a compelling scientific collaboration into an unexpected -- and hilarious -- series of adventures.

Meet Victorian London’s most dynamic duo: Charles Babbage, the unrealized inventor of the computer, and his accomplice, Ada, Countess of Lovelace, the peculiar protoprogrammer and daughter of Lord Byron. When Lovelace translated a description of Babbage’s plans for an enormous mechanical calculating machine in 1842, she added annotations three times longer than the original work. Her footnotes contained the first appearance of the general computing theory, a hundred years before an actual computer was built. Sadly, Lovelace died of cancer a decade after publishing the paper, and Babbage never built any of his machines.

But do not despair! The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage presents a rollicking alternate reality in which Lovelace and Babbage do build the Difference Engine and then use it to build runaway economic models, battle the scourge of spelling errors, explore the wilder realms of mathematics, and, of course, fight crime—for the sake of both London and science.

Sydney Padua is a graphic artist and animator. Sydney wrote this “Steampunk” graphic novel based on thorough research on the biographies and correspondence between Babbage and Lovelace, as well as other bits of early Victoriana, which is then twisted for humorous effect. Ryan Germick, our moderator, first graced the Museum’s stage in 2012 as a panel participant in The Art & Technology of Google Doodles Revolutionaries program. His pairing with Sydney will most definitely result in a thrilling and adventurous evening you won’t want to miss. Please join us.

There will be a book signing following tonight’s program. Kepler's Books will be onsite selling copies of the book before and after the program.

We are very pleased that KQED Radio will be recording this program for future broadcast.

This event is part of the Museum’s acclaimed Revolutionaries speaker series, featuring renowned innovators, business and technology leaders, and authors in enthralling conversations often with leading journalists. Our audiences learn about the process of innovation, its risks and rewards, and failure that led to ultimate success.

Members, please note that there is no member reception before the program. The Cloud Café will be open, come grab a quick bite, a glass of wine and connect with fellow CHM friends!
May 10, 2015 9:30 AM Speaker Series
Broadcom Presents:
Design_Code_Build Featuring Cisco’s Shraddha Chaplot
Join us on May 10th for a very special Mother’s Day edition of Design_Code_Build! We invite mothers and their children to participate in this day-long program together. Middle school students will enjoy a shared hands-on learning experience with their mothers as they work together to explore problem-solving and programming. Meet other families in the area and celebrate a geeky Mother’s Day with us!
Join us on May 10th for a very special Mother’s Day edition of Design_Code_Build! We invite mothers and their children to participate in this day-long program together. Middle school students will enjoy a shared hands-on learning experience with their mothers as they work together to explore problem-solving and programming. Meet other families in the area and celebrate a geeky Mother’s Day with us!

About Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build
Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a program of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events put on by the Computer History Museum. These one day long events are designed to introduce Bay Area middle school students, particularly those from populations that are typically underrepresented in high-tech professions, to the basic concepts behind coding and applied mathematics, in order to excite them about pursuing STEM in their education and future careers.

Through activities that emphasize problem solving, collaboration, creativity, and project-based learning, students gain hands-on experience building and programming a Raspberry Pi, designing instruction sets to navigate a life-sized maze, and working with Museum docents to investigate historic methods of computer programming. Each event is keynoted by a “rock star” – a tech industry luminary who shares his or her personal story to inspire students and pique their interest – and supported by other tech professionals who act as role models and mentors throughout the day.
Please note that this program is designed for grades 6 through 8.
May 13, 2015 10:30 AM Speaker Series
CHM Soundbytes:
Secrets of the Antikythera Mechanism
In 1900, sponge divers off the coast of the tiny Greek island of Antikythera made an astonishing discovery: the wreck of an ancient Roman ship lay 200 feet beneath the water, its dazzling cargo spread out over the ocean floor. Among the life-size statues and amphorae was an encrusted piece of metal, which after nearly a century of investigation, is finally revealing its secrets....
In 1900, sponge divers off the coast of the tiny Greek island of Antikythera made an astonishing discovery: the wreck of an ancient Roman ship lay 200 feet beneath the water, its dazzling cargo spread out over the ocean floor. Among the life-size statues and amphorae was an encrusted piece of metal, which after nearly a century of investigation, is finally revealing its secrets. Called the Antikythera Mechanism, study has shown that this improbably preserved object is actually an ancient Greek astronomical computer of a technical sophistication not seen until the clock making traditions of Medieval Europe -- 1,500 years after the Mechanism is believed to have been made (about 200 BC).

Recent advances in computer imaging as well as painstaking scholarship have finally elucidated nearly all details of the Mechanism and how it worked.

For this lecture and panel series, we have assembled several world experts on the Mechanism, each bringing a different perspective:

Marine archeologist Brendan Foley will describe his 2014 diving expedition to the original Antikythera wreck site and its findings, including using a special high-tech, million dollar diving Exosuit.

Michael Wright, former curator of mechanical engineering at The Science Museum in London will describe the structure and recreation of the Mechanism at University College London.

Professor Nicolaos Alexopoulos will discuss sociology, engineering and science in ancient Greece.