01
 
02
 
03
 
04
 
05
 
06
 
07
 
08
 
09
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13

The “Naked Mini” Company

PDC-808, serial #1

This 8-bit computer was sold as a Programmed Digital Controller, because the purchasing departments of some companies made it difficult to buy a “computer.” (The front panel is not original).

The “Naked Mini” Company

It was a familiar computer industry scenario: enthusiastic engineers leaving one minicomputer company to start their own.

Computer Automation, founded in 1967, created the “Naked Mini,” a cheap, easy-to-use, reliable computer “designed as a dependable component ready to bury into your system.” Engineers eager to “computerize” their products loved it.

Computer Automation founders at their previous company

Co-founder David Methvin, age 29, (kneeling far right) conceived and designed the CA 808 minicomputer. Also shown is Larry Goshorn (standing 2nd from right) co-founder of mini-maker General Automation.

View Artifact Detail
“Naked Mini” advertisement

The entry-level “Naked Mini,” designed to go inside other equipment, lacked a power supply, control panel and cabinet. Most customers ordered machines somewhat less naked.

View Artifact Detail
The Bank That Never Closes

A Chemical Bank ad in 1969 boasted, “On September 2nd our bank will open at 9:00 AM and never close again.” Their secret? The first Automatic Teller Machine, or ATM.

Docutel, a manufacturer of automated baggage handling equipment, developed it. Computer Automation provided the computer inside. Both cashed in on its success.

Don Wetzel at Chemical Bank

Don Wetzel invented the magnetic card stripe ATM. He thought of the idea while waiting in line to cash a check at a Texas bank.

View Artifact Detail
Docutel patent

Docutel’s first patent was for a “currency dispenser.” Later patents added “a full line of teller services.” The first installation was at Chemical Bank in 1969.

View Artifact Detail
Keywords
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19