Articles in Remarkable People(45)

“Unprogramming” the ENIAC: Lehmer Child’s Play

“Unprogramming” the ENIAC: Lehmer Child’s Play

John Markoff May 09, 2017
At the dawn of the modern computing era teenager Laura Lehmer Gould and her brother Donald Lehmer were the youngest “un-programmers.” Read More
2017 CHM Fellow Lawrence G. Roberts

2017 CHM Fellow Lawrence G. Roberts

Marc Weber Apr 27, 2017
2017 CHM Fellow Larry Roberts (1937–2018) is honored for his seminal contributions to the evolution of our connected world. Following his early work in computer graphics and networking he was chief architect of the ARPANET, the US Department of Defense network that was a key building block of the later Internet. He was a champion of the x.25 networking standard, and a principal of the pioneering commercial networking corporation Telenet. Read More
2017 CHM Fellow Margaret Hamilton
Harry Sello: Silicon Pioneer and Industry Personality (1921–2017)

Harry Sello: Silicon Pioneer and Industry Personality (1921–2017)

David Laws Apr 14, 2017
June 1968, I checked in at the lobby of the Fairchild R&D facility on Miranda Drive in Palo Alto. A distinguished gentleman with a huge grin rushed towards me and, energetically pumping my hand, greeted me like long lost friend. Read More
2017 CHM Fellow Alan Cooper: Father of Visual Basic

2017 CHM Fellow Alan Cooper: Father of Visual Basic

Hansen Hsu Apr 11, 2017
2017 CHM Fellow Alan Cooper is best known as the “Father of Visual Basic,” possibly the most widely used visual programming environment in the software industry. Read More
2017 CHM Fellow Cleve Moler: Mozart of the Matrix
Hidden Figures No Longer

Hidden Figures No Longer

Caroline Evans Feb 14, 2017
Throughout computing history, there are many inspirational stories of how technology came about through hard work, determination, and overcoming odds. Unfortunately, many of these stories have not been told until recently. One of these untold stories concerns the inspiring women behind the early days of NASA who pitched in during World War II and helped the United States get to the moon. Read More
Remembering Erich Bloch (January 9, 1925–November 25, 2016)

Remembering Erich Bloch (January 9, 1925–November 25, 2016)

Gordon Bell Dec 13, 2016
Though Erich Bloch was less visible to most of the computing community, his contributions most likely impacted your life. As a pioneer who made his first contribution as the project engineer on the legendary IBM Stretch and who was responsible for manufacturing the IBM System/360, his work changed the fortunes of IBM to make it the world leader in computing. As a colleague, friend, and former boss, I saw his impact on computing, education, engineering, and scientific research and technology policies. He was also important to the Computer History Museum (CHM) as a Museum Fellow and as an early director of CHM’s predecessor institution, The Computer Museum (TCM). I’m happy to share this reminiscence of one of computing’s giants. Read More
Computing Luminaries Honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom

Computing Luminaries Honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom

Chris Garcia Nov 18, 2016
The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the highest honors that can be bestowed by the President of the United States. It recognizes “An especially meritorious contribution to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.” Read More
Silicon Valley: A Century of Entrepreneurial Innovation

Silicon Valley: A Century of Entrepreneurial Innovation

David Laws Sep 20, 2016
The entrepreneurial, technology-driven roots of today’s Silicon Valley sprouted long before Google’s algorithms, Apple’s two Steves, Fairchild’s chipmeisters, or the egalitarian management innovations of Hewlett and Packard. Eager emissaries from less prosperous regions of the nation and foreign governments striving to the replicate the tech economy back home are often surprised to learn that Silicon Valley did not happen overnight. Read More
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