Articles from 2019(15)

Silicon Chips Take Man to the Moon

Silicon Chips Take Man to the Moon

This is the story of these people, deeply involved in “work to put him there,” and how a decision to employ this unproven technology, criticized at the time as reckless, helped to launch the integrated circuit as an essential building block of today's digital world. Read More
Play Like A Girl: How Women Investors Succeed in Silicon Valley

Play Like A Girl: How Women Investors Succeed in Silicon Valley

Thirty years ago, no one thought we’d still be talking about discrimination, gender bias, and sexual harassment in 2019. Unfortunately, we are. Changing cultural norms takes time. What can women who thrive in the competitive, male-dominated world of Silicon Valley venture capital teach us in the meantime? Plenty. Read More
West Meets West: West Virginia Comes to Silicon Valley

West Meets West: West Virginia Comes to Silicon Valley

Over two days at the Computer History Museum, West Virginia student entrepreneurs and faculty were guided through activities that provided them with insights into what has made Silicon Valley a magnet for innovation for decades and how they could apply insights to their own future careers as entrepreneurs in West Virginia and beyond. Read More
Players Take the Field: Silicon Valley Leaders Share How Coach Bill Campbell Helped Them Succeed

Players Take the Field: Silicon Valley Leaders Share How Coach Bill Campbell Helped Them Succeed

On April 26, 2019, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki moderated a panel discussion with longtime Google leaders Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg, and Alan Eagle to reveal the leadership strategies of “Coach” Bill Campbell, as captured in their new book, Trillion Dollar Coach: The Leadership Playbook of Silicon Valley's Bill Campbell. Read More
“Woodstock of the Web” at 25

“Woodstock of the Web” at 25

2019 is a year of many web and networking anniversaries, or “netiversaries” to continue using an awful word. This year marks the 50th anniversary of general purpose computer networks. That first connection was over the ARPANET, between Douglas Engelbart’s laboratory at SRI and another node at UCLA. Such networks were built as transport for online systems like Engelbart’s oNLine System, famously demoed in late 1968, which is a key ancestor of the web. Read More
It's a Good Year for Asparagus: Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Celebrates 50 Years As an Independent Computer Chip Supplier

It's a Good Year for Asparagus: Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Celebrates 50 Years As an Independent Computer Chip Supplier

On May 1, 2019, Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) is set to celebrate its 50th anniversary as an important supplier of advanced semiconductor devices. AMD's survival as the only Silicon Valley computer chip manufacturer other than Intel to reach its golden anniversary as an independent company is an extraordinary achievement for an underdog considered least likely to succeed by industry pundits in the 1970s. Read More
Math Miracles for Missileers: The Aerospace Industry, Computer Programming, and the Rise of IBM

Math Miracles for Missileers: The Aerospace Industry, Computer Programming, and the Rise of IBM

Robert W. “Bob” Bemer - who worked at Lockheed's Missile Systems Division in Van Nuys and who would become its IBM 650's power user - carefully cut out the article and placed it into a scrapbook. In 2018, through its Access to Historical Records grant from the National Archives' National Publications and Records Commission, CHM digitized and made freely available online roughly 10 percent of Bemer's historical collection, over 3,000 pages. Read More
Blazing a Trail: Venture Capital Pioneers Reflect on the Industry

Blazing a Trail: Venture Capital Pioneers Reflect on the Industry

On March 28, 2019, in an event jointly sponsored by the National Venture Capital Association (NVCA) and the Computer History Museum (CHM), venture capital trailblazers William Draper III, C. Richard Kramlich, and Franklin “Pitch” Johnson discussed the highlights and challenges of their long careers and legendary firms. Read More
If Discrimination, Then Branch: Ann Hardy's Contributions to Computing

If Discrimination, Then Branch: Ann Hardy's Contributions to Computing

In the realm of software, a “branch” is a computer instruction that causes a shift from the default pattern of activity to a different sequence of actions, a different way of moving ahead if you will. For Ann Hardy, a pioneer in timesharing software and business, her contributions to computing were achieved through repeated, creative branching in the face of sexist discrimination. Read More
Happy 30th to the World Wide Web!

Happy 30th to the World Wide Web!

Thirty years ago this month, physicist turned programmer Tim Berners-Lee first proposed what became the World Wide Web. A few months later he resubmitted the proposal with his colleague Robert Cailliau. Today the web is living up to its ambitious name, serving over four billion people with more to come. Read More
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