About Marc Weber

Marc is Curatorial Director of CHM’s Internet History Program and developed the Web, Networking, and Mobile galleries of the Museum's permanent exhibit. He pioneered Web history as a topic starting in 1995, with crucial help from the Web's main inventor Sir Tim Berners Lee and other pioneers. He co-founded two of the first organizations in the field. He presents and consults to companies, journalists, filmmakers, patent firms, and museums on the history of the online world.

Articles by Marc Weber(22)

“Woodstock of the Web” at 25

“Woodstock of the Web” at 25

 May 24, 2019 Curatorial Insight
2019 is a year of many web and networking anniversaries, or “netiversaries” to continue using an awful word. This year marks the 50th anniversary of general purpose computer networks. That first connection was over the ARPANET, between Douglas Engelbart’s laboratory at SRI and another node at UCLA. Such networks were built as transport for online systems like Engelbart’s oNLine System, famously demoed in late 1968, which is a key ancestor of the web. Read More
Happy 30th to the World Wide Web!

Happy 30th to the World Wide Web!

 Mar 12, 2019 Curatorial Insight
Thirty years ago this month, physicist turned programmer Tim Berners-Lee first proposed what became the World Wide Web. A few months later he resubmitted the proposal with his colleague Robert Cailliau. Today the web is living up to its ambitious name, serving over four billion people with more to come. Read More
Net@50: Did Engelbart's “Mother of All Demos” Launch the Connected World?

Net@50: Did Engelbart's “Mother of All Demos” Launch the Connected World?

 Dec 09, 2018 Remarkable People
His goal was building systems to augment human intelligence. His group prototyped much of modern computing (and invented the mouse) along the way. Read More
Born in a Van: Happy 40th Birthday to the Internet!

Born in a Van: Happy 40th Birthday to the Internet!

 Nov 22, 2017 Curatorial Insight
Over the shortening fall days of 1977, an unmarked silver step van filled with futuristic equipment, shaggy-haired engineers, and sometimes fully uniformed generals quietly cruised the streets of the San Francisco Peninsula. Only an oddly shaped antenna gave a hint of its purpose. Read More
2017 CHM Fellow Lawrence G. Roberts

2017 CHM Fellow Lawrence G. Roberts

 Apr 27, 2017 Remarkable People
2017 CHM Fellow Larry Roberts (1937–2018) is honored for his seminal contributions to the evolution of our connected world. Following his early work in computer graphics and networking he was chief architect of the ARPANET, the US Department of Defense network that was a key building block of the later Internet. He was a champion of the x.25 networking standard, and a principal of the pioneering commercial networking corporation Telenet. Read More
A Tale of Deleted Cities

A Tale of Deleted Cities

 Sep 21, 2016 Curatorial Insight
In the very, very, beginning, the World Wide Web was meant to be a two-way medium. You could post and edit your own pages as easily as you could browse those created by others. But the browsers that made the web popular left out editing features. Read More
Happy 25th Birthday to the Public Web!

Happy 25th Birthday to the Public Web!

 Aug 05, 2016 Curatorial Insight
This month marks 25 years since the Web’s public announcement in several online forums and the release of the WWW code library, libWWW. The library was a kind of “roll your own” tool kit that gave volunteer programmers the pieces they needed to write their own Web browsers and servers. Their efforts—over half a dozen browsers within 18 months—saved the poorly-funded Web project and kicked off the Web development community. Read More
If the Computer Fits, Wear It

If the Computer Fits, Wear It

 Jun 30, 2015 Curatorial Insight
People wear the technology of their time. The stone-working techniques that made weapons also shaped beads for the body. When weaving was new, the intertwined warp and woof that made water-tight baskets also formed clothes. Smelting produced daggers and bracelets alike. Some technologies started off wearable – Galileo’s telescopes were a spinoff from spectacle makers. The toothed gears of mills and clocks made their way first to pockets, and then to our wrists. Electronics followed as the quartz wristwatch, then the digital version. Electronic headphones and earpieces eventually joined spectacles on our heads. Read More
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3