Articles in From the Collection(62)

The Boston Computer Society Presents: 1981 Forum on the Future of Personal Computers

The Boston Computer Society Presents: 1981 Forum on the Future of Personal Computers

Jonathan Rotenberg Sep 16, 2015
This is the first of five video releases of The Boston Computer Society (BCS) General Meetings, by the Computer History Museum. Read More
Electronic Arts DeluxePaint Early Source Code

Electronic Arts DeluxePaint Early Source Code

Len Shustek Jul 22, 2015
By the mid-1980s, mass-produced personal computers had finally become powerful enough to be used for graphics. Apple had released their drawing program MacPaint [5] with the first Macintosh in 1984. But at $2500 the Mac was expensive, and it only displayed black and white images. Read More
The World’s Smallest Computer

The World’s Smallest Computer

Dag Spicer Mar 26, 2015
Curatorial Insight, From the Collection Read More
Yesterday’s Tomorrows: The Origins of The Tablet

Yesterday’s Tomorrows: The Origins of The Tablet

Alex Lux Dec 17, 2014
By 1987, the PC revolution was well entrenched and underway. Desktop PCs were standard hardware for home enthusiasts, businesses, government agencies, and computer labs tucked away in college campuses. However, some prognosticators were also fast at work forecasting the future of a new generation of computing devices – and traditional PCs were not what they had in mind. Read More
Xerox Alto Source Code

Xerox Alto Source Code

Paul McJones Oct 21, 2014
Depending on your age, your first computer might have been an Apple II, a Radio Shack TRS-80, an IBM PC, an Apple Macintosh, or another of the early personal computers. If you missed these early machines the first time around, perhaps you have seen them in the Personal Computer section of the Revolution exhibit at the Computer History Museum. Read More
Early Digital Research CP/M Source Code

Early Digital Research CP/M Source Code

David Laws Oct 01, 2014
By the time personal computers based on microprocessors began to emerge in the mid-1970s, programmers had been writing operating systems for about twenty years. Big mainframe computers had operating systems that were huge and complicated, created from hundreds of thousands of lines of code. But other operating systems, designed to fit in the small memory of minicomputers, were tiny. That was the kind that the PCs could use. Read More
The Cryotron: Extremely Rare Superconducting Digital Circuits Come to CHM

The Cryotron: Extremely Rare Superconducting Digital Circuits Come to CHM

David Brock Jul 31, 2014
In the early 1950s, a young, enthusiastic and creative electrical engineer named Dudley Buck left the National Security Agency (NSA) for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Buck had worked on some of the first electronic digital computers at the NSA, and in Massachusetts joined the large program to develop Whirlwind, a powerful, real-time digital computer. In addition, Buck began work toward a PhD. In his research Buck explored a variety of possible switches for use in digital computers as rivals to vacuum tubes and the new transistors. He looked at various magnetic and ferroelectric possibilities before becoming seized with the idea of creating a superconducting switch. Such a switch had the potential to be both tremendously fast and wonderfully low power. Read More
The Juniper M40 Router

The Juniper M40 Router

Guy Fedorkow Jun 23, 2014
Early in 2014, the Computer History Museum added a Juniper M40 router to its collection. This router, initially released in 1998, was the first internet router to use custom-designed silicon to accelerate the movement of internet traffic in the largest nation-wide internet backbone networks. The M40 launched a race that continues to this day: keeping ahead of the growth of internet traffic with highly-specialized silicon technology. Read More
IBM and the 1964 World’s Fair
Microsoft Word for Windows Version 1.1a Source Code

Microsoft Word for Windows Version 1.1a Source Code

Len Shustek Mar 25, 2014
The dominant word processing program for personal computers in the 1980s was DOS-based WordPerfect. Microsoft Word for DOS, which had been released in 1983, was an also-ran. Read More
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